Mathematics
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Has the age of quantum computing arrived?

Has the age of quantum computing arrived? | Mathematics | Scoop.it
It’s a mind-bending concept with the potential to change the world, and Canadian tech company D-Wave claims to have cracked the code
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Improving electric motor efficiency via shape optimization

Improving electric motor efficiency via shape optimization | Mathematics | Scoop.it
In our competitive global society, successful and economical design of automotive and industrial structures is crucial.
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3 Revolutionary Women of Mathematics

3 Revolutionary Women of Mathematics | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Everyone knows that history's great mathematicians were all men—but everybody is wrong

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Mujeres en matemáticas. 
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, March 25, 8:27 PM
Mujeres en matemáticas. 
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The mathematics of love

The mathematics of love | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Finding the right mate is no cakewalk -- but is it even mathematically likely? In a charming talk, mathematician Hannah Fry shows patterns in how we look for love, and gives her top three tips (verified by math!
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What Mathematics Reveals About the Secret of Lasting Relationships and the Myth of Compromise

What Mathematics Reveals About the Secret of Lasting Relationships and the Myth of Compromise | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Why 37% is the magic number, what alien civilizations have to do with your soul mate, and how to master the ideal "negativity threshold" that ensures Happily
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The biggest mystery in mathematics: Shinichi Mochizuki and the impenetrable proof

The biggest mystery in mathematics: Shinichi Mochizuki and the impenetrable proof | Mathematics | Scoop.it
A Japanese mathematician claims to have solved one of the most important problems in his field.
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Explosive Contagion: Mathematical Model Explains How Things Go Viral

Explosive Contagion: Mathematical Model Explains How Things Go Viral | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Using epidemic models that draw comparisons between transmission of complex social phenomena and infectious diseases, scientists developed a model that includes impact of friends and acquaintances in the sudden spread of new ideas.
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Paradox at the heart of mathematics makes physics problem unanswerable

Paradox at the heart of mathematics makes physics problem unanswerable | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Gödel’s incompleteness theorems are connected to unsolvable calculations in quantum physics.
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Ancient Babylonians 'first to use geometry' - BBC News

Ancient Babylonians 'first to use geometry' - BBC News | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Sophisticated geometry - the branch of mathematics that deals with shapes - was being used at least 1,400 years earlier than previously thought, a study suggests.
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Inside Google's Quantum Computing Lab, Questing for the Perfect Computer | MIT Technology Review

Inside Google's Quantum Computing Lab, Questing for the Perfect Computer | MIT Technology Review | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Physicist John Martinis could deliver one of the holy grails of computing to Google—a machine that dramatically speeds up today’s applications and makes new ones possible.
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10 New & Useful Social Media Stats and Research Studies

10 New & Useful Social Media Stats and Research Studies | Mathematics | Scoop.it
The latest social media research studies and statistics to help inform your marketing efforts.
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Solution: “Creating Art With Mathematics” | Quanta Magazine

Solution: “Creating Art With Mathematics” |  Quanta Magazine | Mathematics | Scoop.it
The solution to this month’s puzzle explains the artful mathematics behind symmetrical patterns.
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Flight delayed after passenger becomes suspicious of equation - BBC News

Flight delayed after passenger becomes suspicious of equation - BBC News | Mathematics | Scoop.it
An American regional flight is delayed after a woman called security because the passenger next to her was working on a maths equation.
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15 Uncanny Examples of the Golden Ratio in Nature

15 Uncanny Examples of the Golden Ratio in Nature | Mathematics | Scoop.it
The famous Fibonacci sequence has captivated mathematicians, artists, designers, and scientists for centuries. Also known as the Golden Ratio, its ubiquity and astounding functionality in nature suggests its importance as a fundamental characteristic of the Universe.

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"The Fibonacci sequence starts like this: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 and so on forever. Each number is the sum of the two numbers that precede it. It's a simple pattern, but it appears to be a kind of built-in numbering system to the cosmos. Here are 15 astounding examples of phi in nature."
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, March 20, 11:14 AM
"The Fibonacci sequence starts like this: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 and so on forever. Each number is the sum of the two numbers that precede it. It's a simple pattern, but it appears to be a kind of built-in numbering system to the cosmos. Here are 15 astounding examples of phi in nature."
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Best and worst graduate degrees for jobs in 2015

Best and worst graduate degrees for jobs in 2015 | Mathematics | Scoop.it
PayScale crunched the numbers for Fortune and identified the grad degrees that lead to lucrative careers -- and those that lead to high stress and low pay.
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The 50 Best Mathematics Programs in the World Today | The Best Schools

The 50 Best Mathematics Programs in the World Today | The Best Schools | Mathematics | Scoop.it
We've identified the 50 best math programs and reveal the most important characteristics of each to help you find the best mathematics program for you!
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The subtle mathematics of voting

The subtle mathematics of voting | Mathematics | Scoop.it
That’s Maths: Although well-defined, the process of Irish-style PR is complicated and gives rise to debate and disputes
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A New Hope for a Perplexing Mathematical Proof

A New Hope for a Perplexing Mathematical Proof | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Three years ago, a solitary mathematician released an impenetrable proof of the famous abc conjecture. At a recent conference dedicated to the work, optimism mixed with bafflement.
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Mathematicians Predict the Future With Data From the Past

Mathematicians Predict the Future With Data From the Past | Mathematics | Scoop.it
In Issac Asimov's classic science fiction saga Foundation, mathematics professor Hari Seldon predicts the future using what he calls psychohistory. Drawing on mathematical models that describe what happened in the past, he anticipates what will happen next, including the fall of the Galactic Empire. That may seem like fanciful stuff. But Peter Turchin is a kind of real-life Hari Seldon -- and he's not alone.
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Mathematicians left baffled after three-year struggle over proof

Mathematicians left baffled after three-year struggle over proof | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Shinichi Mochizuki may have come up with a vital mathematical result – but despite a workshop dedicated to it last week, hardly anyone can grasp it
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