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Hitchhiker
Telling stories about the trips worth taking. Topics about transmedia, journalism, technology and art.
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Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media

New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
Stop making Facebook the center of your relationship marketing efforts," says Nate Elliott, VP and principal analyst at Forrester.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 24, 11:25 AM

The research shared in this article is quite surprising.  The latest data shared from Forrester Research shows that top brands posting on Facebook and Twitter reach only about 2% of their audience. Engagement stats are even worse  -- a mere 0.07% of followers actually interact with posts.


Yikes!


And what does this have to do with business storytelling? Well, one thing it might be pointing to is that if you want to share and gather stories from audiences, social media might be the wrong place. Forrester concludes that the best way to engage  customers and prospects is through email.


We already know that blog posts, email and email newsletters allow for better storytelling  and are still very popular. You have more space, and can craft better stories. Social media posts are more like conversations, where stories may or may not show up. But  as we know, stories create higher engagement if you tap into the dynamic of story sharing (that means equal activity on both story listening and storytelling).


As we get more sophisticated in business storytelling, part of that maturity may be learning the best mediums for storytelling instead of thinking that every medium will work.


The recommendation about email makes sense to me. So you might want to read this article, understand a bit more about the research and recommendations, and go make adjustments accordingly.


What do you think about what this research says, and what will you be doing differently? Inquiring minds want to know ...


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Bonnie Sandy's curator insight, November 25, 2:27 PM

Communicating on social media is now everybody's busienss maybe they'll listen to Forrester research... 

Moya Sayer-Jones's curator insight, November 27, 5:36 PM

And maybe we could step into an even more traditional space than email to gather stories .....and actually talk to people. Now there's a novel idea! Hah!

Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from World's Best Infographics
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How women dominate social media | LeadersWest

How women dominate social media | LeadersWest | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
Women access social media via mobile devices more than men and are driving the growth of the visual social web.

 

The top three reasons Women dominate social media shared by Golden Girl Finance were:

‘Women not only use social media more often than men, but they use these sites in more ways’;‘Women are leading the trend of using their phones and tablets to check their social media accounts’; and,‘Women interact with brands more often and for a wider range of reasons and they consume and share news more frequently than men.’...
Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 18, 11:21 PM

With few exceptions (LinkedIn), women really do dominate social media. An excellent infographic.

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 18, 11:26 PM

Except for LinkedIn, women really do dominate the major social media channels.

Elsie Whitelock's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

Yup.

Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from World's Best Infographics
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Infographic: Why marketers choose certain colors

Infographic: Why marketers choose certain colors | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
This infographic explores the psychology of color and suggests why brands like McDonald’s and Pizza Hut prefer red whereas Lowe’s opts for blue.

Via Jeff Domansky
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WEDCBiz's curator insight, May 22, 2013 10:21 AM

Not that all of us agree with painting our daughters' rooms pink, but still, color is something we should consider when branding our small businesses.

Ali Anani's curator insight, May 23, 2013 12:16 AM

A must reading to know your feelings and feelings of others

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 23, 2013 5:12 PM

Red is a color that stimulates the appetite for food. Blue suppresses it.

Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Why is Empathy the Key to Good Storytelling? The Answers...

Why is Empathy the Key to Good Storytelling? The Answers... | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
In this guest post, the filmmakers of the forthcoming feature documentary, "My Country, No More" explain the importance of empathy in the storytelling process.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 1, 2:07 PM

Article link: 

http://www.indiewire.com/article/heres-why-empathy-is-the-key-to-good-storytelling-20140730?__scoop_post=cad53970-47e2-11e4-cc37-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582#__scoop_post=cad53970-47e2-11e4-cc37-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582


Here is a short post packed with great material. What is one of the main reasons a really good story works so well? Because it builds empathy.


But what is empathy? It's often easy to get empathy confused with sympathy. But the two are not the same.


Read this post to learn why empathy is so fundamental to good storytelling and insights into how to bring this into your business storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Curation Revolution
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment] | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Minna Kilpeläinen's insight:

Thanks for the lesson, Marty!

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...
Rescooped by Minna Kilpeläinen from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Power of Sequenced Content & Social Media for B2B Lead Generation -- Think Stories!

The Power of Sequenced Content & Social Media for B2B Lead Generation -- Think Stories! | Hitchhiker | Scoop.it
As a business journalist, I looked forward to information from a handful of specific sources each quarter. In fact, my quarterly e-commerce reports would wait

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 14, 2012 5:46 PM

Yeah -- what a great reminder! Craft your biz stories as sequenced content!


Better yet, plan a content campaign of sequential articles with a narrative arc.


Or serialize a narrative over several posts!


That is where my mind went after reading this article. Now the author here is really just talking about creating a series of posts over time all on the same topic that work together.


But my storytelling mind said "Woah! There is a lot more here that could be done." 


So this article presents a great idea -- but doesn't go quite far enough for all us biz storytellers. Yet it is still worth curating and reading because of all the tips and points it does make.


Dig in (it's not long), get the interesting stats showing how sequenced content gets results, and start connecting the stories together in a series of articles/blog posts, etc!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Karen Dietz's comment, December 15, 2012 1:52 PM
Thank you Beth for re-scooping this! And LOL, I see we both scooped the local stories piece from NPR. Great minds think alike!