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History & Maps
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Timeline Maps – the cartography of Time | Hector Lima

Timeline Maps – the cartography of Time | Hector Lima | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Mapping history: http://t.co/rIR0d3OI VERY cool and great visuals #history #maps...
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American Migration - Interactive Map

American Migration - Interactive Map | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Americans are enormously mobile: 37.5 million people moved from one house to another last year, with 4.3 million of them moving between states. This mobility makes us efficient seekers of economic improvement—moving into, and then leaving, cities like Phoenix as their fortunes rise and fall.

This interactive visualization, based on IRS data, illustrates these patterns by tracing inward and outward moves for every county in the country. Each move had its own motivations, but in aggregate they ­reflect the geographical marketplace during the boom and bust of the last decade: Migrants flock to Las Vegas in 2005 in search of cheap, luxurious housing, then flee in 2009 as the city’s economy collapses; Miami beckons retirees from the North but offers little to its working-age residents, who leave for the West. Even fast-growing boomtowns like Charlotte, N.C., lose residents to their outlying counties as the demand for exurban tract-housing pushes workers ever outward.


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Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise

Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Acts of violence against Muslim Americans and their houses of worship have increased, especially in the weeks since Ramadan began this year.

 

Tags: religion, Islam, culture, conflict, terrorism, unit 3 culture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Tots els huracans des de 1851, en un mapa

Tots els huracans des de 1851, en un mapa | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Hi apareixen totes les tempestes tropicals i huracans que la National Oceanic and Athmospheric Administration (NOAA) té enregistrats als seus arxius des de 1851, amb el recorregut i la intenstat.


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Map My Followers

Map My Followers | History & Maps | Scoop.it

This is a great site that combines the power of geography and social media.  You can map where your twitter followers are (if they make the data publicly available).  Additionally, you can pan, zoom and identify specific followers.  Can you find yourself on this map (followers of @APHumanGeog)? 

 

(While I have your attention), thanks to my over 425 Twitter followers and thank you all for making this 'Geography Education' site get over 10,000 hits in less than two months!  Thank you for spreading the word to other geographers and educators.    

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Wheel Of Fortune

Wheel Of Fortune | History & Maps | Scoop.it

A flash resource to help teach probability in maths. Use the spinner to tally the colours that appear. The resource allows you to spin individual spins or up to 1000 spins at a time.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths

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Idea Mapping Guidelines vs. Mind Mapping Laws – Debunking the 1 Word Per Line Law | Idea Mapping

Idea Mapping Guidelines vs. Mind Mapping Laws – Debunking the 1 Word Per Line Law | Idea Mapping | History & Maps | Scoop.it
On May 7, 2012 I wrote a post about Idea Mapping Guidelines vs. Mind Mapping Laws.

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Information graphics: beauty can wait

Information graphics: beauty can wait | History & Maps | Scoop.it

TAKEAWAY: Alberto Cairo is a journalistic visualizer with an eye for beauty but two hands on function. We talk to Cairo about the roles of function and beauty in information graphics and showcase his new book, The Functional Art.


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David Rumsey Historical Map Collection | The Collection

David Rumsey Historical Map Collection | The Collection | History & Maps | Scoop.it
  Welcome to the David Rumsey Map Collection Database and Blog. The Map Database has many viewers and the Blog has numerous categories. The historical map collection has over 34,000 maps and images...
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Interactive Inspiration [6] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [6] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Some of the most interesting interactive graphics published during the week...

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | History & Maps | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:57 PM

Great tool to show students how human use of natural resources can change landscapes and have permanent impacts on geographical landmarks such as the aerial sea. How do we stop it? Can we undo the damage done? How do we prevent these tragedies from happening in the future?

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | History & Maps | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | History & Maps | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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The Geography of the 47%

The Geography of the 47% | History & Maps | Scoop.it
The states with the highest share of tax non-payers may actually contain the very conservative votes that Romney needs.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 


Via Seth Dixon, M. Roman
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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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The 3D atlas of the human brain | Visual Loop

The 3D atlas of the human brain | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
A new set of resources to explore the mysteries of the brain...

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The New World

The New World | History & Maps | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | History & Maps | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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360 Degree Aerial Panoramas

360 Degree Aerial Panoramas | History & Maps | Scoop.it

A stunning collection of aerial 360 degree images from famous locations from around the world. Peer down at the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong harbour or the tranquil scenery of Fiordland in New Zealand. Each HD image can be rotated and you can zoom in to see the details in finer clarity. You can even embed a rotating image on to your site.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Photos+%26+Images

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Sketchometry

Sketchometry | History & Maps | Scoop.it

This site is an amazing geometry playground for maths students and teachers. Select points on your screen and connect them up to provide the properties you what. This resource uses HTML5 and works wonderfully across a range of computers, browsers and tablets.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths

 

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