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Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Dozens of interactive infographics from all over the world for your inspiration...

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BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com)

BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com) | History & Maps | Scoop.it

This site transposed global events or features (e.g.-If the Great Wall of China were in Europe, how many countries would it go through?) and placing that event on a portion of the Earth more familiar to students to help them relate more to the magnitude of global news. 


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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | History & Maps | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 8:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 7:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

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The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine

The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine | History & Maps | Scoop.it

The shape of a state can greatly impact the political cohesion of a country as well as it's economic viability.  While this is obviously a fictitious map, it draws our attention to the logistic difficulties that confront Palestine with the Israelis controlling crucial transportation access points and corridors.   

 

Questions to Ponder:  How is the a 'persuasive map?' What are some of the geographic impacts of this fragmentation on Palestine? For Israel?

 

Tags: cartography, MiddleEast, political, states, territoriality, unit 4 political.


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Melissa Burr's comment, October 10, 2012 7:13 AM
This map is persuasive because it does not show the usual Palestine. This map is fragmented and the geographic impacts it shows are the routes taken in at leisure for maritime activity and also shows the urban and popluated areas in the past and how how the sraelites impact those areas.
Matthew Jones's comment, October 10, 2012 7:16 AM
The reason this is a persuasive map in my opinion is that this map does a very good job of allowing the reader to understand the focus in which it intends to present. information key which it offers is crucial to the map b/ it help the reader better understand and analyze this map in its entirety. as far As the second question unfortunately I am not very knowledgeable as far as the impact his map as on palestiine or isreal.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 10, 2012 8:24 AM
This map is unique and not typical. The way that Palestine's land is severed and each transportation access point is clearly shown and highlighted, makes this map's data very persuasive and impactful. This map examines the Israelis' control of the land.
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Lies, damn lies, and visualizations - Strata

Lies, damn lies, and visualizations - Strata | History & Maps | Scoop.it
There's nothing wrong with taking a strong position, assuming the underlying data and facts are accurate.

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Edcanvas

Edcanvas | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Create an interactive online lesson with this brilliant site. Upload and curate all the resources for a lesson in one place and access them with one click. The site works with Office files, PDFs, flash files, small videos file, images, Youtube videos, internet links and even connects to Google Drive and Dropbox. Then simply share the link with anyone who need to use view it.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Planning+%26+Assessment

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A+ Click Math

A+ Click Math | History & Maps | Scoop.it

This great maths site has an amazing collection of maths self-marking problem solving questions. Search by age level or topic. This covers both Primary and Secondary levels. Topics include numbers, geometry, algebra, data analysis, probability and more.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths

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Edcanvas

Edcanvas | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Create an interactive online lesson with this brilliant site. Upload and curate all the resources for a lesson in one place and access them with one click. The site works with Office files, PDFs, flash files, small videos file, images, Youtube videos, internet links and even connects to Google Drive and Dropbox. Then simply share the link with anyone who need to use view it.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+%26+Web+Tools

 

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50_Years_Space_Exploration1.jpg (3861x1706 pixels)

50_Years_Space_Exploration1.jpg (3861x1706 pixels) | History & Maps | Scoop.it
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Timeline Maps – the cartography of Time | Hector Lima

Timeline Maps – the cartography of Time | Hector Lima | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Mapping history: http://t.co/rIR0d3OI VERY cool and great visuals #history #maps...
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American Migration - Interactive Map

American Migration - Interactive Map | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Americans are enormously mobile: 37.5 million people moved from one house to another last year, with 4.3 million of them moving between states. This mobility makes us efficient seekers of economic improvement—moving into, and then leaving, cities like Phoenix as their fortunes rise and fall.

This interactive visualization, based on IRS data, illustrates these patterns by tracing inward and outward moves for every county in the country. Each move had its own motivations, but in aggregate they ­reflect the geographical marketplace during the boom and bust of the last decade: Migrants flock to Las Vegas in 2005 in search of cheap, luxurious housing, then flee in 2009 as the city’s economy collapses; Miami beckons retirees from the North but offers little to its working-age residents, who leave for the West. Even fast-growing boomtowns like Charlotte, N.C., lose residents to their outlying counties as the demand for exurban tract-housing pushes workers ever outward.


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"Million" Cities | History & Maps

"Million" Cities | History & Maps | History & Maps | Scoop.it
From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.
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Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise

Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Acts of violence against Muslim Americans and their houses of worship have increased, especially in the weeks since Ramadan began this year.

 

Tags: religion, Islam, culture, conflict, terrorism, unit 3 culture.


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On Web Mapping | Scoop.it

On Web Mapping | Scoop.it | History & Maps | Scoop.it
All Things Web Mapping...

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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | History & Maps | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 6:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 7:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 5:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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Interactive Inspiration [9] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [9] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Another huge selection of interactive goodies published recently...

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Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Dozens of interactive infographics from all over the world for your inspiration...

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10 Interactive Timelines to Inspire Your Content Marketing

10 Interactive Timelines to Inspire Your Content Marketing | History & Maps | Scoop.it

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A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts

A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts | History & Maps | Scoop.it

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Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [7] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Dozens of interactive infographics from all over the world for your inspiration...

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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | History & Maps | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


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David Rumsey Historical Map Collection | The Collection

David Rumsey Historical Map Collection | The Collection | History & Maps | Scoop.it
  Welcome to the David Rumsey Map Collection Database and Blog. The Map Database has many viewers and the Blog has numerous categories. The historical map collection has over 34,000 maps and images...
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Interactive Inspiration [6] | Visual Loop

Interactive Inspiration [6] | Visual Loop | History & Maps | Scoop.it
Some of the most interesting interactive graphics published during the week...

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | History & Maps | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:14 PM

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 9:46 AM

This map is a true testament to the people who believe human activity does not affect the earth. Humans have been transforming Earth’s surface for years, through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate. Much of the transformation taking place in the Aral sea leads to its connection to the Soviet era and their lack of understanding of the environment. This mismanagement of the Aral Sea is leading to a lack of water for the people who live in Central Asia.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:30 AM

The colors seen in photographs and images like this is because of the equipment used. Sometimes the quality of the equipment makes the pictures look different than they actually are. This basin has dried up over time and its surface has signs of significant change.

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | History & Maps | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 8:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | History & Maps | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 10:51 AM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.