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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia'

Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia' | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The Czech Republic is expected to change its name to "Czechia" to make it easier for companies and sports teams to use it on products and clothing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 9:12 AM

That sound you hear is cartographers and database managers gasping at the joy and shock of need to updata all their data and maps.  Old maps still show Czechoslovakia, maybe on date in the future someone will be excited to find "The Czech Republic" on the map as much as I was fascinated to discover Hindustan on a 19th century globe. I also enjoyed this quote from the Czech foreign minister: “It is not good if a country does not have clearly defined symbols or if it even does not clearly say what its name is."  

 

Tag: Czechia, languagetoponyms, culture.

Laura Brown's curator insight, April 15, 11:22 AM

Marketing and media are the new gods. Can't imagine the power they have in order to cause a country to change it's name. Not so long ago battles and wars were fought over cultural identity, now it's for sale. 

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Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries

Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries | HMHS History | Scoop.it
They've been on the cutting edge of the English language since at least the 1500s

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Woodstock School's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:22 AM

Do we speak their language?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:03 PM

unit 3

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:37 PM

I find the social aspect of this absolutely fascinating; gender may be entirely a cultural construct, but we can see its influences in every aspect of human life. Women are responsible for 90 percent of linguistic changes that occur over the course of our lifetimes- because men resist such changes due to their (mostly) feminine origins. A good, witty read for those interested.

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Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive?

Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Sixty of Mexico's native languages are at risk of being silenced forever—but many people are working to keep them alive, experts say.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:28 PM

Monolingualism is great in the sense that it facilitates greater communication across a wider range of people, creating a sense of unity among those same people. However, lingual differences are one of the most beautiful aspects of human culture and civilization, with thousands of specific idioms and uses pertaining to each language shaping a millennium of various human experiences scattered across the globe. I often must explain to my friends that something that sounds good in one language I speak (I am moderately fluent in Portuguese) does not translate well in the other when each individual word is translated rather than the sentiment of the phrase as a whole. It is sad to think that this collection of specific nuances and experiences pertaining to a multitude of languages could be lost by the end of the century; in our desire to be closer to each other, we are losing the best of what we have to offer one another.  I hope that efforts to reverse this trend are successful. On a more light-hearted note, I did chuckle a little while reading that two of the last speakers of one of these indigenous languages in Mexico are two old men who refuse to speak to one another. They have the power to save something much larger than themselves, and yet are unable to do so because of petty, earthly rivalries. Humans are a complicated bunch.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:29 AM

The demise of a language is a truly tragic event. I am heartened to see that there are efforts being undertaken to preserve these historic languages. New technologies  will hopefully aid us in this effort. I imagine that the United States probably faces similar issues when it comes to language loss. We should coordinate some sort of national policy in how to deal with the issue. The current state of political affairs will probably hamper  the cause, but it is still worth a shot. I am in full support of all efforts that might preserve these classic languages.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:29 AM

This is one of the reasons that when immigrants come into this country its important they keep their native language going as well as learning to speak English. The sharing of culture, and language is indeed very important. Lots of people come to America and are told to speak English and eventually they lose their native language as well as culture. The English speaking only citizens of this country lose out on a good education about someone's native country. Its too bad. Just think music, language, food, values etc...there is a lot to learn.

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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:38 PM
Going by either the name Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan, Sometimes when people cannot agree on the name of a single place there is conflict, but apparently not here. it became an economic hub after they extracted natural gas, oil, and coal. Because of its location, a lot of the people in the area are Turkish and are Muslim. The Chinese government does not really like this and they are doing what they can to get rid of the Muslim ways, for example, one thing they have done is denounce the hijab, or ban any religious displays. .
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:11 AM

It is important to recognize that in a country so big, not everywhere is going to be the same. There is the city, the colder region, the dryer region, the warmer region, rural area etc. It is important to know that cultures are different as well. Some people refer to the red highlighted area s Xinjiang, but others call it Eastern Turkistan. Clearly, there are some cultural and political issues that reside in this area. The big concern is that the area is bordered to Central Asia and Eastern Asia as it has more Central and Eastern Asia characteristics as the people speak Turkic language and are predominantly Muslim. This goes to show that the Uygurs in this area are struggling to gain political power from China. Could there be a possible autonomy fight for this region? would it be politically and economically stable to stand on its own? 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

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Cultural Code-Switching

Cultural Code-Switching | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The way we mix languages and speech patterns is an apt metaphor for the way race, ethnicity and culture intersect in our lives."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 2015 3:57 PM

Who we are, and how we behave is often dependent on the the circumstances and the cultural norms that govern those situations, places and relationships.  All of us, including President Obama, fit into many distinct cultural environments and the picture above shows a quick moment, when he can slip in and out of cultural settings (this was spoofed by Key and Peele). 


Questions to Ponder: When do you 'code switch' and how come?  What does this mean for society at large and for the intersecting cultural groups with which we personally might identify?  When is this being fake or culturally inauthentic? 


Tags: culturelanguage, race, unit 3 culture.

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:15 PM

I found this video to be incredibly interesting. I am moderately fluent in Portuguese, and comparing the language with English has always left me with an incredible fascination with human languages in general. As uniquely complex as each language we speak today has become, it is always interesting to see similarities in pronunciation, grammar, and syntax between two languages we would never associate with each other; the other day, I was reading about the influences of French on the Anglo-saxon language structures we see today in modern English (it is believed that all native English speakers already know up to 15,000 words in French as well, all the result of French influences in the English royal court for hundreds of years). Seeing the word "sta" be manifested in so many different language groups- Germanic, Slavic, and Persian- is mind blowing when one considers how much time has passed since the word was first used. With many Americans today harboring numerous xenophobic and racist views concerning everything they perceive to be "other," it's nice to be reminded that, for all our differences, we are a lot more alike than many of us would like to admit. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:17 AM

it's interesting that a word that originated in one country half a world away influenced our entire nation, in the form of the name we took, and almost every nation on earth through the influence of language.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:27 PM

A very interesting little video. While I was already aware that the -stan at the end of the Central Asia state names meant country. What I found fascinating is how it derives from the term for field and standing thus being in or of a place. I also found it interesting how it brings up the other historical -stans but it failed to show Kurdistan for some reason because that is closer to becoming a reality than most of the others. The video unfortunately became difficult to follow for me at least after a while doing all the linguistic tracing to English and other indo-european languages to effectively say Canada and terms like homestead are similar if not the same type of thing as -stan. The Pakistan segments was interesting for simply learning what the first half of the nations name was. Lastly it should be observed that culturally and geographically the term 0stan seems to be in the Middle East/Central Asia and reference steppe decent cultures. Hopefully if a followup video is ever made it will clarify on these things a bit more and discuss Kurdistan which it left out.

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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:24 PM

I was happy to see an article like this. It's about time that these women are being given equal opportunities. Although they have a long way to go this is a step in the right direction. Saudi Arabian girls are being allowed to have sport related activities within their private schools. This did surprise me a little just because Saudi women's rights are very limited but this is a simple improvement just to the general health and well being of these girls. Two females competed in the last years summer Olympics representing Saudi Arabia and their efforts were not shown on Saudi TV. These women competing has opened a few doors to allowing more than just men to engage in these activities. Usually sports were only for the elite women who could afford gym memberships or attend well known colleges. Even though women cannot compete internationally or sign up for clubs or leagues this is a step in the right direction.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:47 PM

This is an interesting article about slowly allowing women in Saudi Arabia to participate in sports. While playing soccer or swimming or running may not seem so important to us in the West, it is a big deal for Saudi women. Saudi Arabia has some of the strictest laws in the Middle East regarding women's rights, and so even a very partial and gradual allowance for women to engage in sports is a big step. It shows perhaps a slight softening of adherence to Shariah law, which would hopefully eventually allow women more freedom in the realms of education and work, as well as in everyday life. 

 

Too often are people quick to judge and characterize other cultures or religions by the most extreme examples. While it is true that laws in Saudi Arabia are extremely restrictive to women, progress such as this, though small, may well act as a stepping stone for increased freedoms for women. People outside of Saudi Arabia and Islamic culture must realize that this kind of progress does happen and is, in fact, happening right now. To simply dismiss Saudi culture as misogynistic and oppressive is to write the whole culture off. While progress is slow and less than ideal, we should look to Saudi Arabia's Islamic neighbors and see that many of them are not so oppressive to women. Allowing Saudi women to participate in sports, therefore, may be setting up the country to increase women's rights and join its relatively more liberal neighbors. This is certainly a sign of positive change, and one that should not be ignored. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:28 AM

I was quite shocked to hear of this story. There is no denying, that this is a step forward for the women of Saudi Arabia. However, women are far from free in this country. The activates still have to be in accordance with Islamic Law. The strict dress code also remains in effect for the girls. The Sports themselves, must be overseen by women teachers. I would not call this initiative the Saudi equivalent of title nine, but it is a step forward. Every little inroad, is a step towards more equality. The government of Saudi Arabia appears to be at least slightly altering its view of women. Hopefully this will be the first step in movement to gain Saudi women more rights. In generations to come, hopefully Saudi women will look back on this development as the start of a cultural revolution in Saudi Arabia.     

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | HMHS History | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent

There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Speech with a drawl, twang, clipped consonants, broad vowels, slurred words or extra diphthongs might give away that the speaker is from the American South, Boston, the Midwest or elsewhere. The spice that a certain region may lend to spoken language can even be strong enough to flavor non-audible language as well. Indeed, American Sign Language (ASL) has its own accents. And like its audible counterpart, one of the strongest regional accents in ASL is that of Philadelphia residents, reports Nina Porzucki for PRI."

 

Tags: language, culture, regions.

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Abdulsalam Al-Mukradi's curator insight, February 14, 7:16 PM

Accents are varies but we really have to care about the language itself. Universities play a major role in avoiding accents in languages. They try to use one accent that follow the dictionary phonetics.

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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

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Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 2015 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:57 AM

Another testament to why gentrification is effective yet harmful to the political status of a country or area, not producing accurate results to fit the people's needs.

Timothée Mariau's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:28 PM

Cet article parle de la gentrification dans le quartier d'Highland Park à Los Angeles. Ce quartier est un quartier avec une population majoritairement hispanique est constitué durant les dernières années une enclave résidentielle pour les habitants. Ce quartier était un symbole de la ségrégation raciale que connaissent une partie des villes américaines avec une concentration d'une seule population d'une seule origine ethnique dans le même quartier sans mixité sociale. Mais ces dernières années le quartier a été touché par un processus de gentrification qui a été plutôt bien accepté par les populations du quartier car cela a apporté de la mixité sociale dans le quartier avec l'arrivée de populations plus aisées provenant de différentes communautés et qui ont également créé des commerces dans le quartier. Cette gentrification qui est la plupart du temps vue d'un mauvais œil par les anciens résidents du quartier est ici acceptée car elle bénéficie en partie à la population du quartier, de plus la communauté hispanique est très importante culturellement et le fait savoir. Il y a donc une intégration des nouveaux arrivants mais en gardant tout de même l'identité originelle du quartier qui est très forte.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 23, 12:24 PM

Andrea's Inshight: I feel like the author is trying to make himself sound a little bit above the "barrio" when he says "multiethnic mount Washington".  And then  continues by  sarcastically mentioning the charms and dysfunctions of the neighborhood. At first I was put off because I've never viewed HLP as a barrio. When I see that word I think of a ghetto slum. Which I don't think my nieghboorhood ever is. I've always viewed it as a working class neighborhood. I just dont like the barrio I think it puts a negative connotation towards the neighborhood.

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32 Mispronounced Places

32 Mispronounced Places | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"There’s nothing more irritating to a pedant’s ear and nothing more flabbergasting than realizing you’ve been pronouncing the name of so many places wrong, your entire life! Despite the judgment we exhibit toward people who err in enunciating, we all mispronounce a word from time to time, despite our best efforts. Well, now it’s time we can really stop mispronouncing the following places."


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 20, 2015 11:37 AM

So interesting!  I knew Louisville, only because my husband of almost 18 years is from there and taught me very early in our relationship that it was "Luh-vull".  ha!  

Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2015 3:14 AM

This fun article is telling people about common places that we butcher the names of. Some of the reasons that we say them wrong is because they are in different languages so we shouldn't be pronouncing everything perfectly. But the ones that we say everyday like Colorado, is because we ALL mispronounce it so it becomes the norm. This article really sheds some light on the way that languages can be misinterpreted or changed because of people.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:16 AM

I love discovering I've mispronounced a word, particularly place names. Most of these are in the US but the few international examples are interesting (and the mispronounced variations are perplexing, perhaps we're blessed in Australia with journalists who can pronounce tricky foreign toponyms). I'm surprised Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) and Uluru (NT, Australia) don't make the list.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:10 AM

unit 3

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A tour of the British Isles in accents

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.

 

Tags: language, culture, English, UK.


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Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, April 6, 2014 4:33 AM

He's really quite good, and the seamless change of dialect is quite impressive!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:32 AM

The diversity of the English language is amazing.  Even in the "motherland" it changes from location to location...aye bay goom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:19 PM

This is a really interesting video for understanding regional dialect differences!

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:06 PM

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:06 AM

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.

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Breakfasts Around the World


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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A 'Ziggy' Path to the NFL

Ezekiel "Ziggy" Ansah's journey to the NFL, beginning as a walk-on to the Brigham Young University football team from Accra, Ghana, who had never played foot...

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Seth Dixon's comment, April 26, 2013 7:36 PM
I have (and forgot that's where the nugget of the 'hockey' idea came from). I just wish I had those cool glasses! Poor Eagles, Ziggy is ultimate high risk/high reward pick.
megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:30 AM

"The article discusses Ziggy who is orginally from Ghana who came to America and usually played soccer. As a result of coming to America and his profound athletic ability adjusted to the American tradition of playing football one of America's number one past times. He came into a foreign country and not only made it his home but made football a challlenge he was going to conquere. It was not always easy but with the talent, right tools, and the right people to inspire and push him he is one of the best players in 2013."

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:53 PM

The story of Ziggy is a great one; it not only shows how hard work and perseverance pay off, but also the importance of cultural diffusion. After hearing how ziggy grew up it was clear that he had some natural athletic talent, but with out the ability to come to school in America he would have never had a chance to explore his football abilities. I liked how in the video they showed a clip of him talking to the head coach when he first asked to play and he said, “ You know this isn’t soccer.” And Ziggy responded by saying, “Yes I understand but if you give me a chance I believe I can do well.”

This just shows how much geography can limit possibilities, Ziggy had never even had the opportunity to try out, train or play football from a young age. I guess it all kind of reminds me of how America is really a land of opportunities, and how a sophomore at BYU with no prior football experience can go to being the 2013 number five overall draft pick in the NHL.