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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 2014 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:17 PM

Unit 2

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:05 AM

The extremely young median age seen across Africa hints at the problems found throughout the continent. This demographic factor suggests that there are other political, economic, and cultural problems that are influencing these young ages. It shows that most people do not live long lives, and even the older countries on the continent are younger than most other places. The only other place with low ages are the Middle East and Central Asia, and even their populations are several years older than the African continent.

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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:42 PM

The optimistic tone set in this peace was very moving; using the idea that 7 billon people could fit in LA really drove home how massive earth is. When they were showing our population growth it seemed like the graph started to level off. Clearly technology was the reason for the expediential spike and as long as technology can keep up we will create sustainable solutions for everyone in the world.  The ideas are out there they just need to be put into the right hands, 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:01 PM


At the rate we are going we will hit 10 billion in no time because there are people in this world that have more than two kids. The ideal numbers of kid’s people have. There is one show that comes to mind is 19 kids and counting on TLC. They are a family of almost thirty living in one big house. The mother of the bunch is probably in her late 40's and is still having more kids as we speak she is probably pregnant with number 20. They should not have more kids because in no time they will run out of space and have to build a new house that could hold so much people. At the rate they are having kids the world is growing and growing population wise. The world can only hold so much people at a time. One good example is china and being a 3 billion people country and still growing day by day. 10 billion is a lot of people to take care of it will be twice as hard to maintain. There are more children being born than people dyeing. Population growth will affect everyone in regards to food supply and medicine wise.

 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

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The Next America

The Next America | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
more...
Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population