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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 2014 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:51 PM

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years. helps show the nature of change around the United States and its impact in the enviorment.

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.


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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

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Miguel Alfaro's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:51 PM

Informacion de Latinos en los Estados Unidos.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities.