History Of Ku Klux Klan
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Vocabulary

Vocabulary | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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Repertoire----->a stock of plays, dances, or pieces that a company or a performer knows or is prepared to perform. The whole body of items that are regularly performed. 

----->The mainstream concert repertoire.


Domination----> The exercise of control or influence over someone or something, or thestate of being so controlled. 

------>Evil plans for domination of the universe.


KKK----> An extremist right-wing secret society in the US.

-----> The KKK is a violent Group that hurts others.


Cloaking ----> An outdoor overgarment, typically sleeveless, that hangs loosely from the shoulders.

 -----> something serving to hide or disguise something: lifting the cloak of secrecy on the arms trade.


Constantly----> Continuously over a period of time.

------>Always: the world is constantly changing |he was constantly on her mind.

 

Collective-----> Done by people acting as a group: a collective protest.

 ------>Belonging or relating to all the members of a group: ministers who share collective responsibility 


Ritual-----> A religious or solemn ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according to a prescribed order. 

--->The ancient rituals of Christian worship 


Associated ----> Of a person or thing connected with something else: two associated events.

 -----> Of a company connected or amalgamated with another company orcompanies.


Dixon ------>Dixon is an alternative to Dickson. It is of English origin meaning son of Richard, or Dick's son.

   The dixon to Dickson was in the english origin.


Homogenous----> Of the same kind; alike: timbermen prefer to deal with homogeneous woods. 

  ------>Consisting of parts all of the same kind: culturally speaking the farmers constitute an extremely homogeneous group.

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Sheriff Responds To Uproar After KKK Photos Surface #2

Sheriff Responds To Uproar After KKK Photos Surface #2 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
A Georgia sheriff seeking re-election this year responded to an embarrassing moment from his past after old photos of him dressed in a Ku Klux Klan robe and hood surfaced.
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Ku Klux Klan Issues

Ku Klux Klan Issues | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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Founded in 1866, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) extended into almost every southern state by 1870 and became a vehicle for white southern resistance to the Republican Party's Reconstruction-era policies aimed at establishing political and economic equality for blacks. Its members waged an underground campaign of intimidation and violence directed at white and black Republican leaders. Though Congress passed legislation designed to curb Klan terrorism, the organization saw its primary goal–the reestablishment of white supremacy–fulfilled through Democratic victories in state legislatures across the South in the 1870s. After a period of decline, white Protestant nativist groups revived the Klan in the early 20th century, burning crosses and staging rallies, parades and marches denouncing immigrants, Catholics, Jews, blacks and organized labor. The civil rights movement of the 1960s also saw a surge of Ku Klux Klan activity, including bombings of black schools and churches and violence against black and white activists in the South.

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Ku Klux Klan News - The New York Times Issue Today #1

Ku Klux Klan News - The New York Times Issue Today #1 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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News about the Ku Klux Klan. Commentary and archival information about the Ku Klux Klan from The New York Times.

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The violence of the Ku Klux Klan Primary Document #2

The violence of the Ku Klux Klan Primary Document #2 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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 Annotation: The KKK is a violence and most infamous. They were a very rasict group who did alot of  violence things, by burning people , hurting and disrespecting people The Ku Klux Klan, with its long history of violence, is the most infamous - and oldest - of American hate groups. Although black Americans have typically been the Klan's primary target, it also has attacked Jews, immigrants, gays and lesbians and, until recently, Catholics. Over the years since it was formed in December 1865, the Klan has typically seen itself as a Christian organization, although in modern times Klan groups are motivated by a variety of theological and political ideologies.

Started during Reconstruction at the end of the Civil War, the Klan quickly mobilized as a vigilante group to intimidate Southern blacks - and any whites who would help them - and to prevent them from enjoying basic civil rights. Outlandish titles (like imperial wizard and exalted cyclops), hooded costumes, violent "night rides," and the notion that the group comprised an "invisible empire" conferred a mystique that only added to the Klan's popularity. Lynchings, tar-and-featherings, rapes and other violent attacks on those challenging white supremacy became a hallmark of the Klan.

After a short but violent period, the "first era" Klan disbanded after Jim Crow laws secured the domination of Southern whites. But the Klan enjoyed a huge revival in the 1920s when it opposed (mainly Catholic and Jewish) immigration. By 1925, when its followers staged a huge Washington, D.C., march, the Klan had as many as 4 million members and, in some states, considerable political power. But a series of sex scandals, internal battles over power and newspaper exposés quickly reduced its influence.

The Klan arose a third time during the 1960s to oppose the civil rights movement and to preserve segregation in the face of unfavorable court rulings. The Klan's bombings, murders and other attacks took a great many lives, including, among others, four young girls killed while preparing for Sunday services at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala.

Since the 1970s the Klan has been greatly weakened by internal conflicts, court cases, a seemingly endless series of splits and government infiltration. While some factions have preserved an openly racist and militant approach, others have tried to enter the mainstream, cloaking their racism as mere "civil rights for whites." Today, the Center estimates that there are between 5,000 and 8,000 Klan members, split among dozens of different - and often warring - organizations that use the Klan name.

Klan glossary

AKIA: A password meaning "A Klansman I Am", often seen on decals and bumper stickers.

Alien: A person who does not belong to the Klan.

AYAK?: A password meaning "Are You a Klansman?"

CA BARK: A password meaning "Constantly Applied By All Real Klansmen."

CLASP: A password meaning "Clannish Loyalty A Sacred Principle."

Genii: The collective name for the national officers. Also known as the Kloncilium, or the advisory board to the Imperial Wizard.

Hydras: The Real officers, with the exception of the Grand Dragon.

Imperial Giant: Former Imperial Wizard.

Imperial Wizard: The overall, or national, head of a Klan, which it sometimes compares to the president of the United States.

Inner Circle: Small group of four or five members who plan and carry out "action." Its members and activities are not disclosed to the general membership.

Invisible Empire: A Ku Klux Klan's overall geographical jurisdiction, which it compares to the United States although none exist in every state.

Kalendar: Klan calendar, which dates events from both the origin and its 1915 rebirth Anno Klan, and means "in the year of the Klan," and is usually written "AK."

Kardinal Kullors: White, crimson, gold and black. Secondary Kullors are grey, green and blue. The Imperial Wizard's Kullor is Skipper Blue.

K.B.I.: Klan Bureau of Investigation.

KIGY!: A password meaning "Klansman, I greet you!"

Klankfraft: The practices and beliefs of the Klan.

Klanton: The jurisdiction of a Klavern.

Klavern: A local unit or club; also called "den."

Kleagle: An organizer whose main function is to recruit new members. In some Klans, he gets a percentage of the initiation fees.

Klectokon: Initiation fee.

Klepeer: Delegate elected to Imperial Klonvokation.

Klonkave: Secret Klavern meeting.

Klonverse: Province convention.

Kloran: Official book of Klan rituals.

Klorero: Realm convention.

SAN BOG: A password meaning "Strangers Are Near, Be On Guard."

Terrors: The Exalted Cyclops' officers.

 

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Taquan Kelly's curator insight, February 26, 2015 10:01 AM

This passage is a description of the Ku Klux Klan stating what they use to do and why they use to do it. Their group still exist to this day.

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Alleged Ohio KKK Member Arrested For Threatening Black Man #3

Alleged Ohio KKK Member Arrested For Threatening Black Man #3 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
By Kim Palmer CLEVELAND, March 28 (Reuters) - A man wearing Ku Klux Klan clothing was arrested in the small community of Mount Victory, Ohio over the weekend after he threatened a black man with a gun and said he would kill him,...
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Pragmatic Racism #1

Pragmatic Racism #1 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
Winning -- securing power, implementing their agenda -- is the whole point, and that means they have no choice but to put the big squeeze on Democrat-leaning voting blocs. And the most obvious of those blocs are racial and ethnic.
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Georgia: In Suing State, A.C.L.U. Defends Klan Issue Today #2

Georgia: In Suing State, A.C.L.U. Defends Klan Issue Today #2 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against Georgia on Thursday for denying the Ku Klux Klan’s application to participate in an “adopt a highway” program.

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Burn On The Cross Primary Source #3

Burn On The Cross Primary Source #3 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
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Annotation: The Triple "K" did not believe that blacks should be free, and went around with white outfits, and white cones on their heads, killing blacks. They are still around today. A group called the KKK had formed after the civil war. It was a group in the south and their main purpose was to show that whites were still superior to other races. This group had a passionate hatred towards the blacks. Klansmen killed over 150 African Americans in one Florida county. They wore white robes and masks over their faces to conceal their identity. They would shoot into peoples houses, burn their houses down and lynch families of blacks. basically they hated the blacks and a little while after they started to hate catholics and Jews too.The 

 

 

 Supreme Court recently heard arguments in Virginia v. Black that will determine whether cross-burning qualifies as protected speech under the First Amendment. The Ku Klux Klan, the organization most closely associated with burning crosses, identifies itself as Christian. Why do they incinerate their faith's most sacred symbol?

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The practice dates back to Medieval Europe, an era the Klan idealizes as morally pure and racially homogenous. In the days before floodlights, Scottish clans set hillside crosses ablaze as symbols of defiance against military rivals or to rally troops when a battle was imminent. Though the original Klan, founded in 1866, patterned many of its rituals after those of Scottish fraternal orders, cross-burning was not part of its initial repertoire of terror.

Nevertheless, Thomas Dixon included a pivotal cross-burning scene in his 1905 novel The Clansman; he was attempting to legitimize the Klan's supposed connections to the Scottish clans. A decade later, D.W. Griffith brought The Clansman to the silver screen, eventually renaming it The Birth of a Nation. Exhilarated by Griffith's sympathetic portrayal, Klansmen started burning crosses soon afterto intimidate minorities, Catholics, and anyone else suspected of betraying the order's ideals. The first reported burning took place in Georgia on Thanksgiving Eve, 1915. They have been associated with racist violence ever since.

Modern Klan groups are careful to refer to their ritual as "cross lighting" rather than cross-burning and insist that their fires symbolize faith in Christ. The days of so-called disciplinary burnings, they add, are long since over. Still, nearly 1,700 cross-burnings have been documented since the late 1980s, many of them in the front yards of African-American families—although, in all fairness, the majority have been carried out by lone racist yahoos, rather than by organized Klan groups.

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The Ku Klux Klan Primary Document #1

The Ku Klux Klan Primary Document #1 | History Of Ku Klux Klan | Scoop.it
damarcus crayton's insight:

Anotation: The Ku Klux Klan is a racist, anti-Semitic movement with a commitment to extreme violence to achieve its goals of racial segregation and white supremacy. Of all the types of right-wing hate groups that exist in the United States, the Klan remains the one with the greatest number of national and local organizations around the country. 



When the KKK started more than 40 different Klan groups exist, many having multiple chapters, or “klaverns,” including a few that boast a presence in a large number of states. There are over a hundred different Klan chapters around the country, with a combined strength of members and associates that may total around 5,000. 

After a period of relative quiet, Ku Klux Klan activity has spiked noticeably upwards in 2006, as Klan groups have attempted to exploit fears in America over gay marriage, perceived “assaults” on Christianity, crime and especially immigration. 


KKK SymbolFounder: Confederate Civil War veterans Captain John C. Lester, Major James R. Crowe, John D. Kennedy, Calvin Jones, Richard R. Reed, Frank O. McCord
Founded: 1866
Headquarters: Each different Klan group has its own headquarters.
Background: The Klan has fragmented into more than 40 separate factions of varying sizes. There is no “one” Ku Klux Klan.
Estimated size: There are over a hundred different chapters in the various Klan organizations, with varying memberships. Overall, there may be as many as 5,000 members and associates of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan is strongest in the South and in the Midwest.
Criminal Activity: The Klan has a relatively high association with criminal activity, ranging from hate crimes to acts of domestic terrorism.
Media: Mass mailings, leafleting and the Internet
Strategy: Public rallies and protests, "adopt a highway" programs and other attention getting stunts, Internet
Ideology: White supremacist ideology not far from that of neo-Nazis, although it tends to be more Christian-oriented and to stress nativism. 
Affiliations: National Socialist Movement, Aryan Nations, Christian Identity groups
Financial support: Little. Most funding comes from membership dues and sales of Klan paraphernalia.


The Ku Klux Klan first emerged following the Civil War as America’s first true terrorist group. Since its inception, the Ku Klux Klan has seen several cycles of growth and collapse, and in some of these cycles the Klan has been more extreme than in others. In all of its incarnations, however, the Klan has maintained its dual heritage of hate and violence. 

At first, the Ku Klux Klan focused its anger and violence on African-Americans, on white Americans who stood up for them, and against the federal government which supported their rights. Subsequent incarnations of the Klan, which typically emerged in times of rapid social change, added more categories to its enemies list, including Jews, Catholics (less so after the 1970s), homosexuals, and different groups of immigrants. 

In most of these cases, these perceived enemies were minority groups that came into direct economic competition with the lower- and working-class whites that formed the core constituency of the Klan in most of its incarnations. 

The Ku Klux Klan was overshadowed in the late 1990s and early 2000s by growing neo-Nazi activity; however, by 2005 neo-Nazi groups had fallen on hard times, with many groups collapsing or fragmenting. This collapse has helped create a rise of racist skinhead activity, but has also provided new opportunities for Klan groups. 

In addition, in the early 2000s, many communities in the United States began to experiences a significant influx of immigrants, especially Hispanics, for the first time in their histories. A single-issue movement opposing immigration has helped create fear and anxiety about immigration in the minds of many Americans. 

Many Ku Klux Klan groups have attempted to take advantage of that fear and uncertainty, using anti-immigration sentiments for recruitment and propaganda purposes, and to attract publicity. 

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