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Obama vs. Education - National Review Online (blog)

Obama vs. Education - National Review Online (blog) | history | Scoop.it
Obama vs. Education National Review Online (blog) It was 50 years ago this June that George Wallace, the Democratic governor of Alabama, made his infamous “stand in the schoolhouse door” to prevent two black students from enrolling at an all-white...
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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association | history | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site tells the story of the first African Americans to train as U.S. Army pilots and ground support during World War II.

Via Anna West
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Butler Chapel AME Zion Church

Butler Chapel AME Zion Church was the focal point for a multi-year grass-roots project that united and empowered African Americans, rural and urban, educated and uneducated, to fight for the right to vote. Butler Chapel AME Zion Church, an imposing brick building located on a hill west of downtown Tuskegee, is a prominent landmark in the historically black neighborhood known as Zion Hill. The building, the second church on this site, was constructed about 1877. Originally built in wood, the church was sided with brick in the 1940s. In a 1957 effort to minimize the number of black voters in Tuskegee, Alabama's municipal elections, the state legislature simply redrew the town's political districts, placing Tuskegee Institute and all but a small fraction of black residents outside city limits. To protest this action, Tuskegee's middle-class black community and Macon County's poor black citizens joined forces in a seven-year "Crusade for Citizenship." On June 25, 1957, 3,000 area black residents showed up at Butler Chapel for the first of many weekly mass meetings. Only 500 attendees could fit into the church's small sanctuary; the rest listened outside. Charles Gomillion, a professor at Tuskegee Institute and the driving force of the black Tuskegee Civic Association, urged the crowd to join a "Trade with Friends" boycott of local white merchants. "We are going to buy goods and services from those who help us, from those who make no effort to hinder us, from those who recognize us as first-class citizens," he promised. The boycott ended in early 1961 when city boundaries were returned to their original position, after the Supreme Court ruled that a legislature could not single out an isolated segment of a racial minority for discriminatory treatment.


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Italy moves to ban growing of genetically modified maize type

Italy moves to ban growing of genetically modified maize type | history | Scoop.it
MILAN, July 12 (Reuters) - Three Italian ministries havesigned a decree banning the cultivation of a type of geneticallymodified maize, citing environmental concerns, the agricultureministry said on

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Lewis and Clark Expedition

Lewis and Clark Expedition | history | Scoop.it
The Lewis and Clark Expedition, headed by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, was the first United States overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back....

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Selma to Montgomery March

The Selma to Montgomery marches, also known as Bloody Sunday and the two marches that followed, were marches and protests held in 1965 that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. All three were attempts to march from Selma to Montgomery where the Alabama capitol is located. The marches grew out of the voting rights movement in Selma, launched by local African-Americans who formed the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL). In 1963, the DCVL and organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began voter-registration work. When white resistance to black voter registration proved intractable, the DCVL requested the assistance of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who brought many prominent civil rights and civic leaders to support voting rights.

 

The first march took place on March 7, 1965 — "Bloody Sunday" — when 600 marchers, protesting the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson and ongoing exclusion from the electoral process, were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas. The second march took place March 9; police forced 2,500 protesters to turn around after crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

The third march started March 16. Protected by 2,000 soldiers of the U.S. Army, 1,900 members of the Alabama National Guard under Federal command, and many FBI agents and Federal Marshals, the marchers averaged 10 miles (16 km) a day along U.S. Route 80, known in Alabama as the "Jefferson Davis Highway". The marchers arrived in Montgomery on March 24 and at the Alabama State Capitol on March 25.

The route is memorialized as the Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail, and is a U.S. National Historic Trail.


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Celebrating African-American history at Wrather Museum - Murray Ledger and Times

Celebrating African-American history at Wrather Museum - Murray Ledger and Times | history | Scoop.it
Celebrating African-American history at Wrather Museum
Murray Ledger and Times
Under his direction, Tuskegee Institute flourished.
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George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama

George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama | history | Scoop.it
The George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum is a historical museum in Dotha

Via Anna West, elizabeth bridges, Marquentes Harvey, History group123
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Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | history | Scoop.it
Monument erected in 1906 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in memory of Confederate soldiers from Macon County. Scene of 1960s civil rights activities.

Via History group123
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Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | history | Scoop.it
Built in 1903 by students of the Tuskegee Normal School, later named Tuskegee Institute and now Tuskegee University. The students made the bricks by hand and built the two room school under the directions of Dr. Booker T. Washington. It was constructed for the descendants of slaves. Located on three acres of land and restored to its originality, today it is a developing historic museum that tells the story of early school life and living in rural Alabama. The school houses the exposition of local African Americans education and achievements from the slave ships to the space ships, highlighting those of Tuskegee Univertity who help develop the NASA project of growing food in space. Tours daily by request.

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NDAA and Patriot Act are UNCONSTITUTIONAL, therefore VOID & POWERLESS

"Mr. Chief Justice MARSHALL, delivering the judgment of the Court in Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 - Supreme Court 1803, had this to say of unconstitutional laws:

"If, then, the courts are to regard the constitution, and the constitution is superior to any ordinary act of the legislature, the constitution, and not such ordinary act, must govern the case to which they both apply"


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Caldwell's Sacajawea Elementary gets grant from Monsanto - Idaho Press-Tribune

Caldwell's Sacajawea Elementary gets grant from Monsanto - Idaho Press-Tribune | history | Scoop.it
Caldwell's Sacajawea Elementary gets grant from Monsanto
Idaho Press-Tribune
Sacajawea donation.

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The Louisiana Purchase

The Louisiana Purchase | history | Scoop.it
The Louisiana Purchase was the largest land acquisition in U.S. history. For $15 million, the U.S. got 828,000 square miles of territory.

Via Sarah Harrison
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Text-Dependent Analysis in Action: Examples From Dr. MLK, Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

• In-depth analysis and discussion of Dr. King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail • Explanation of the cognitive requirements of the Standards •  

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Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | history | Scoop.it
Artifacts of the Creek Indians, plus memorabilia relating to Booker T. Washington, Dr. George Washington Carver, the Tuskegee Airmen, etc.

Via History group123, TaMaya Smart
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UCR to Commemorate History with 9th Annual Tuskegee Airmen Celebration - UC Riverside

UCR to Commemorate History with 9th Annual Tuskegee Airmen Celebration - UC Riverside | history | Scoop.it
UCR to Commemorate History with 9th Annual Tuskegee Airmen Celebration
UC Riverside
This protest and its aftermath put forces in motion that ultimately led to the desegregation of the Armed Forces by President Harry S.
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