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Did You Know? ~ Three Stories From 1890 Newspaper

Did You Know? ~ Three Stories From 1890 Newspaper | History & Romance | Scoop.it

I'm sitting on my bed tonight writing this blog article on my tiny laptop. Next to my laptop is a copy of theKanas City Daily Journal, dated Monday, April 21, 1890. Yes, it's that old, and seriously yellow and brittle. (I would probably be yellow and brittle if I were over one hundred years old, too.) Anyway, I think it's ironic to have something that old next to this modern technology.

I love old magazines and newspapers. I have framed several old papers because I like the way they look on the wall, and it keeps them safely intact. Surprisingly, there are many available for sale, and unless they are of historical significance, they are fairly inexpensive. Owning an old newspaper gives me a sense of awe. Over a hundred years ago someone bought this paper and read it. That person has been gone a long time, yet I'm holding the paper he or she read.

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Did You Know? ~ Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine

Did You Know? ~ Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine | History & Romance | Scoop.it

From the name NERVINE, you can guess one of the purposes of this medicine was to help nerves—nervous exhaustion, to be exact. It was also prescribed for headaches, insomnia, backaches, epilepsy, sexual dysfunction, and miscellaneous pains and spasms. Sounds like a miracle drug, doesn’t’ it? This product was sold until the mid-1960s.

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Did You Know? ~ Goldenseal

Did You Know? ~ Goldenseal | History & Romance | Scoop.it

When the settlers arrived to what would become America, they brought along European herbal medicines they knew and trusted. But soon, out of necessity, they had to learn about native medicinal plants. One of those herbs, already known by the native American Indians, was a woodland plant called goldenseal (Hydrastic Canadensis L.)

 Many Indian tribes used goldenseal. The Iroquois decocted the root to use for sour stomach, flatulence, pneumonia, fever, liver disease, and diarrhea. They combined it with whiskey for heart trouble. The Cherokee mixed the root powder with bear grease as insect repellent. They also used it as a wash for local inflammation. In decoctions, they used it for syspepsia and general debility. The Kickapoo Indians also used a cold water infusion of goldenseal for irritated eyes caused by autumn prairie fires. The Catawbas boiled the roots for stomach problems, colds and jaundice. Dye made from the bright yellow rhizome was used a dye for clothing and weapons

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Did You Know? ~ Sir George Grant and the Colony of Victoria

Did You Know? ~ Sir George Grant and the Colony of Victoria | History & Romance | Scoop.it

In spring 1872, Sir George Grant, a wealthy London silk merchant, toured the Great Plains looking for a place to retire. Toward the end of his journey, he passed by Fort Hays, Kansas, and traveled across Ellis County. He was spellbound by the endless, rolling prairies with their colorful flowers and grazing buffalo.

 Instead of buying property for himself, he negotiated with the Kansas Pacific Railroad and bought fifty thousand acres of land in eastern Ellis County to begin a colony for a contingent of his fellow Englishmen. He called it Victoria after Queen Victoria.
S. Dionne Moore's insight:

And English colony in 19th century United States?

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Did You Know? ~ Grasshopper Plague of 1874

Did You Know? ~ Grasshopper Plague of 1874 | History & Romance | Scoop.it

In August 1874, pioneer farmers in Kansas hoped that the year’s harvest would be prosperous. Wheat and oats were drying in the fields, awaiting harvest. Pasture land was lush and it appeared cattle would be fat and healthy. All was well for the people who had struggled against the elements to make homes in the vast prairie.

 Then a great, white glistening cloud appeared. Grasshoppers. So many of them, their wings caught the sunshine and made them look like a vapor cloud or sparkling snow. In some places they were so thick, they blocked the sun. Soon grasshoppers dropped from the sky, pelting the earth like snow or rain, piles of them, sometimes four inches or more. Soon they covered every inch of ground, and every plant and shrub. Branches of trees and shrubs broke under their weight. Garden plants were smashed flat. Then they started eating. Tobacco, corn, vegetables—nothing escaped the. . .

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Did You Know? ~ Milkweed as Medicine and Food

Did You Know? ~ Milkweed as Medicine and Food | History & Romance | Scoop.it

As a child, I spent many hours wandering the woods and swimming in creeks. I suspect that my generation of kids was the last who were let out of their parents’ sight all day, to go who-knows-where, as long as we were home for dinner.

 I collected tadpoles and salamanders. Unfortunately, I also killed them by trying to keep them as pets in jars at home. I also picked flowers, learned what poison ivy was, and collected leaves. One of the plants that fascinated me was milkweed. The prickly pod, considered the fruit, held seeds that were attached to lovely white, soft down (sometimes called floss) that flew in the air when I threw it. 

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Did You Know? ~ The First Ball Point Pen

Did You Know? ~ The First Ball Point Pen | History & Romance | Scoop.it

After last week’s article about homemade ink, I thought I’d follow up with some investigative work into the invention of the ball point pen. Surprisingly, the very first ball point pen was patented on October 30, 1888, by John J. Loud. His patent application suggested that his pen invention was useful “for marking on rough surfaces --  such as wood, coarse wrapping paper, and other articles – where an ordinary [fountain] pen could not be used.” Mr. Loud didn’t pursue his invention and made very few of his pens. His patent expired, and the ball point pen wasn’t mass produced until 57 years later, on October 29, 1945, when they went on sale in New York City.

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Did You Know? ~ The Death of Alexander the Great--A New Theory

Did You Know? ~ The Death of Alexander the Great--A New Theory | History & Romance | Scoop.it

The death of Alexander the Great is one of the greatest cold cases in history. At the time of his death in 323 BC Alexander was only 32 and controlled the largest empire in the world. He’d shown remarkable stamina during his life, which made him seem invincible. In 325 BC during a fight against South Asian warriors, Alexander had one of his lungs pierced by an arrow. Immediately afterward he made one of the most difficult of his military marches—a 60-day trek along the coast of what is now southern Iran.

 

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Did You Know? ~ Homemade Ink

Did You Know? ~ Homemade Ink | History & Romance | Scoop.it

This past weekend I was in Staples, one of my favorite stores. I spent a small fortune on ink for my printer. I also perused the pens, but couldn’t find one I liked. I’m persnickety about pens and only certain ones will do.

 So, as I was researching a topic for today’s blog, I came across some recipes for ink. I thought about my visit to Staples and how easy modern technology has made my job as an author.  I can type a digital document on my computer, send it across the room to my wireless printer, and it will print it out for me neatly and without splotches. Mistakes are easily remedied.

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Did You Know? ~ Cashews and Poison Ivy

Did You Know? ~ Cashews and Poison Ivy | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Cashews are one of my favorite kinds of nuts. I’ve been known to consume copious quantities of them if I’m left alone with an open can. So I was surprised to discover that cashew trees are botanically related to poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. 

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Did You Know? ~ The Death of Alexander the Great--A New Theory

Did You Know? ~ The Death of Alexander the Great--A New Theory | History & Romance | Scoop.it

The death of Alexander the Great is one of the greatest cold cases in history. At the time of his death in 323 BC Alexander was only 32 and controlled the largest empire in the world. He’d shown remarkable stamina during his life, which made him seem invincible. In 325 BC during a fight against South Asian warriors, Alexander had one of his lungs pierced by an arrow. Immediately afterward he made one of the most difficult of his military marches—a 60-day trek along the coast of what is now southern Iran.

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Did You Know?~The Candy Cane

Did You Know?~The Candy Cane | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered how candy canes came to be associated with Christmas? I decided to find out and discovered there are many legends, but few hard facts. 

 The most popular story of the origin of the candy cane is from 1670. A choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral in Germany handed out sugar sticks to his young singers to keep them quiet during the long living crèche ceremony. In honor of the occasion, and supposedly to remind them of the season, he had the candies bent into shepherds' crooks.
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Did You Know? ~ Hannah Duston (Part One)

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On an early spring day, March 15, 1697, forty-year-old Hannah Duston was at home recovering from the birth of her twelfth child. Her husband, Thomas, was working in the fields near their house on the west side of the Sawmill River in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Widowed nurse Mary Neff attended Hannah during her lying-in.

 Hannah and Thomas had been married for twenty years. Of the twelve children born to them, eight were living. Thomas was a bricklayer and a farmer. The family had prospered over the years, and Thomas was constructing a new house about half a mile from their present dwelling, using bricks of his own making. 
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Did You Know? ~ Siberian Mummies in Zeleniy Yar

Did You Know? ~ Siberian Mummies in Zeleniy Yar | History & Romance | Scoop.it

I love a good mystery, and when it involves the past, it’s even better. Here’s one I just read about.

 In Siberia, about 18 miles from the Arctic Circle, archaeologists have excavated 34 shallow graves at a place called Zeleniy Yar. They think the remote spot could have been an important trading crossroads about a thousand years ago.

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Poetry Writing Exercises to Engage the Senses

Poetry Writing Exercises to Engage the Senses | History & Romance | Scoop.it
These poetry writing exercises challenge you to engage your readers' senses in order to make a stronger and deeper impact with your writing.
S. Dionne Moore's insight:

Writing poetry is a great way to open a novelist's mind to the wonders of using all five senses to make a story that much richer.

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Did You Know? ~ Stormy Petrel

Did You Know? ~ Stormy Petrel | History & Romance | Scoop.it

On November 16, 1871, a blizzard abruptly roared out of warm autumn skies on the plains of Kansas. The snow continued for three days. Many helpless travelers were caught in the storm. Among them was a young, recently married woman from England.

 This young woman, known only by a story told years later by Kansas resident Annie Gilkeson,was nicknamed Stormy Petrel. She had come to American from England with her brothers after her father lost his wealth to drinking. Stormy and her brothers settled in Kansas. Soon she fell in love with another settler from England, and they married.
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Did You Know? ~ The Versatile Cattail

Did You Know? ~ The Versatile Cattail | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Last week I mentioned how I used to wander the countryside when I was a kid. One of the features I remember is a small pond in the meadow next to the woods. The pond was filled with cattail plants. I used to love it when the brown cattail seed pods were ready to pop. I’d grab them, split them open, and watch the fuzzy seed head fluff fly in the air. But I had no idea that the cattail plant is one of the most versatile of wild plants.

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Amazon.com: Promise of Yesterday (Truly Yours Digital Editions) eBook: S. Dionne Moore: Kindle Store

Escaping the horrors of slavery, Chester Jones returns home after many years. After meeting the enigmatic Marylu, sparks fly as he gently pushes his way into her heart. As love blossoms, secrets from Marylu’s past arise, causing her to question her newfound feelings. And then what about those rumors linking Chester to a murder. . .? Will Marylu allow God to heal her heart or will it be shattered again

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Historical Romance Book Spotlight ~ Forget Me Not

Historical Romance Book Spotlight ~ Forget Me Not | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Old hurts, new betrayals, and a love that survives them all...

Summer 1885

A startling revelation sends Elizabeth Lawson escaping into a stormy night - and tosses her into the arms of a young mountain man with secrets of his own. When he offers to take her to the Nevada mining town where her long-lost brother lives, she accepts. Suspicions and uncertainties are pushed aside as she struggles to forge a future for herself by meeting her past. 

David has been hiding from his painful memories for years. The solitude and wildness of the Rocky Mountains are challenge and comfort enough for him - until Elizabeth's arrival. Fueled by anger and a sense of obligation, he strives to take control of his new situation...only to find control slipping from his g

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Books by S. Dionne Moore

Books by S. Dionne Moore | History & Romance | Scoop.it

When fiery Renee Dover searches for a gang of outlaws, she never expects to find them. Captured by the gang—and certain her recklessness has gotten her brother killed—she escapes. . .right into the arms of Tyler Sperry, a quiet sheepherder with a mysterious past. Can Tyler decide what to do with Renee when every option he sees risks her life—or challenges his? And can Renee discover what this shepherd has found that she strangely desires?

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Historical Romance Book Review ~ The Dancing Master

Historical Romance Book Review ~ The Dancing Master | History & Romance | Scoop.it

About the Book

"Finding himself the man of the family, London dancing master Alec Valcourt moves his mother and sister to remote Devonshire, hoping to start over. But he is stunned to learn the village matriarch has prohibited all dancing, for reasons buried deep in her past.

Alec finds an unlikely ally in the matriarch’s daughter. Though he’s initially wary of Julia Midwinter’s reckless flirtation, he comes to realize her bold exterior disguises a vulnerable soul–and hidden sorrows of her own.

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Did You Know? ~ Dropsy

Did You Know? ~ Dropsy | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Dropsy was a medical term used in the nineteenth century for an accumulation of excess water in the body that swelled the soft tissues, often due to congestive heart failure, or an inability of the kidneys and liver to cleanse the system.  

 The etymology of the word dropsy is interesting.  On one site I read that people with dropsy were prone to dropping things because the brain was also affected by the swelling, causing neurological side effects—thus the term dropsy. Another site said the word dropsy came from the Middle English word dropesie. That came through the Old French hydropsie from the Greek hydrops, which in turn came from the Green hydor, meaning water. (The word "dropsy" was first used in popular English literature sometime before 1321.)
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Did You Know? ~ An Old Fashioned Cure for Locked Jaw

Did You Know? ~ An Old Fashioned Cure for Locked Jaw | History & Romance | Scoop.it

I recently acquired a book called, The Circle of Useful Knowledge: For the use of Farmers, Mechanics, Merchants, Manufacturers, Surveyors, Housekeepers, Professional Men, Etc., Etc., Etc. (Yes, that’s really the title.) It was written and published in 1877 by Charles Kinsley. Over the next few weeks, I’d like to share some of the more interesting things contained therein. 

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Did You Know? ~ Hannah Dustin (Part Two)

Did You Know? ~ Hannah Dustin (Part Two) | History & Romance | Scoop.it

Last week I featured the first part of Hannah Duston’s story (click to link to read it). The forty-year-old mother of twelve children (eight living) had been snatched from her home by Indians during her “lying in” period after giving birth to a baby girl. Local widow Mary Neff was attending Hannah at the time. Hannah’s husband, Thomas, and their other children made it to a garrison safely, but Hannah, Mrs. Neff, and baby Martha were taken hostage.

 After plundering the house and capturing the two women, the Indians took their captives and sped away, fearing pursuit. Because of the baby, Hannah was unable to run as quickly as the Indians wished, so they seized the infant and dashed her against a tree, killing her. 

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