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Charlemagne Biography - life, childhood, parents, death, school, son, information, born, time, achievements

Charlemagne Biography - life, childhood, parents, death, school, son, information, born, time, achievements | History | Scoop.it

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Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan | History | Scoop.it

Of all the images the name Genghis Khan brings to mind, that of a visionary who brought literacy, law and culture to his people rarely springs to mind. His name is usually synonymous with evil, his image that of a brutal barbarian who slaughtered millions in his quest for power. Yet a BBC drama-documentary is aiming to change the reputation of one of the world’s most notorious warlords to that of a heroic figure who achieved greatness against all odds.
Genghis Khan is right up there with the likes of Hitler and Attila the Hun as one of the bogeymen of history, said Ed Bazalgette, the programme’s producer.
We hear the phrase somewhere to the Right of Genghis Khan. Everyone has heard the name yet few people know much about his story. It is one of the great untold stories of history and we wanted to get behind the myths. No one is suggesting that he was a benign individual but his history was written by those he defeated. To make a parallel, imagine if our country’s history was written by the people of Africa or India.
He was intent on sharing his riches with his people, and wanted to raise levels of culture, law and literacy. He also brought Chinese medicine to his people. Amassing material wealth did not matter much to him, as he shared everything with his loyal supporters. He was seen as a generous leader.
Genghis Khan also demonstrated a rather liberal and tolerant attitude to the beliefs of others, and never persecuted people on religious grounds. Born in Mongolia sometime after 1160, he created the largest known empire, covering a fifth of the world, stretching from the Pacific to the Black Sea.


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BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Romulus and Remus

BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Romulus and Remus | History | Scoop.it
Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Romulus and Remus, the foundation myth of Rome.

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Rome

Rome | History | Scoop.it
According to legend, Ancient Rome was founded by the two brothers, and demi-gods, Romulus and Remus, on 21 April 753.

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David Walp's curator insight, April 2, 2013 5:32 PM

Ancient History Encyclopedia - Rome

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History of Constantinople

Byzantium had first been reconstructed in the time of Septimius Severus not just as a Roman city, but modelled on Rome itself, on and around seven hills. Later Constantine the Great chose it as his new capital, renaming it Constantinople, and it remained the capital of the eastern part of the Roman empire


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Roman Colosseum

Roman Colosseum | History | Scoop.it
Visit this Roman Colosseum site for interesting history, facts and information about Ancient Rome. The people of the Roman Colosseum - Emperors, Gladiators, Romans, Slaves and Christian Martyrs.

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Greek Mythology: Ancient Gods & Goddesses (Part 1)

The world of the Ancient Greeks lives on today through it's mythology. For countless generations prior to biblical times, tales of gods and goddesses were pa...

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Alexander the Great (king of Macedonia) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia

Alexander the Great (king of Macedonia) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia | History | Scoop.it
King of Macedonia (336–323 bce). He overthrew the Persian empire, carried Macedonian arms to India, and laid the foundations for the Hellenistic world of territorial kingdoms. Already in his lifetime the...

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joseph mora's curator insight, September 27, 2013 3:57 PM

information and insight of alexander the great which overthrew many empires and had a great amount of territory.

joseph mora's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:27 PM

insight on Alexander the great and him being a king

 

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Reconstructing Pompeian Households

Reconstructing Pompeian Households | History | Scoop.it
Reconstructing Pompeian Households Mimno, David (Department of Computer Science, Princeton University) Conference Paper given at Barcelona, Spain (2011) Abstract A database of objects discovered in houses in the Roman city of Pompeii provides a...

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Ancient Egypt - Gods, Pyramids, Religions, Sphinx and more ...

Ancient Egypt - Gods, Pyramids, Religions, Sphinx and more ... | History | Scoop.it
Tomb of Siptah Siptah is one of the lesser-known pharaohs of Egypt who ruled briefly at the end of the 19th Dynasty. When first opened in 1908, his tomb, which lies to the south of the main valley, was found to contain a pink ...

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Ancient Mesopotamia

Ancient Mesopotamia | History | Scoop.it
The beginning of religion and the development of gods and goddesses in ancient Mesopotamian...

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History of England - Wikipedia

The territory that now constitutes England, a country within the United Kingdom, was inhabited by ancient humans 800,000 years ago as the discovery of flint tools at Happisburgh in Norfolk has revealed.[1] The earliest evidence for early modern humans in North West Europe is a jawbone discovered in Devon at Kents Cavern in 1927, which was re-dated in 2011 to between 41,000 and 44,000 years old.[2] Continuous human habitation dates to around 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last glacial period. The region has numerous remains from the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze Age, such as Stonehenge and Avebury. In the Iron Age, England, like all of Britain south of the Firth of Forth, was inhabited by the Celtic people known as the Britons, but also by some Belgae tribes (e.g. the Atrebates, the Catuvellauni, the Trinovantes, etc.) in the south east. In AD 43 the Roman conquest of Britain began; the Romans maintained control of their province of Britannia through to the 5th century.

The end of Roman rule in Britain enabled the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain, which is often regarded as the origin of England and the English people. The Anglo-Saxons, a collection of various Germanic peoples, established several kingdoms that became the primary powers in what is now England and parts of southern Scotland.[3] They introduced the Old English language, which displaced the previous British language. The Anglo-Saxons warred with British successor states in Wales, Cornwall, and the Hen Ogledd (Old North; the Brythonic-speaking parts of northern England and southern Scotland), as well as with each other. Raids by the Vikings were frequent after about AD 800, and the Norsemen took control of large parts of what is now England. During this period several rulers attempted to unite the various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, an effort that led to the emergence of the Kingdom of England by the 10th century.

In 1066, the Normans invaded and conquered England. The Norman Dynasty established by William the Conquerer ruled England for over half a century before the period of succession crisis known as The Anarchy. Following the Anarchy, England came to be ruled by the House of Plantagenet, a dynasty which also had claims to the Kingdom of France; a succession crisis in France led to the Hundred Years Wars, a series of conflicts involving the peoples and leaders of both nations. Following the Hundred Years Wars, England became embroiled in its own succession wars; the War of the Roses pitted two branches of the House of Plantagenet against one another, the House of York and the House of Lancaster. Henry Tudor, ended the War of the Roses and established the Tudor dynasty.

The history of England concerns the study of the human past in one of Europe's oldest and most influential national territories. What is now England, a country within the United Kingdom, was inhabited by Neanderthals 230,000 years ago. Continuous human habitation dates to around 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last glacial period. The region has numerous remains from the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze Age, such as Stonehenge and Avebury. In the Iron Age, England, like all of Britain south of the Firth of Forth, was inhabited by the Celtic people known as the Britons, but also by some Belgae tribes (e.g. the Atrebates, the Catuvellauni, the Trinovantes, etc.) in what was called Lloegyr by the Welsh. In AD 43 the Roman conquest of Britain began; the Romans maintained control of their province of Britannia through to the 5th century.


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HISTORY OF CHARLEMAGNE

HISTORY OF CHARLEMAGNE | History | Scoop.it
HISTORY OF CHARLEMAGNE including Charles the Great, King of the Lombards, Conversion of the Saxons, A brief crusade into Spain, Holy Roman Emperor, Aachen or Aix-la-Chapelle, A centre of Christian learning, The Carolingian inheritance, The legendary...

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Climate and Conquest: How Did Genghis Khan Rise?

Climate and Conquest: How Did Genghis Khan Rise? | History | Scoop.it
Eight hundred years ago, relatively small armies of mounted warriors suddenly exploded outward from the cold, arid high-elevation grasslands of Mongolia, and conquered the largest contiguous empire in history.

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Romulus and Remus History

Romulus and Remus History | History | Scoop.it
Romulus and Remus History:-
Romulus is given the credit for founding Ancient Rome – so legend has it.

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Constantine the Great - The Roman Emperor Constantine I

Constantine the Great - The Roman Emperor Constantine I | History | Scoop.it
Constantine the Great of Constantine I was the first Christian emperor of the the Roman Empire.

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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:19 PM

As one of the more well known leaders of Europe, Constantine was known for uniting the fragmented Roman empire and uniting it (on his death bed) under the banner of a relatively new religion: Christianity.

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Rome.info > Roman Colosseum, Coliseum of Rome

Rome.info > Roman Colosseum, Coliseum of Rome | History | Scoop.it
Facts on Roman colosseum, info on Coliseum in Rome, Gladiator combats held in Roman colosseum, information on Colosseo di Roma, including Arch of Constantine.

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claudia patino's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:42 PM

In the ancient times the roman Colosseum was a place of entertainment for all. Gladiators would fight wild animals like tigers just to entertain others. This article mentioned the gladiators were people who had committed crimes. Such a terrible punishment to die fighting a wild animal.

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Poseidon

Poseidon | History | Scoop.it
God of the sea and rivers, creator of storms and floods and the bringer of earthquakes and destruction, Poseidon was perhaps the most disruptive of all the ancient Greek gods, not only for mortals(...) (Son of Kronos and Rhea, and brother of #Zeus...

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Imperial mysteries - The Friday Times

Imperial mysteries - The Friday Times | History | Scoop.it
Imperial mysteries The Friday Times Partha Bose, head of an international consulting firm, in his refreshing book Alexander the Great's Art of Strategy, presents a beguiling picture of the 29 year old world conqueror wandering around Takshashila...

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5. Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Houses and Villas at Pompeii

Roman Architecture (HSAR 252) Professor Kleiner discusses domestic architecture at Pompeii from its beginnings in the fourth and third centuries B.C. to the ...

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Pompeii. House of the Faun

At 3000 square metres this is Pompeii's largest house. The House of the Faun fills a whole block (insula) and was built between 180 and 170 BC. It has two at...

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Josh Walker's curator insight, March 2, 2015 3:01 PM

Visual walk around the House of Faun

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Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture

Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture | History | Scoop.it

The European Neolithization ~6000−4000 BC represents a pivotal change in human history when farming spread and the mobile style of life of the hunter-foragers was superseded by the agrarian culture.

Permanent settlement structures and agricultural production systems required fundamental innovations in technology, subsistence, and resource utilization. Motivation, course, and timing of this transformation, however, remain debatable.

 

Here we present annually resolved and absolutely dated dendroarchaeological information from four wooden water wells of the early Neolithic period that were excavated in Eastern Germany. A total of 151 oak timbers preserved in a waterlogged environment were dated between 5469 and 5098 BC and reveal unexpectedly refined carpentry skills.

 

The recently discovered water wells enable for the first time a detailed insight into the earliest wood architecture and display the technological capabilities of humans ~7000 years ago. The timbered well constructions made of old oak trees feature an unopened tree-ring archive from which annually resolved and absolutely dated environmental data can be culled.

 

Our results question the principle of continuous evolutionary development in prehistoric technology, and contradict the common belief that metal was necessary for complex timber constructions. Early Neolithic craftsmanship now suggests that the first farmers were also the first carpenters.

 

Citation: Tegel W, Elburg R, Hakelberg D, Stäuble H, Büntgen U (2012) Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51374. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051374


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David Connolly's curator insight, January 4, 2013 4:16 AM

Important article from PLOSone regarding the ability of Neolithic societies could have sophisticated carpentry without metal tools

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:02 AM

This scoop is about how some wooden water wells that were excavated in Eastern Germany give insight on to what the earliest wood was used for the wells.