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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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In an Ideal World...

In an Ideal World... | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Tags: art, fun.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:09 PM

unit 1ish  :)

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 8:45 PM

I am absolutely fascinated by Earth's Physical Environments. What I like specifically about this map and most maps for that matter is that you won't find a lot of comfortable environments that introduce you to many environmental areas in real life. As long as I have the survival skills, I would love to live in a place where I can know what are Earth's Physical Environments.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | HMHS History | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:09 PM

This falls under the category of language because it shows the origin, relationship, diffusion, and geography of different religions. It can also be used to tell how specific words originated by knowing the language it branched from.

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If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | HMHS History | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


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Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!