Hitchhiker
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Hitchhiker
Telling stories about the trips worth taking. Topics about transmedia, journalism, technology and art.
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Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from PHOTOGRAPHERS
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COAL MINES | Photographer: Ken Hermann

COAL MINES | Photographer:  Ken Hermann | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it

Based in Copenhagen, Ken Hermann works for a diverse range of clients amongst those leading brands, agencies and media corporations.
Ken Hermann has a degree in advertising photography and his work has been published by a number of magazines and exhibited around the world. His City Surfer project made him the winner of Hasselblad Masters 2012.
An urge to explore photography has brought Ken around the world, from secluded regions of India and Ethiopia to the big city landscapes of New York where he has worked for renowned photographers like Brigitte Lacombe and Asger Carlsen.
The life in the cities as well as in the more abandon places is a big inspirational source to Ken Hermann and he loves to combine his commercial work with his other true passion- to explore life, people, and cultures.

Ken Hermann works in the fields of portrait, editorial – and commercial photography. In 2012 he became a member of Getty Images and win the Hasselblad Masters 2012.


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Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from PHOTOGRAPHERS
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Lonely planet Kamagasaki | Photographer: Shiho Fukada

Lonely planet Kamagasaki | Photographer: Shiho Fukada | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it

“There is no work now. If big companies like Toyota are firing people, why should there be any work here for us? If big banks in the U.S. collapse, why should there be any work here for us? “  says Hiroshi Nakao, 59 year old, former construction day laborer, who currently survives by picking through garbage and selling what he can.  

 

He is one of the hundreds of graying men in Kamagasaki, Osaka, Japan. It used to be a thriving day laborer’s town. Today it is home to about 25,000 mainly elderly former day laborers, with an estimated 1,300 who are homeless. It used to be called a “laborers town” but now it’s called a “welfare town” – a dumping ground of old men.

 

Alcoholism, poverty, street death, suicide, TB and most of all loneliness prevail here. They don’t have family ties and live and die alone as social outcasts from the mainstream “salary man” culture."- Shiho Fukada


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