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What are song lines? - YouTube

Colin Jones, lecturer in Aboriginal History, talks about his culture, his history and his art.

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Nicoletta's curator insight, April 7, 2014 3:58 AM

This YouTube clip explores cardinal direction, songlines and the navigational tools of Indigenous Australians. This is a short and simple explanation that defines songlines as oral maps.

 

The HSIE K-6 Syllabus emphasises the importance of incorporating the Aboriginal Perspective within the classroom. This is a great opportunity for teachers to do that. One of the outcomes in stage 2 of the HSIE syllabus is ENS2.5 that requires students to explore certain geographical terminology, including cardinal directions. This clip highlights the importance of cardinal directions to many Indigenous Australian groups and how cardinal direction and other navigational tools informed many traditions and ways of life, for example facilitating trade between Aboriginal communities across Australia.


The concept of songlines as oral maps of the land is a concept that would be engaging and exciting for stage 2 students. It also consolidates teaching about cardinal directions.


The following is an activity that can be adapted from the information explored in this paper to support the outcome ENS2.5 in particular subject matter relating to cardinal directions and geographical terminology.

 

Background:

 

1. Teachers should read ‘Songlines and Navigation in Wardaman and other Aboriginal Cultures’ by Norris and Harney.  This is a very insightful read for teachers in relation to Aboriginal culture, traditions, navigation, trade and much more. Much of the content of this paper is related to a range of K-6 HSIE topics and teachers can adapt aspects of the content in an age appropriate manner for their students.

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/people/Ray.Norris/papers/n315.pdf

 

 

2. Teachers can invite an Aboriginal Elder from the local community into the classroom to discuss with students the importance of Songlines to Indigenous Australians and to share some examples of simple Songlines with the students.

 

Mapping and Treasure Hunt:

 

In small groups students are asked to hide some treasure in the classroom. The students must then create two different treasure maps that can be used to locate the hidden treasure. One map will be a visual map (either computer generated or drawn by hand) and the other is an oral map or songline. Students are to try to navigate their fellow group members to find the hidden treasure (in the classroom) using firstly the visual map and then the songline. Students are to use the four cardinal directions to inform their maps. For example, head east ten steps then turn to the north and walk two steps.

 

Tip: Teachers can put markers on the classroom walls to indicate the four cardinal directions.

 

Reference List:

 

Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies.

 

 

 

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Little Red Yellow Black Site

Little Red Yellow Black Site | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

The Little Red Yellow Black website provides further information about each theme, as well as free downloads of print and audiovisual materials and other links and resources.An introduction to Indigenous Australia was developed by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS). The information within this invaluable guide to Indigenous history and contemporary culture has been reviewed by a range of leading research and teaching academics.


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Waabiny Time

Waabiny Time | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Waabiny Time is the first indigenous language program made for an early childhood audience.To educate while entertaining, to preserve our language while telling our stories and to showcase the rich diversity of our culture and creative talent.


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Mandy explains the six seasons

Mandy explains the six seasons of the Top End of Australia. Whilst most people seperate tropical Australia seasons to the Wet and the Dry Season, the Bininj ...

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Digitised Indigenous Knowledge in Cultural Heritage Organisations in Australia & New Zealand: An Examination of Policy and Protocols

Digitised Indigenous Knowledge in Cultural Heritage Organisations in Australia & New Zealand: An Examination of Policy and Protocols | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Ethnos Project - a research blog & information resource: culture & development | digital humanities | Indigenous knowledge | This research project investigates the digital collections from selected heritage organisations, exploring how and if the rights of Indigenous peoples are being protected by policy and protocol documents on the Web.


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ACTF - Language of Belonging - Wadu Matyidi

ACTF - Language of Belonging - Wadu Matyidi | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

The Australian Children's Television Foundation has produced a multi-platform education resource based on the animation Wadu Matyidi. This resource, designed for primary-aged students, provides the opportunity for students to explore Adnyamathanha language, culture, stories and traditions.


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Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:47 AM

The Australian Children’s Television Foundation have created this short animation called the Language of Belonging: Wadu Matyidi. Designed specifically for Primary-aged students, this video is accompanied by a diverse learning program, which gives students the opportunity to explore the Adnyamathanha language, culture, stories and traditions, and develop their own portfolio. Wadu Matyidi tells the story of three adventurous kids who set out for a day of exploration, playing games and spooking one another with tales of ancient creatures, until they see unusual tracks that get their hearts and imaginations racing. The story is both culturally rich and relatable to children. It can help to meet the AusVELS cross-curricular priorities, which requires students to study indigenous culture and history. It is a very sweet clip, and primary aged students will find it engaging.

 


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Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples - australia.gov.au

Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples - australia.gov.au | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Indigenous Viewer Advice Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that the following program may contain images and voices of people who have passed away. Downloads and a complete Apology Transcript

Video: Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, MP - Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples (WMV)
7.7MB - 4min, 3secVideo: Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, MP - Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples (MOV)
16MB - 4min, 3secAudio: Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, MP - Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples (MP3)
1.2MB - 3min, 40sec - 48kbps Mono


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 17, 2013 4:14 AM

" ...we honour the Indigenous peoples of this land, the oldest continuing cultures in human history. We reflect on their past mistreatment. We reflect in particular on the mistreatment of those who were Stolen Generations - this blemished chapter in our nation's history...We apologise for the laws and policies of successive Parliaments and governments that have inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians...K Rudd

Agnes Kharshiing's curator insight, October 19, 2013 1:19 AM
A very Humble Gesture which few would do...Thank You...and thanks for sharing...
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Reconciliation Australia National Reconciliation Week

Reconciliation Australia National Reconciliation Week | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

National Reconciliation Week is held annually from 27 May to 3 June. It is a time to celebrate and build on the respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.Preceded by National Sorry Day on 26 May, National Reconciliation Week is framed by two key events in Australia’s history, which provide strong symbols for reconciliation:


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:40 AM

Why?...acknowledging the past, reconciling the present and developing partnerships for the future. 

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Indigenous Weather Knowledge

Indigenous Weather Knowledge | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Indigenous Australians have long held their own seasonal calendars based on the local sequence of natural events. To the right is a map of Australia with hyperlinks to the corresponding seasonal calendars for given regions.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, July 25, 2013 6:12 AM

A fabulous resource for classrooms around Australia...

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:54 AM

This website shows the Indigenous Australians seasonal calendars, which are based on the local sequence of natural events. It shows calendars from different regions around Australia. I found this very interesting because I never knew that the Indigenous Australians had their own calendars, but now I think about it, it makes sense. This resource could be used during a unit of Aboriginal or Australian history, or as extra knowledge when studying seasons, weather or calendars. It can work in the AusVELS cross-curricular priority, which requires teachers to incorporate study of Indigenous Australians culture, history and traditions into the curriculum. 

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Jandamarra-Mark Greenwood. Teachers Notes

Jandamarra-Mark Greenwood. Teachers Notes | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

‘Burrudi yatharra thirrili ngarra’

We are still here and strong. Jandamarra was an Indigenous hero...whose white ‘bosses’ called him Pigeon. He knew in his heart that the country was inscribed by powerful spirits in the contours of its landscape.The Wandjinas created the land and sky. They also created the spirits that swim in the water soaks and sacred places. Pigeon couldn't see them, but these spirits visited his dreams. Jandamarra's story is an epic and tragic tale which Mark Greenwood has re-told in a simple and yet majestic style, accompanied by Terry Denton’s vibrantly graphic, illustrative interpretation. This is a creative re-imagining of the life of an extraordinary man and of a seminal time in Australia’s history.The reverberations of the events known as the ‘frontier wars’ are still being felt more than one hundred years later and will continue to have an impact on our national psyche.

Jandamarra and his people are still here, and they are still strong.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:12 AM

This book might be studied in lower and upper primary, and also lower secondary classrooms. It is relevant in Australian Curriculum: English; History and The Arts. Also fabulous links to the Cross Curriculum Priority: Aboriginal histories and culture. Jandamarra could also be used to explore such themes as...National Heroes, Indigenous History and Culture,Frontier Wars, Magic and Spiritual Power, Kinship and Community and Values such as: Bravery and Justice

 

Maree Whiteley's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:14 AM

This book might be studied in lower and upper primary, and also lower secondary classrooms. It is relevant in Australian Curriculum: English; History and The Arts. Also fabulous links to the Cross Curriculum Priority: Aboriginal histories and culture. Jandamarra could also be used to explore such themes as...National Heroes,Indigenous History and Culture,Frontier Wars, Magic and Spiritual Power, Kinship and Community

and Values such as: Bravery and Justice

Taryn Coxall's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:10 PM

This is a book i have found that many teachers are using in both upper and lower primary in order to teach students Australian History.  The book foccuses on the life of a man in a seminal time in Australian History a foccusing on the Jandamarra people. I belive this would be a fantastic resource to use in the classroom, especially for upper primary students who are starting to do pursuasive writing a book responces. This book will enage students as well as giving them insight into life as a "Jadamarra person, and therefore how we have evolved and changed thorughout history. 

This particular link gives a wide range of teachers notes and questions that can be used in the classroom with this book. Which is clearly a great resource for teachers to have when approaching basing a lesson on this book. 

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Bush medicine - Ardugalikba

Steve Wurramara, from Groote Eylandt, explains a local bush medicine, ardugalikba (bush onion), in Anindilyakwa. Since December 2011, Steve has been filming ...


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Our Languages | Language Lists

Our Languages | Language Lists | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

This Language List section has been designed to give you access to various lists that exist that detail the traditional languages of Australia.

Why are there many lists ?

Well, there is no definitive list, there has existed over 250 plus languages in Australia with maybe up to 800 dialects...


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My country: Difference Differently

My country: Difference Differently | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

For thousands of years different Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups have maintained connections to particular areas of Australia.  They often refer to their traditional lands as 'country'.  In this activity you will explore the importance of country.

Watch the following video where two Aboriginal people, Lex and Baressa, talk about their country and what it means to them.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:08 PM

AC Geography Foundation Year: People live in places

CD - The Countries/Places that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples belong to in the local area and why they are important to them.

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ABC Radio National - Sharing our Stories

ABC Radio National - Sharing our Stories | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Awaye! presents six Aboriginal dreaming stories. These stories are told to children to teach them about their ancestors, the spirit world and their place in that world. These six stories from Northern Australia tell of creatures such as mermaids, devil-devils, whistle ducks and blue-tongue lizards. Each story is both sung in a song cycle and spoken by traditional storytellers and in some stories associated song cycles are shared.

Listen to the stories in the audio versions and see photos of the communities and the children’s illustrations in the on-line features.


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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

David R Horton is the creator of the Indigenous Language Map. This map is based on language data gathered by Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS and Auslig/Sinclair, Knight, Merz, (1996). The map attempts to represent all of the language or tribal or nation groups of Indigenous people of Australia.


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Australian Aboriginal Languages - Virtual Library - Home

Australian Aboriginal Languages - Virtual Library - Home | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

There are more than 200 Australian Indigenous languages. Less than 20 of these languages are strong, and even those are endangered: the others have been destroyed, live in the memories of the elderly, or are being revived by their communities.

This Virtual Library web catalogue has annotated links to 312 resources for 99 languages. About 44% of these resources are produced or published by Indigenous people.


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The Koori History Website - political history pix index - 1965 Freedom Ride

The Koori History Website - political history pix index - 1965 Freedom Ride | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Rare glimpses of life during the Koori struggle for justice 1938 - 1999


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Australian Rock Art

Australian Rock Art | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Australia has one of the most outstanding and diverse rock art records in the world. Rock art consists of paintings, drawings, stencils, engravings, bas-relief and figures made with the wax of native bees. The Google Art Project is an initiative to provide thousands of high quality, high resolution images from museums across the globe in one place, making art’s history, meaning and beauty available in ways never possible before.


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We Don't Need a Map: A Martu experience of the Western Desert

We Don't Need a Map: A Martu experience of the Western Desert | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it
We Don't Need A Map: A Martu experience of the Western Desert

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, January 21, 2013 5:31 AM

Amazing stories of 'country and place'...

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Our Stories...six sisters share their mission experience

Our Stories...six sisters share their mission experience | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 26, 2013 10:06 PM

Stories of the Stolen Generation you will not find in the New Norcia exhibition

Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 26, 2013 10:09 PM

March is Women in History month...stories of six women of the Stolen Generation.

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:12 AM

Stories of the Stolen Generation you will not find in the New Norcia exhibition

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First Footprints : ABC TV

First Footprints : ABC TV | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it
Super Nomads: 50,000 To 30,000 Years AgoSeries 1| Episode 1

Documentary/Factual 56 mins CC The story of how people arrived and thrived on our continent. With startling new archaeological discoveries revealing how the first Australians adapted, migrated, fought and created in dramatically changing environments.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:18 AM

AC History Year 7 Ancient Australia

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:11 AM

"This four part documentary series explores the story of how people arrived and thrived on our continent. With startling new archaeological discoveries revealing how the first Australians adapted, migrated, fought and created in dramatically changing environments." I loved watching this back in August; I found it fascinating and educational. It is deeply saddening to see how at peace with the land the Indigenous Australian lived up until the arrival of outsiders. Now look at Australia, it has been used and abused, as have its native people. Sorry just doesn't seem like enough any more. 

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Treasure trove of Indigenous language documents unearthed at NSW State Library - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Treasure trove of Indigenous language documents unearthed at NSW State Library - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

Indigenous language documents revealing early contact between Aboriginal people and European settlers has been unearthed.


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My country: Difference Differently

My country: Difference Differently | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

For thousands of years different Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups have maintained connections to particular areas of Australia.  They often refer to their traditional lands as 'country'.  In this activity you will explore the importance of country.

Watch the following video where two Aboriginal people, Lex and Baressa, talk about their country and what it means to them.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:08 PM

AC Geography Foundation Year: People live in places

CD - The Countries/Places that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples belong to in the local area and why they are important to them.

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The first astronomers

The first astronomers | Indigenous studies | Scoop.it

As Australia has the oldest continuous culture on Earth, the first  Australians  were very likely to have also been the first astronomers. In  2008 CSIRO  astrophysicist Ray Norris set out with wildlife expert Cilla  Norris to learn,  collect and document the stories of Australian  Aboriginal astronomy from  community elders who were the custodians of  these stories


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, January 12, 2014 9:14 PM

Ray and Cilla Norris’s publication Emu dreaming: An introduction to  Australian Aboriginal Astronomy became the message stick to a new  generation of teachers, who are now  adding the richness of Indigenous  observations to astronomy science  classes