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How deadly was the poison gas of WW1? - BBC News

How deadly was the poison gas of WW1? - BBC News | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Gas terrified soldiers in WW1, but it killed comparatively few of them, at least on the Western Front. So why was it the one WW1 weapon to be banned?

Via Kent College History, Jukka Melaranta
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Kent College History's curator insight, November 21, 3:01 AM
'The first major gas attack in war occurred 100 years ago this weekend, in what is now Poland. Gas soon became a routine feature of trench warfare, horrifying soldiers more than any conventional weapon. But was it actually as deadly as its terrible reputation suggests?'
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Riot police move in on North Dakota pipeline protesters - BBC News

Riot police move in on North Dakota pipeline protesters - BBC News | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Riot police arrest 141 protesters blocking the path of the Dakota Access pipeline.

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Ben Salve's curator insight, November 11, 6:23 AM
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US Revives War on Native Americans in North Dakota

US Revives War on Native Americans in North Dakota | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Camp leaders have cited the tribe’s right to the disputed land under the 1851 Treaty of Ft. Laramie. “This is unceded land,” they declared.

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Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

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The other Asian tiger

The other Asian tiger | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"Vietnam's success merits a closer look."

 

Which Asian country has roared ahead over the past quarter-century, with millions of its people escaping poverty? And which Asian economy, still mainly rural, will be the continent’s next dynamo? Most would probably respond “China” to the first question and “India” to the second. But these answers would overlook a country that, in any other part of the world, would stand out for its past success and future promise.

Vietnam, with a population of more than 90m, has notched up the world’s second-fastest growth rate per person since 1990, behind only China. If it can maintain a 7% pace over the next decade, it will follow the same trajectory as erstwhile Asian tigers such as South Korea and Taiwan. Quite an achievement for a country that in the 1980s was emerging from decades of war and was as poor as Ethiopia.

 

Tags: Vietnam, globalization, development, economic, SouthEastAsia.


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Top 10 Greatest Inventions - Listverse

Top 10 Greatest Inventions - Listverse | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
This is one of those subjective lists that many people will agree with and many will not. I have chosen what I think are the greatest modern inventions and listed them from least to most important. Feel free to use the comments to add to the list or to debate my choices.

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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."


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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:34 AM
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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2:47 AM
Using 'Geography Education'
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, December 3, 9:33 PM
Just getting familiar with ArcGis and lots of ideas picked up at #ncss16
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North Korea Accidently Leaks How Tiny Its Internet Is

North Korea Accidently Leaks How Tiny Its Internet Is | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Yesterday, a GitHub file dump revealed all the registered domains listed to the “.kp” country code top-level domain for North Korea. Essentially, it revealed that the hermit kingdom only has 28 websites.


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Pobiti Kamani: The Stone Forest, Bulgaria

Pobiti Kamani: The Stone Forest, Bulgaria | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
About 18 km to the west of Varna, Bulgaria, on the road to the capital of Sofia is a remarkable natural area called Pobiti Kamani or the Stone Forest. At first glance, it looks like the ruins of an ancient temple, but these broken stone pillars are all natural.


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Why the Adam’s Apple is Called the Adam’s Apple

→Subscribe for new videos every day! http://bit.ly/todayifoundoutsubscribe →Why Do Superheroes Wear Their Underwear on the Outside?: http://bit.ly/1Ow7J0

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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 11:01 PM

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you."  I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

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Campfires, explained

Campfires, explained | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Before the invention of clothing, agriculture, and even the wheel, our ancestors were playing with fire.


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This Ingenious Car From 1923 Turned Into a Boat

This Ingenious Car From 1923 Turned Into a Boat | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
It seems like every futurist and her sister wanted to turn cars into boats back in the 20th century. Remember the Water-Mobile of 1947? Or how about the poor man’s yacht of 1958? Well, this Jazz Age invention had them all beat.


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The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2:37 PM

The spice trade changed how we eat forever but it did so much more.  The fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Empire cut off Europe from the vital trade routes to the east and access to the most prized commodities of the day.  What drove European exploration to get around Africa and to cross the Atlantic?  It was to reshape their situation location relative to the economic networks that shaped the emerging global economy.  In essence, the spice trade reshaped the fortunes and trajectories of several major world regions.   

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, food productiondiffusionglobalization, agriculture, economicindustry, economic, historical, regions.

Liz Caughlin's curator insight, November 21, 7:45 PM
Spice trade and connections with diffusion of Islam
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Reclaiming our names: The Tribal Nations Maps project

Reclaiming our names: The Tribal Nations Maps project | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
An exclusive Xica Nation interview with Aaron Carapella (creator of the Tribal Nations Maps) about the project and his experience with the broader Xicanx Mexicanx community.

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Riot police move in on North Dakota pipeline protesters - BBC News

Riot police move in on North Dakota pipeline protesters - BBC News | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Riot police arrest 141 protesters blocking the path of the Dakota Access pipeline.

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10 Extinct Animals With Surprising Attributes - Listverse

10 Extinct Animals With Surprising Attributes - Listverse | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
It’s not easy studying animals when they’re long dead. Nevertheless, paleontologists have managed to deduce quite a bit over the years. Then new research challenges established thought or uncovers species so weird that scientists don’t know what to make of them.

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How to lose your marriage in 5 steps, as shown on HBO’s ‘Divorce’

How to lose your marriage in 5 steps, as shown on HBO’s ‘Divorce’ | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Sarah Jessica Parker's character treats her husband horribly — and then acts surprised when he wants out.

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Colombia rejects FARC deal: What's next?

Colombia rejects FARC deal: What's next? | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"A narrow win for Colombia's opponents to a government peace deal with FARC rebels has thrown the country into disarray, leading one journalist to starkly declare, 'Nobody really knows what will happen tomorrow.'  Likened to the fallout from the United Kingdom's 'Brexit' referendum, the vote's unexpected failure has left the Colombian political classes reeling and unsure how to respond in order to save four years of hard negotiation with the Marxist militia."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 4, 4:31 PM

The Colombian peace negotiations with FARC (the insurgent rebels in drug producing regions) were hailed as the key for Colombia to move past it's violent, drug-cartel past and move into the future.  As the Colombian population rejected the deal by the slimmest of margins (50.22% against), it leaves the government "without a Plan B." There are more questions than answers at this point about what might happen (if you are asking what's FARC?, then this primer will walk you through it). 

 

TagsSouth America, Colombiapoliticalnarcotics, conflict.

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India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows

India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
A $46bn economic corridor through disputed territories in Kashmir is causing most concern

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 6, 1:13 PM

The Indian government doesn't want to seem threatened by the fact that China is paying for better transportation infrastructure that is essentially in their backyard.  India's neighbors are excited for the potential economic growth that this can bring, but weary of China's added clout and power throughout Asia.  As Parag Khanna argues is his new book Connectography, infrastructure and economic linkages will become increasingly more important to geopolitics and global economics; within that lens, China is certainly making a power move here. 

 

Tags: regions, transportationeconomic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 24, 7:47 AM
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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.


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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
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Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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A Geological Tour From 30,000 Feet Up 

A Geological Tour From 30,000 Feet Up  | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Flyover Country, a new app, will help you spot geological features during your next long-haul flight.
Via Lorraine Chaffer, Jukka Melaranta
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 8:44 AM

Geoworld 7 NSW

Chapter 2 Restless Earth: Geomorphic processes

2.9 Water and wind erosion

2.10 Transportation and deposition

Chapter 3: Landscapes: processes and values

3.10 Desert landscapes and landforms

3.11 Deserts: weathering processes

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If You Think You’re Too Broke to Start a Business, Think Again

If You Think You’re Too Broke to Start a Business, Think Again | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it
Get someone to pay you for something, and you have a business. Repeat that process and make it scalable with sales and marketing and you have a successful business.

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Alex's curator insight, July 28, 8:23 PM
Starting a business is not as much about investment as about skills and ideas.
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These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | HOMEHISTORY | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


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