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History and Social Studies Education
Resources from Rhode Island College History and Social Studies educators for the classroom http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

July 1-3 mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and it seems only appropriate to share these rich, interactive resources to commemorate the event (this particular interactive feature uses an ESRI storymap template).  This fantastic example from the Smithsonian Magazine shows how history teaching and research can be benefited by using GIS with the example of Gettysburg.  Many student today visit the sites of the Battle of Gettysburg and get a greater appreciation of battle by getting a sense of the lay of the land and the  challenged confronting both armies.  National Geographic has additionally put together resources to made out other Civil War battles.  GIS is not a tool that is just for geographers; any analysis that requires spatial analysis can be mapped. 


Tags: historicalwar, landscape, spatial, GIS, ESRI.

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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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Kent State: Past and Present

Kent State: Past and Present | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard gunned down Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Knox Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer during an anti-war protest at Kent State University.

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Maegan Anderson's comment, May 7, 2013 12:37 AM
speechless...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 10, 2013 9:39 AM

Photos like this that juxtapose the original photograph to present day surroundings always grab me.  What an interesting discussion this could be in a history classroom!

Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

Kent State: Past and Present | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.


In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   


Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 8, 2:13 PM

This is probably the best scoop it I've seen to date. I love the way it's created an insight into the past and present. To see history in a modern day past and present atmosphere is fascinating.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance, impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the United States and the world.

 

Tags: Landscape, terrorism, conflict, states, political, place, historical, unit 4 political.


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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
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Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This is one of the more impressive cultural landmarks in the world, and an architectural marvel.  Studying the cultural landscape reveals that multiple 'layers' are superimposed one upon another.  This phenomenon, known as sequent occupance, is most plainly manifested in this site.  The Haga Sophia has been both a Christian and Muslim holy site, depending which political empire has controlled the city of Istanbul.       

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:26 PM

Turkey is a very unique country.  The land is spread among Europe, as well as Asia and the Middle East.  Its people are among many religions such as Christian and Muslim, and they speak various languages which show how diverse the region is.  Turkey acts almost like a bridge between the two continents and within its borders lie attributes that are hard to find anywhere else on earth.  What is strange about this specific site being the Haga Sophia is that it has been both a Christian and Muslim landmark.  In many other areas of the world, each religion holds authority to their respective traditions and structures.  Though the holy site in Istanbul shows how truely diverse the nation is and has been for its people and especially religions.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 26, 9:49 PM

This is an amazing view of this remarkable land mark. The link provided above did not work however I was able to see the 3-d tour @ http://www.360tr.com/34_istanbul/ayasofya/english/. It was amazing to be able to zoom in and view all angles of this sacred space.The detail and intricacy was breathtaking.I also enjoyed that you were  able to view the surrounding location to establish context .

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 12:57 PM

Visiting the Haga Sophia is on my bucket list for sure! I find it fascinating how one beautiful site can radiate so many different historical periods as well as cultural differences. The Haga Sophia has traces of the religions and people that held control over it at one time or another. 

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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

Curated by Seth Dixon
I'm a geography professor at Rhode Island College. I tweet @ProfessorDixon I welcome suggestions & appreciate meaningful collaboration. http://geographyeducation.org