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History, Archaeology and Anthropology
A way to understand our future by understanding our past and interpreting the findings!
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Arts of the Islamic World Collection Highlights | Collections Online | Freer and Sackler Galleries

Arts of the Islamic World Collection Highlights | Collections Online | Freer and Sackler Galleries | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

Artistic crafts!

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An Ancient City Is Discovered Underwater. What They Found Will Change History Forever

An Ancient City Is Discovered Underwater. What They Found Will Change History Forever | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it
The ancient city of Heracleion is discovered and the findings could change the history books. And it was discovered while looking for something else.
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Author brings history alive for young readers - ABQ Journal

Author brings history alive for young readers - ABQ Journal | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it
Author brings history alive for young readers ABQ Journal Author Carolyn Meyer, with more than 50 books, has carved out a niche for depicting historical and mythical characters through the eyes of young adult characters, prompting one fan to...
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Africa's soil diversity mapped for the first time

Africa's soil diversity mapped for the first time | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it

Atlas drawn up by international experts aims to expand understanding of soil and how Africa can manage it sustainably.

 

Zougmoré tells SciDev.Net that most African countries have national soil bureaus that are inadequately resourced, making it difficult to generate new soil information. He is now calling for more support from African governments.

 

Peter Okoth, a Nairobi-based natural resources consultant, says: "Regional users [of the atlas] have the opportunity to know about trends, problem hotspots and patterns of soil distribution". But he cautions that unless users are properly trained, they may find using the atlas challenging.

 

 Pedro Sanchez, project director of the Africa Soil Information Service (Afsis), and a soil expert at the US-based Earth Institute at Columbia University, welcomes the atlas as an "important tool". But he points out that because the atlas is not interactive, users may find it difficult to determine relationships between soil properties and their impacts.

 

"We are also working on another interactive, web-accessible digital soil map that covers all the non-desert areas of Sub-Saharan Africa," says Sanchez, adding that Afsis hopes to complete this project by the end of the year.

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Kathy Bosiak
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The Real Queen of Sheba - History Documentary - YouTube

The Real Queen of Sheba - History Documentary Traveling back through time along the ancient incense trails of the Near and Middle East, Josh Bernstein seeks ...
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Noahs Ark Has Been Found. Why Are They Keeping Us In The Dark?

Noahs Ark Has Been Found. Why Are They Keeping Us In The Dark? | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it
The Ark of Noah has been found. Its real. Ill describe the evidence in some detail and end with the historical and religious implications.
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The 20 biggest questions in science that still remain in 2013

The 20 biggest questions in science that still remain in 2013 | History, Archaeology and Anthropology | Scoop.it

From the nature of the universe (that's if there is only one) to the purpose of dreams, there are lots of things we still don't know – but we might do soon:

 

1 What is the universe made of?

2 How and where did life begin?

3 Are we alone in the universe?

4 What makes us human?

5 What defines consciousness?

6 Why do we dream?

7 Why is there stuff?

8 Are there other universes?

9 Where do we put all the carbon?

10 How do we get more energy from the sun?

11 What's so weird about prime numbers?

12 How do we beat bacteria?

13 Can computers keep getting faster?

14 Will we ever cure cancer?

15 How will robots advance?

16 What's at the bottom of the ocean?

17 What's at the bottom of a black hole?

18 Can we live forever?

19 How do we solve the population problem?

20 What is time?

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Kathy Bosiak
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Adrian Rojas's comment, September 18, 2013 9:32 PM
What is the universe made of?
2 How and where did life begin?
3 Are we alone in the universe?
4 What makes us human?
5 What defines consciousness?
6 Why do we dream?
7 Why is there stuff?
8 Are there other universes?
9 Where do we put all the carbon?
10 How do we get more energy from the sun?
11 What's so weird about prime numbers?
12 How do we beat bacteria?
13 Can computers keep getting faster?
14 Will we ever cure cancer?
15 How will robots advance?
16 What's at the bottom of the ocean?
17 What's at the bottom of a black hole?
18 Can we live forever?
19 How do we solve the population problem?
20 What is time?
All these questions can be so easily answered because you should be able to answer all of these without hesitating. Like number 1 "what is the universe made of" umm hello seriously it's made of planets,stars, and gravity. I can understand number 2 because this question can be answered on what you believe in like Jesus made us, or we originate from monkeys. But number 8 is another one of those dumb questions "are there other universes" of course there is there's hundreds if billions of universes is just a galaxy.

I like this article because its interesting to know the questions other people have. And it gives a lot of explanations of why people don't know these answers to the questions. I also like the way it doesn't change subject at all like the other article I read and this one is non-fiction. But there I something I don't understand the first paragraph on this article says "questions we don't know the answers to but soon will, but I know most of these answers. So does that mean I'm like smarter or better than most people when it comes to science?
Gerome Tadeja's comment, October 5, 2013 11:51 AM
I thought that this article was interesting because I got to see some of the questions other people had.