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Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Curation Revolution
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment] | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Minna Kilpeläinen's insight:

Thanks for the lesson, Marty!

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Peg Corwin's comment, March 10, 6:54 PM
Further to Therese Torris' comment, might we ask Scoop.it for a setting that allows us to choose to automatically tweet the post author when we re-scoop? It takes many clicks back and forth to get and add it.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 10, 7:06 PM
Yes @Peg Corwin I see your "filtering" much like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com work as providing value. As Brian shared he discard much more content than he is sharing. I think this builds on Robin's idea of "value" and its meaningful, fast and valuable to those who understand that filtering is the primary activity. I don't think its hard to know this since the second time a customer follows a link of yours or Brian's they know they are following your curation suggestion. On Sunday I thought "pass through" was an unsustainable model. After a day of #startup school I am not so sure. You and Brian are building a themed castle one brick (one share) at a time as surely as I am or anyone else using Scoop.it. Today it feels like a defined link share as you and Brian have described is a valuable service. <br><br>You've hit the primary value AND I often cut the middle man out (something it isn't hard to do ust use Google to search the title). Bryan (Dr V) was complaining about the extra click and that is why I sometimes jump past the pass through too, but since that jump isn't difficult and the oeuvre you create has merit as a whole I think we are simply approach the same problem with a slightly different approach (pass through vs. value add). I think you and Brian are SAVING TIME since you evaluate mor content than you share. <br><br>Despite Dr. V's complaint about seeing Scoop.it links I think that is an important signal and a signals that connects the IDEA of your curation as a whole, so I would say when you drive to Scoop.it using a Scoop.it moniker is a good idea. M
Peg Corwin's comment, March 11, 9:19 AM
Thanks Marty. I think indexing a topic like this adds value in a different way to the curation. http://website.pegcorwin.com/p/4010710384/2013/11/09/popular-topics
Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Design Revolution
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2013 Color Trends In Web Design

2013 Color Trends In Web Design | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
Just like every other element of web design, color palettes follow fads that are constantly evolving. This year’s color trends are as diverse as they are

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, May 23, 2013 4:08 PM

Great summary of evolving "color" best practices in web design.

Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Social Marketing Revolution
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How NOT to look Ugly on a Webcam | Infographic

How NOT to look Ugly on a Webcam | Infographic | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it

No matter who you are and how good you look, it’s pretty easy to look terrible on a webcam. We teamed up with our friends at Mixergy to showcase jus

Marty
Helpful tips here that will become increasingly important for everyone as we create Hangouts and develp more real time video.


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Minna Kilpeläinen's insight:

Useful tips.

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