History- Early Explorers
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Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery

Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery | History- Early Explorers | Scoop.it

"Last week Glenn Wiebe http://ow.ly/foKFR ; published a list of iPad apps for history teachers. One item in that list that was new to me was European Exploration: The Age of Discovery http://ow.ly/foKC6   This free iPad app puts students in charge of exploring the "New World." In the game students are in charge of selecting explorers and ships to send out to the New World. Students have to manage the finances of their expeditions so that they don't run out of money before they can return home safely."


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(EN)-(€) - Amazon.com: Encyclopedia of the Environment in American Literature | Geoff Hamilton, Brian Jones

Encyclopedia of the Environment in American Literature

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"This encyclopedia introduces readers to American poetry, fiction and nonfiction with a focus on the environment (broadly defined as humanity's natural surroundings), from the discovery of America through the present. The work includes biographical and literary entries on material from early explorers and colonists such as Columbus, Bartolome de Las Casas and Thomas Harriot; Native American creation myths; canonical 18th- and 19th-century works of Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Hawthorne, Twain, Dickinson and others; to more recent figures such as Jack London, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Stanley Cavell, Rachel Carson, Jon Krakauer and Al Gore. It is meant to provide a synoptic appreciation of how the very concept of the environment has changed over the past five centuries, offering both a general introduction to the topic and a valuable resource for high school and university courses focused on ..."


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Uber, Data Darwinism and the future of work | GigaOM Tech News

Uber, Data Darwinism and the future of work | GigaOM Tech News | History- Early Explorers | Scoop.it

A year ago, I hosted a small conclave of fellow (early) explorers of the post-html Internet. And while we are not of the SnapChat generation, most of us grew up connected. There were some who helped build the gear that runs the post-1999 Internet, and some who built the space ships. A neuroscientists who studies mobile and online behaviors, a digital musican and a music enterprenuer; data nerds, visual designers and an infrastructure wizard  who streams happiness  one stream at a time. And then there was me, who starts the day connected and ends it connected.

 

Connectendess — which is state of always being connected to the Internet and thus to people, things, life, work, commerce, love, hate and anger – is the single thought that dominates my mind, and it defines how I view everything, how I evaluate everything. It is my telescope and it is my microscope. I don’t see the world in silos called mobile, broadband, browser, app or television. Instead, it is all about being in the state of connectedness. I wanted to pick their brain about how the state of connectedness was going to change the future and redefine society itself.

 

While there were dozens of takeaways from the day-long idea fest, here’s what has stayed front-and-center in my mind: the challenges of the connected future are less technical and more legislative, political and philsophical. The shift from a generation that started out un-connected to one that is growing up connected will result in conflicts, disruption and eventually the redrawing of our societal expectations. The human race has experienced these shifts before — just not at the speed and scale of this shift.

 

The coming intellectual and societal upheaval brought on by the state of connectedness is aptly reflected in the recent fracas between Uber, a San Francisco-based personal transportation platform, and the freelance army of drivers who man its cars. They were protesting what they thought was unfair treatment by the company. ”They’re running a sweatshop with an app. They don’t have the balls to come down and talk to us,” Raj Alazzeh, a driver with SF Best Limo and a spokesperson for the drivers, told Liz Gannes. “Uber chooses to call us partners for their tax benefit. If they called us employees, they’d have to cover us all.”

 

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Students Become World Explorers With This App

Students Become World Explorers With This App | History- Early Explorers | Scoop.it

"European Exploration: The Age of Discovery is a free iPad app that puts students in charge of exploring the “New World.” In the game students are in charge of selecting explorers and ships to send out to the New World. Students have to manage the finances of their expeditions so that they don’t run out of money before they can return home safely."


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Ancient Voyages to America - Who Were The First Explorers? (Documentary)

Who were the first people to discover America? Historical evidence uncovers the myth of Christopher Columbus being the first to America. This documentary exp...
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Martian Visitations

Part of DARPA's Project Pegasus as a young child and now a practicing attorney, Andrew D. Basiago claims to be one of America's early time-space explorers. A...

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