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Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | History | Scoop.it

"Syrian refugees are held by the Jordanians for questions regarding their identities at an unofficial crossing point at the border between Syria and Jordan at Sharjarh, Jordan, April 10, 2013. Thousands of Syirans are crossing into Jordan each day across unofficial border points between the two countries, as Syrians flee ongoing fighting in their country. The United Nations estimates that the number of Syrian refugees is currently over one million, most of whom are living in neighboring countries, straining the resources of host countries."- Lynsey Addario


Via Photo report
Cole Larson's insight:

Well Syria shot themselves in the foot on that one. Three things why their "president" (Dictator) is not very good. 1. He is very power hungry and selfish. 2. He uses CHEMICAL weapons on HIS OWN PEOPLE yeah the people are sure going to vote for you on relection day. 3. He is very inmature and is in no shape to run a country or even his own life. Back to the refuges I think that yes there will be a lot of them, but at least they won't be a open target in their own houses anymore. Jordan please take these people in as your own. They have a bad leader who seems like hurting the people who build your coiuntry is okay.

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Photo report's curator insight, September 22, 2013 5:11 AM

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, where she works for National Geographic, the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine,Fortune, and other publications. She was born on November 13, 1973, in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:07 PM

Provides further insight on the migration of many Syrian refugees (UN estimates there are over 1 million) who are constantly on the move for they are being threatened/unable to return home/are in no-man's-land stuck in between Jordan and Syria, etc. 

- UNIT 2

Kyle Rutherford's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:38 PM

The Syrian refugees were influenced by a major push factor: war. Refugees are people who are forced to migrate from their home country and cannot return for fear of persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a social group, or political opinion. They hope to seek asylum in Jordan until war in their home country ceases but Jordan is running out of supplies to support these refugees.

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DARPA’s New Cyber Targeted-Attack Analyzer Program

DARPA’s New Cyber Targeted-Attack Analyzer Program | History | Scoop.it

DARPA’s new Cyber Targeted-Attack Analyzer program looks at how information is connected and moves to uncover and prevent targeted attacks without a human having to direct it.

 

The Department of Defense (DoD) maintains one of the largest computer networks in the world. The network follows DoD personnel across the globe collecting, transferring and processing information in forms as diverse as data warehouses, in-the-field mobile devices and mission computers on board F-18’s. This network is also constantly changing in size and shape as new missions are undertaken and new technology is deployed. In military terms, that means the cyber terrain of the DoD network is constantly shifting.

 

Traditional approaches to protecting networks involve static cyber firewalls around the network perimeter and patching any discovered holes. DARPA researchers seek a new approach, one that relies on knowing the cyber terrain within the network and understanding how information across the enterprise is connected to find actions associated with an attack buried under or within all the normal data.

 

DARPA’s new Cyber Targeted-Attack Analyzer program will attempt to automatically correlate all of a network’s disparate data sources—even those that are as large and complex as those within the DoD — to understand how information is connected as the network grows, shifts and changes. Once all of the data sources are correlated, the program will attempt to integrate them on a network to allow the defenders to understand the connections—like injecting a contrasting smoke into the air to see how it flows. The third phase of the program also seeks to build tools that use this information for cyber defense of the network.

 

“The Cyber Targeted-Attack Analyzer program relies on a new approach to security, seeking to quickly understand the interconnections of the systems within a network without a human having to direct it,” said Richard Guidorizzi, DARPA program manager. “Cyber defenders should then be capable of more quickly discovering attacks hidden in normal activities.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Cole Larson's insight:

This ias very interesting tech with self shifting program that can help all U.S. Military computers and other software. Also taking software to fight other software and to team up with other ally software is kinda crazy, but I guess its working so far. I like how we made DoD to be self changing, but not selfaware. That would b e very wierd and a little dangerouss. Hopefully this doesn't end badly.

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Boy stands up to terrorist in Kenya mall shooting, saves his family

Boy stands up to terrorist in Kenya mall shooting, saves his family | History | Scoop.it
A 4-year-old British boy may have saved himself, his mother and his 6-year-old sister after terrorists stormed the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Elliott Prior reported shouted, "You're a bad man.
Cole Larson's insight:

That is avery heart warming quote right there. I loved how that kid just doesn't care the consequences of those terrorists. He should get something for doin that. Most people would just run and scream away from those terrorists. Very cool very cool.

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Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | History | Scoop.it

"Syrian refugees are held by the Jordanians for questions regarding their identities at an unofficial crossing point at the border between Syria and Jordan at Sharjarh, Jordan, April 10, 2013. Thousands of Syirans are crossing into Jordan each day across unofficial border points between the two countries, as Syrians flee ongoing fighting in their country. The United Nations estimates that the number of Syrian refugees is currently over one million, most of whom are living in neighboring countries, straining the resources of host countries."- Lynsey Addario


Via Photo report
Cole Larson's insight:

Well Syria shot themselves in the foot on that one. Three things why their "president" (Dictator) is not very good. 1. He is very power hungry and selfish. 2. He uses CHEMICAL weapons on HIS OWN PEOPLE yeah the people are sure going to vote for you on relection day. 3. He is very inmature and is in no shape to run a country or even his own life. Back to the refuges I think that yes there will be a lot of them, but at least they won't be a open target in their own houses anymore. Jordan please take these people in as your own. They have a bad leader who seems like hurting the people who build your coiuntry is okay.

more...
Photo report's curator insight, September 22, 2013 5:11 AM

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, where she works for National Geographic, the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine,Fortune, and other publications. She was born on November 13, 1973, in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:07 PM

Provides further insight on the migration of many Syrian refugees (UN estimates there are over 1 million) who are constantly on the move for they are being threatened/unable to return home/are in no-man's-land stuck in between Jordan and Syria, etc. 

- UNIT 2

Kyle Rutherford's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:38 PM

The Syrian refugees were influenced by a major push factor: war. Refugees are people who are forced to migrate from their home country and cannot return for fear of persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a social group, or political opinion. They hope to seek asylum in Jordan until war in their home country ceases but Jordan is running out of supplies to support these refugees.

Rescooped by Cole Larson from The Geographer's World
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Spatial Diffusion: how regions interact

Describes major regions geographers divide the world into and how spatial diffusion relates to regions

Via Harmony Social Studies, Mark Solomon
Cole Larson's insight:

interesting

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