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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis | HMHS History |
Thousands of refugees, many of them fleeing the brutal conflict in Syria, are streaming across Europe in search of safety and security.

Via Seth Dixon
Beth Marinucci's curator insight, September 29, 2:09 AM

Great tool to help explain the ongoing crisis to students.  

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 7:29 AM

Syrian refugees

Emma Boyle's curator insight, October 2, 1:58 PM

For your debate research.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | HMHS History |

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."

Via Seth Dixon
Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | HMHS History |
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.


Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 9:08 AM

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 18, 8:08 PM

This text tells about a geographer who exaggerates today's modern dependency of Global Positioning Systems and Mapping, and the importance of still developing a mental map. It is important because lack of reliance of our mental maps leads to a primal fear and increasing instances of the feeling of being lost. The challenge is presented of how we stimulate technology in our mental maps. 


This article describes technological and mental process of mapping and how we should use it in our everyday lives. This is important because it gives humans a sense of direction and tells us how to keep it.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 6:20 PM

This is an article that explains and adds on to the fact that we Americans have begun too reliant on technology. Keith explains how kids now a days don't have a geographical sense and how it is really going to hurt them in the future.


I thought that this article was interesting, because it is a pretty controversial topic and very relatable.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Mapping Rocky's Run

Mapping Rocky's Run | HMHS History |

"As a kid, I grew up watching the Rocky movies, shadow boxing with my brothers and doing push-ups during the workout montages.  One on my favorite scenes was in Rocky II when Rocky runs through the whole city of Philadelphia, thronged by adoring fans as he runs to the top of the stairs to the Philadelphia Museum of Art (and yes, of course I re-enacted that scene when I was there)."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:45 AM

My family and I have watched the Rocky series a handful of times, and a month or two ago, my grandmother called our house all frantically to let us know that "Rocky" was on TV, in case we wanted to watch it.  I used to be big into going for long walks across a few towns every night, and this article reminded me of some of the walks that I had been on, and have actually mapped out.  The expression "walking around in circles" does not fully apply to many places, because they have semi-straight roads and often have 90 degree intersections with other roads, which would make it walking in rectangular patterns.  I have walked well over 20 miles in a single night, and found myself exploring side roads and looking them up later on an online map of the area.  In this article, Rocky runs in a "circular" pattern, but from his house to the final steps that he runs up at a museum, rather than returning to his house.  In this map with the article, Rocky is shown as covering a large area on his run, without overlapping the same areas all that often.  "Rocky" is a series about achieving dreams and defying odds- actions that are different with different characters and different outcomes in every movie.  It makes sense that Rocky covers a little bit of the same ground twice, metaphorically in the movies, and literally on the map, but also that he achieves his destination after going the long and difficult distance rather than a bee-line to the destination, that would defeat the depth of the story.  Rocky's run is symbolic as a journey mentally, physically, and spiritually, and is enforced by the route that he was found to have run, as analyzed by this article and its links.  While I found myself walking 15 miles to a place, and back in the same night, I was merely part of a cycle.  Rocky is a hero because he went the distance.

Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:08 PM
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:14 PM

I too loved this movie growing up. Everytime Rocky was brought up you always remebered the part when Rocky ran up the stairs to the statue after his long training run. Just from his run you see the type of community they lived in. His town was very rundown, but you still got a sense of community by the way people yelled and cheered for Rocky as he ran by. They may not have had much as a community, but they supported each other and took pride in their city. You were able to get all of this just from the different landmarks you saw Rocky pass by on his run. You may not think about it at the time, but the location and scenary really paints a picture of the type of lifestlye and culture Rocky grew up in, and what makes him the man that he is. That is all just from simply paying attention to the landmarks that he runs by. Location really effects a person and you can see that in this movie. Rocky was a fighter who never gave up. His community was the same way. And looking at the map I don't think I was would ever want to run that far. It appeared a lot shorter in the movie than it actually is!

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | HMHS History |

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.

Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | HMHS History |

Via Seth Dixon
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:06 PM

Maps come in all shapes and sizes. This one shows the divisions in Africa and how its been shaped and defined since colonization.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:19 AM

While most people perceive Africa as a country rather than a continent, European cartographers were even more oblivious to the make up of the continent. How is it possible that a mountain can directly across the continent. This also raises the question, how was conquering the continent possible if this mountain sat at the frontier of the continent? Wouldn't the natives know where to escape when European settlers came to conquer their land?

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

The true size of ...

The true size of ... | HMHS History |
This site is used to highlight the distortion issues caused by the Mercator map projection. It can be used to show the true size of countries

How it Works

1. Enter a country or state name

2. Hover over selection for size information

3. Click on selection to drag

4. Right-click on selection to delete


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 24, 2:11 PM

unit 1

Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 6:00 AM

Not all is as it appears.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 10:32 AM


Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | HMHS History |
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.

Via Seth Dixon
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 7:14 AM

History of maps

tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 5:11 AM

Can generate some useful observations,discussions and debates in class

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 12:00 PM

It is notable that the world's map has changed much since the advent of cartography, and many believed that the Americas were part of Asia. This is represented in the map.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO!

Visited States Map

Visited States Map | HMHS History |

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 19, 2014 9:45 PM

really cool site!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 12:28 AM

I haven't been to a lot of United States. I have been to Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina. As we can see, I pretty much know New England pretty well. I would however, like to travel throughout the west side of the United States.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | HMHS History |

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."

Via Seth Dixon
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Global flight paths

Global flight paths | HMHS History |
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.

Via Seth Dixon
jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 7:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class.
L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:25 AM

Global networks

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | HMHS History |

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  


Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  


Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.

Via Seth Dixon
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 11:16 PM

I'm really glad at how the cartographer of this map was able to properly demonstrate the way the American population voted during the 2012 presidential  election. Unlike the map that we are accustomed to seeing on television during political elections. What I appreciate about this map is how it tries to represent the way in which Americans caste their votes. While you'd be led to believe that certain states voted a particular way, this map proves otherwise. Another thing that this map does is represent the states that are widely considered to be Republican, and Democratic. States that tend to be in favor of GDP are conservative states, such as that of the south with the exception of FL, and the rest of the country being fairly liberal. Nonetheless, this is definitely and interesting and telling map of our patterns as voters.