HMHS History
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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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America's 'Megaregions' using Commuter Data

America's 'Megaregions' using Commuter Data | HMHS History | Scoop.it
New maps use math to define the amorphous term.

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Boris Limpopo's curator insight, December 11, 2016 1:43 AM
Le macroregioni americane con i dati del pendolarismo
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:53 AM
Plenty of space in the middle it seems
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 2016 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 2016 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 1, 2016 7:24 PM
A rainbow of shipping routes and info
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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | HMHS History | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2016 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 2016 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 3:05 PM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:19 PM

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:06 AM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportation, food distribution, technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


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Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 11:15 AM
unit 6
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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:57 AM

Another testament to why gentrification is effective yet harmful to the political status of a country or area, not producing accurate results to fit the people's needs.

Timothée Mariau's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:28 PM

Cet article parle de la gentrification dans le quartier d'Highland Park à Los Angeles. Ce quartier est un quartier avec une population majoritairement hispanique est constitué durant les dernières années une enclave résidentielle pour les habitants. Ce quartier était un symbole de la ségrégation raciale que connaissent une partie des villes américaines avec une concentration d'une seule population d'une seule origine ethnique dans le même quartier sans mixité sociale. Mais ces dernières années le quartier a été touché par un processus de gentrification qui a été plutôt bien accepté par les populations du quartier car cela a apporté de la mixité sociale dans le quartier avec l'arrivée de populations plus aisées provenant de différentes communautés et qui ont également créé des commerces dans le quartier. Cette gentrification qui est la plupart du temps vue d'un mauvais œil par les anciens résidents du quartier est ici acceptée car elle bénéficie en partie à la population du quartier, de plus la communauté hispanique est très importante culturellement et le fait savoir. Il y a donc une intégration des nouveaux arrivants mais en gardant tout de même l'identité originelle du quartier qui est très forte.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 23, 2016 12:24 PM

Andrea's Inshight: I feel like the author is trying to make himself sound a little bit above the "barrio" when he says "multiethnic mount Washington".  And then  continues by  sarcastically mentioning the charms and dysfunctions of the neighborhood. At first I was put off because I've never viewed HLP as a barrio. When I see that word I think of a ghetto slum. Which I don't think my nieghboorhood ever is. I've always viewed it as a working class neighborhood. I just dont like the barrio I think it puts a negative connotation towards the neighborhood.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:19 PM

Containers are part of globalization. It saves time and allows for extra space to store more products. Also, it is easier to handle using ships, railroad, and trucks while also facilitating more quality in terms of safety. However, on the other hand, with the creation of these containers employ mainly the use of technology which, unfortunately, downsizes the workforce. This, as a result, increases the unemployment rate for citizens. Although, when it comes to recycling, the idea of making houses with these containers helps families in diverse ways such as decreased costs, energy efficiency, and very short construction time. Containers have shaped the concept of shipping and living for many years, impacting regions with more business and expansion trades around the world.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article describes the basics of globalization and what technology really allowed globalization to spread, the shipping the container. It allowed thing to be shipped organized and more efficiently. These containers fit together perfectly. It helps ideas and products transport all over the world and spread pop culture. 

 

This relates to the idea in unit 3 of globalization. These shipping container allow ideas and products to be shipped all over the world. The shipping container was the key to better connecting the world. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


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Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tags: urban, planning, megacities, industry, economic, scale, TED, video.

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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Growth of underwater cables that power the web

Growth of underwater cables that power the web | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The map above, created with data from Telegeography, shows how those cables have developed since 1990. Most existing cables were constructed during a period of rapid growth in the mid-2000’s. This was followed by a gap of several years during which companies steadily exhausted the available capacity. Over the last few years, explosive new demand, driven by streaming video, has once again jumpstarted the the construction of new cables."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Interconnections
ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 28, 2016 2:48 AM
Growth of underwater cables that power the web
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 5:42 PM

Telecommunication linkages between continents, regions and cities. Note the strength of the trans-atlantic connections. These communication linkages enable communication between these areas.

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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2016 1:14 PM

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 26, 1:37 PM
unit 6
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 2016 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
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The Trans-Pacific Partnership Explained

"Stratfor Vice President of East Asia Analysis Rodger Baker talks about the economic and political aspects of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement." http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT ;


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Marc Meynardi's comment, November 3, 2015 12:37 PM
Thank you for your comments, which insist on the mean that the TPP is not just a way to free business. The treaty negotiated with EU, just arrive when EU politician are very critisized. Population is on a way back to conservatism and populism. Such treaty does'nt appear to be a good solution and for sure, does'nt come at the right time.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:35 AM

TPP

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:02 AM

This is a very politically contentious partnership and would reshape economic geographies and even regions of the world.  From the 1500's to the 1980's, the Atlantic trade had the greatest volume of world trade, but the Pacific has surged past, and is showing no signs of being supplanted any time soon.  This Stratfor video is a quick introduction to the economics and politics of the TPP. 


Tags: industry, development, economic.

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:06 AM

These charts are fantastic at explaining the impact that china is having on the world. their economy is massive, and they tend to use a massive amount of global resources. it also amazes me how big their population is.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:10 PM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


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majorlever's comment, May 1, 2015 11:29 PM
Good one
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 2, 2015 11:57 PM

global interconnections!!

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:04 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, National Geographic, video, visualization.

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Is it all over for Greece in the EU?

Robert Peston crunches the numbers as finance ministers meet for vital loan talks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 22, 2015 9:58 PM

This audio clip shows how the Greek economic crisis is an issue on the national, regional, and global scales.  This BBC video and article also provide some nice context, asking the question, what would happen in Greece quits the Euro? 


Tags: Greece, Europe, supranationalism, currency, economic, podcast

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 28, 2015 6:50 PM

If Greece decides to no longer be a part of the United Nations (UN), this will ultimately have a significant impact on Europe’s Union economy. The impact will affect not only Greece as country but also to all members of the UN. In addition to this enormous problem, it will be hard to keep together all countries if Greece goes because as we know certain countries as a Spain, Portugal, Italy and even France are also facing economic issues. Success depends largely on UN giving consent for the members of the organization. The downfall in this disagreement will weaken the economies of the European Union as a whole. On the other hand, cheap currency will create new opportunities and be beneficial for tourists.

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High Security Borders

High Security Borders | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Accelerated through the fear from the attacks of 9/11 and all what followed, the so called ‘Western Society’ is constructing the greatest wall ever build on this planet. On different building sites on all five inhabitable continents, walls, fences and high-tech border surveillance are under construction in order to secure the citizens and their high quality of life within this system. The fall of the Berlin Wall was described as the historical moment that marks the demolition of world’s last barrier between nation states. Yet it took the European Union only six years to create with the Schengen Agreement in 1995 a new division only 80km offset to the east of Berlin.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 11:04 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This article explains how the world is filled with division and segregation. Some of the most notable are the walls are the wall in berlin, the wall/border/river/fence between the u.s. and mexico and the border between north and south Korea is the most notable walls.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how people, through borders, have divided them through history creating new politics, culture and borders themselves. The political processes involved can change the policies and shapes of nations in the world.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:48 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows that hi-tech political surveillance of borders is highly correlated with the core areas of the global economy and some of the most attractive immigrant destinations.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What else do you see in this map?  What does this say about the world order?  Are there patterns that this map reveals/conceals?   


tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:19 AM

More than simple  'culture clash' or  'politics of fear' etc

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | HMHS History | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:24 AM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

 

This picture and article talks about the main use of the agricultural growth in the United States. It shows how most and almost all of the agribusiness is in the growth of feed and food for animals on the ranches rather than humans. The amount of money made is astounding with how far the table tilts toward animal feed.

 

This relates to Human Geography because agriculture is one of the main points. It shows how people use agribusiness and ow it leans more toward the consumption of animals rather than humans. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 2015 1:22 PM

This link consists of two maps that show agricultural land use in America. Nearly all of the "breadbasket region" is used not to feed people, but rather to create feed for cows and other animals. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
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Aboard a Cargo Colossus

Aboard a Cargo Colossus | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest container ships, longer than the Eiffel Tower is high, are a symbol of an increasingly global marketplace. But they also face strong economic headwinds.

Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:23 AM

This fascinating article also includes a nice trade route map and raises the quest for new trade routes. Great for year 9 Geography course in Australia - global interconnections

Brian Wilk's curator insight, April 30, 2015 8:54 AM

Now this is something positive for China to crow about, or is it? With large vessels like this to transport raw and finished goods, China becomes more and more of an economic powerhouse with their geographically centered location on the world map. They are the financial backers and engineering firm that is behind Nicaragua's decision to build a second canal through Central America. You would think through their expertise at building new cities with the construction and infrastructure build out required that they would be prime candidates for this immense project. The Three River Gorges Dam project was the world's largest construction project while it was being built. China's experience is overshadowed by its woeful environmental and humanitarian record in these past projects. It's time for them to show the world that they can do it expertly, with regard to human lives and the environment. This canal, if done properly, would go a long way on the world's stage to show that China has indeed emerged as a world power and not some Third World hack that they have been in the past.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

This article and video from the NY Times is a great way to show the magnitude of the largest vessels that drive the global economy. These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and today the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.