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Supreme Court won't televise health arguments

Supreme Court won't televise health arguments | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Politico: The Supreme Court on Friday confirmed it will not televise coverage of the health care reform case oral arguments, but it will provide same-day audio of the proceedings.

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Getting Doctors to Think About Costs

Getting Doctors to Think About Costs | #HITsm | Scoop.it

New York Times: The nonprofit organization, Costs of Care, and the young doctor who created it are determined to help doctors in training reconcile cost consciousness with quality care.


Over the last two years, Dr. Neel Shah, a senior resident in obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, has been collaborating with medical educators and health care economists at Harvard Medical School and at the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago to create a series of videos and educational materials designed to help medical students and doctors-in-training learn to make clinical decisions that optimize both quality of care and cost. With support from the American Board of Internal Medicine, these educational modules, called the Teach Value Project, could represent a significant breakthrough in how medical students learn to be conscious of costs.

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From The Blog: The Future is Quantified, a Convergence of Trends

From The Blog: The Future is Quantified, a Convergence of Trends | #HITsm | Scoop.it

This new post by Angela Dunn (@blogbrevity) explores how the popular technologies we use -- social media, mobile, big data, the Internet -- will shape the future when these trends converge. She writes:


"I think the Quantified Self movement is where all these trends converge, and I believe the future will be quantified."

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From The Blog: A Med Student's first experience with a lumbar puncture

From The Blog: A Med Student's first experience with a lumbar puncture | #HITsm | Scoop.it

As a class, we were able to practice this technique on simulators. The simulators were basically a lower torso similar to human skin. When it was my turn to do the procedure, I was a little nervous since we were in a group of 5 to 6 students and didn’t want to mess up too bad in front of my classmates.


I got up to the simulator and palpated, or felt the space where I was supposed to place the needle. As a D.O., palpitation skills are very important to the profession, because this is something that separates us from our M.D. counterparts, which gives the D.O.s an advantage in this type of procedure.

I placed the needle in the proper area but, on first try, I just missed, , as the doctor showed me on the simulator. The second time around was much better. It was great because the doctor told us that we should feel a pop right before we get into the space.


On my second try, I went into the area fairly deep, where I seemed to reach a barrier. I pushed the needle a little farther in and felt the pop. The liquid that they place in the simulator started flowing, and it was pretty cool that I just performed my first spinal tap, or lumbar puncture.


This was the first actual “clinical” skill I have learned, and there are many more to come, which is very exciting.

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From The Blog: The Unequal and Unfair Healthcare Business ‘Model’

From The Blog: The Unequal and Unfair Healthcare Business ‘Model’ | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Med student Mark Munns posted a prevocative post today (don't let the Trump photo prevent you from reading):


"How is it that two hospitals in the same city receive different payments for the same procedure? The difference in cost is in no way tied to quality or convenience like one would expect outside of the healthcare bubble. If one digs long enough, at best you find a jumbled, nonsensical list of criteria that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) “take into account” when deciding reimbursement rates.


"Private insurance companies develop individual contracts with hospitals. Call me crazy, but I doubt that there is any reason an arthroscopy costs $400 more if the patient is insured by United Healthcare instead of Aetna. Costs for some procedures can vary 10 times or more from hospital to hospital. From a billing and reimbursement standpoint, this sounds like nothing short of a nightmare."

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Patient Participation at Medical Meetings: No Longer Optional

Patient Participation at Medical Meetings: No Longer Optional | #HITsm | Scoop.it

From Common Sense: Medical conferences in have long been tilted toward experts — those with data or experience. And attendees have long been rank-and-file health care providers who want to stay on the cutting edge of their field. In the old, top-down system, having patients at these confabs was superfluous. But those days are over, driven by three trends that are likely to reshape the health care system:

  1. The empowered e-patient is demanding the same information available to professionals. And if that information is available at medical meetings, that’s where the patients should be.
  2. Increasingly, information is transmitted not only from provider to patient, but patient-to-patient. It’s no longer a safe assumption to believe that information only travels in one direction.
  3. The patient experience is increasingly important in the treatment process. The way quality of life impacts benefit-risk calculations is highly personal, making an open discussion with patients crucial to understanding diagnosis and treatment.
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A Dr. Mostashari Smackdown of recent reports that EHRs don't reduce costs

A Dr. Mostashari Smackdown of recent reports that EHRs don't reduce costs | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Health IT Buzz: There are several reasons why McCormick’s study ultimately tells us little about the ability of electronic health records (EHRs) to reduce costs, and why it tells us nothing about the impact of EHRs on improving care.


The Study Was Not About EHRs At All, Much Less Their “Meaningful Use”


The Study Falls Prey to the Classic Fallacy of Using Association to Suggest Causality


The Study Did Not Consider the Appropriateness of Imaging Tests


Reducing Test Orders Is Not the Way that Health IT Is Meant to Reduce Costs


What study/report is Mostashari refutting?

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Gene-Z Point of Care Genetic Testing System Update

Gene-Z Point of Care Genetic Testing System Update | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Last summer scientists at Michigan State University reported about a new device they developed, called Gene-Z, that performs genetic analysis on microRNAs. The device is low cost, uses an Apple iPod Touch as an interface, and doesn’t require much energy, so can be charged using solar panels (you’ll need bigger ones for the iPod).


Via Substance Active
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Former VA leader to chair EHR board

Former VA leader to chair EHR board | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Modern Physician: Dr. James Peake, former U.S. Veterans Affairs secretary, has been named chairman of the board of the Open Source Electronic Health Record Agent, the not-for-profit organization created last year at the behest of the Veterans Affairs Department to serve as the custodial agent of an open-source development project to upgrade the VA's public-domain VistA electronic health-record system.


In addition to Peake, Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston; and Michael O'Neill, senior adviser to the director of the VA's Innovation Initiative, also were named board directors, while Lt. Gen. Dr. Charles Green, surgeon general of the U.S. Air Force, was named as the Defense Department's liaison to the project, OSEHRA announced.

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Weird! Scan Your Food For Bacteria With Your Cell Phone

Weird! Scan Your Food For Bacteria With Your Cell Phone | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Popular Science: Have you ever been tempted to order steak tartare but decided against it for fear of getting sick? This little cell phone scanner can take a look at it for you and let you know if it does in fact harbor any E. coli bacteria.


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From The Blog: 'The Creative Destruction of Medicine'

From The Blog: 'The Creative Destruction of Medicine' | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Jon Mertz says that the book "The Creative Destruction of Medicine" by Dr. Eric Topol is a must read. It logically and passionately lays out how real change is going to come to the American healthcare system.


From the book:


“Eventually there will be enough digital native physicians to take charge, but that will take decades to be accomplished. In the meantime, consumers are fully capable of leading the movement and contributing to medicine’s creative destruction. And so they must.”

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Stranger from Facebook gives a kidney to save another's life

Stranger from Facebook gives a kidney to save another's life | #HITsm | Scoop.it

From Q13 Fox News (Seattle): Facebook connects millions of people every day. But for one local man, the social website saved his life.


And he has a total stranger to thank.

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What if Your Hotel Bill Was Like a Hospital Bill?

Counterpoint from the NY Times: Hospitals Aren't Hotels, they Often Must Hurt to Heal

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McAllen, Texas and the high cost of health care

McAllen, Texas and the high cost of health care | #HITsm | Scoop.it

From The New Yorker:
The Cost Conundrunm. What a Texas town can teach us about healthcare.


The question we’re now frantically grappling with in regards to out of control healthcare costs is how this came to be, and what can be done about it. McAllen, Texas, the most expensive town in the most expensive country for health care in the world, seemed a good place to look for some answers.

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Hacker Shows Off Lethal Attack By Controlling Wireless Medical Device

Hacker Shows Off Lethal Attack By Controlling Wireless Medical Device | #HITsm | Scoop.it

From Bloomberg.


In his San Francisco apartment, Barnaby Jack waves a small antenna to demonstrate how a deadly hacker attack against a diabetic would begin.

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White House Works to Shape Debate Over Health Law

White House Works to Shape Debate Over Health Law | #HITsm | Scoop.it

New York Times: The Obama administration has begun an aggressive campaign to use approaching Supreme Court arguments on the new health care law as a moment to build support for the measure.

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From The Blog: Cybrarians contribute to RN use of evidence-based practice

From The Blog: Cybrarians contribute to RN use of evidence-based practice | #HITsm | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Thew, RN: EBP has really taken off in the nursing profession over the past five years as hospitals strive to improve patient outcomes and patient safety, save money, and push for for Magnet designation. It involves applying research and data to direct patient care in the hopes of improving outcomes. EBP is not theoretical, it is practical. It allows nurses to take research and use it at the bedside.


Melissa Cole, RN, Senior Consultant at Healthcare Transformation Resources, said medical librarians can be even more valuable when they leave the stacks and join the healthcare team at the bedside. Cole said Lorri Zipperer , of Zipperer Project Management, coined the word ”cybrarians,” to describe medical librarians who use technology to find, evaluate and share information with the clinical team.


“There’s so much information out there,” said Cole. “Clinicans can’t be expected to hold it all in their brains.”


Cole and LSU Clinical Medical Librarian Julie Esparza, are co-writing a book chapter on using cybrarians at the bedside.


“The cybrarian rounds with a laptop and has access to something other than WebMd,” explained Cole.

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Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 6, 2012 9:47 PM
Chad, love this formatting and great scoops! Thanks, Marty
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Meaningful Use Stage 2: How the Changes Impact Integration

Meaningful Use Stage 2: How the Changes Impact Integration | #HITsm | Scoop.it

GENi Blog, by Rob Brull: The proposed rules for Meaningful Use Stage 2 impact the standards that are used for data exchange and the required utilization of interoperability by providers. Some of the areas that are most impacted by the proposed rules include:

  • Patient Summary
  • Clinical Messages
  • Electronic Prescribing
  • Transport Specifications

Click the link to read more about how interoperability standards have changed in the new proposed rules.

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Hospital Groups Will Get Bigger, Moody’s Report Says

Hospital Groups Will Get Bigger, Moody’s Report Says | #HITsm | Scoop.it

New York Times: Responding to changes in health care, big hospital groups are expected to get even bigger. And some hospitals will join forces with once-unlikely partners, health insurers and for-profit companies, a new report says.


ACO Portion alert: Insurers may be looking to join with hospitals as a way of improving their competitiveness, especially if they are expected to create networks of hospitals and doctors that are responsible for delivering and coordinating care for large communities.

Insurers need to think about combining with hospitals and doctors so they can be more of a one-stop shop, said John Nelson, a Moody’s executive who also worked on the report.


In the end, patients are likely to have fewer hospitals from which to choose in any given market, but these combinations could result in a financially stronger system that is better able to deliver higher-quality care at lower costs, Ms. Goldstein said.

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Electronic Access For Physicians To Prior Tests Did Not Reduce Costs

Electronic Access For Physicians To Prior Tests Did Not Reduce Costs | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Health Affairs Blog: Despite the widely held assumption that physicians having computer access to patients’ test results will reduce testing, doctors who have such access to tests in the ambulatory care setting are more likely to order imaging and lab tests. That’s the finding of a study in the March issue of Health Affairs, released March 5th.


The authors say their findings challenge one premise of the nation’s multibillion-dollar effort to promote widespread adoption of health information technology (HIT). They warn that the effort “may not yield anticipated cost savings from reductions in duplicative or inappropriate diagnostic testing” and, in fact, could drive costs up.

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Opinion: Do Electronic Medical Records Save Money?

Opinion: Do Electronic Medical Records Save Money? | #HITsm | Scoop.it

Editorial in The New York Times: Experts have long argued that computerized patient records will save the health system money by helping doctors reduce the number of redundant or inappropriate tests they order. A new study published in Health Affairs, disputes that, suggesting that office-based physicians who have access to electronic records of patient care are actually more likely to order additional imaging tests and laboratory tests than doctors who rely on paper record.


The study did not explore why. But its leader, Dr. Danny McCormick, an assistant professor at the Harvard Medical School, suggested that the ease of ordering tests and receiving results by computer may encourage doctors to order more tests than they would if they had to get results by phone and interpret blurry fax images.


The study’s authors argue that previous research that showed savings were done at leading medical centers with sophisticated technology. Many doctors’ offices buy off-the-shelf systems, primarily for billing purposes, that may not be able to track down redundancies or lack software to help doctors decide if a test is appropriate.


We still believe that widespread adoption of electronic medical records will improve care and reduce costs. It is also clear that many office-based physicians will need help in making the transition. No matter how adept doctors become with computerized records, they will need to be pushed to rein in excessive use of tests.

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Monitoring Your Health With Mobile Devices

New York Times: Dr. Eric Topol is only half joking when he says the smartphone is the future of medicine — because most of his patients already seem “surgically connected” to one.


But he says in all seriousness that the smartphone will be a sensor that will help people take better control of their health by tracking it with increasing precision. His book, “The Creative Destruction of Medicine,” lays out his vision for how people will start running common medical tests, skipping office visits and sharing their data with people other than their physicians.


Dr. Topol, a cardiologist and director of Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, Calif., is already seeing signs of this as companies find ways to hook medical devices to the computing power of smartphones. Devices to measure blood pressure, monitor blood sugar, hear heartbeats and chart heart activity are already in the hands of patients. More are coming.


Be sure and read Jon Mertz's review of Topol's great book: The Creative Destruction of Medicine.



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Children's hospital uses social media to address unthinkable

Children's hospital uses social media to address unthinkable | #HITsm | Scoop.it
Doernbecher Children's Hospital used Facebook and Twitter to address the unthinkable: a male nurse charged with downloading child pornography. (We can all learn from this.

Via Dean Berg
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When Gaming Is Good for You?

When Gaming Is Good for You? | #HITsm | Scoop.it

From The Wall Street Journal: A growing body of university research suggests that gaming improves creativity, decision-making and perception.

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