History and Social Studies Education
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History and Social Studies Education
Resources from Rhode Island College History and Social Studies educators for the classroom http://geographyeducation.org
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Veterans Day 2012

Veterans Day 2012 | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Over the past few days, United States veterans who have served in the armed forces were honored during Veterans Day events.


This is a great gallery with 36 fantastic images.

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Election Day was Historic

Election Day was Historic | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

More women than ever have been elected to both the House and Senate. 

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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.


Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.


Tags: GPS, mapping, location.

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Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 4:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

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The History of Western Architecture in 39 Free Video Lectures

The History of Western Architecture in 39 Free Video Lectures | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
If you have plans to visit the Old World any time soon, you should spend a few good minutes -- make that hours -- with The History of Architecture, a free course that recently debuted on iTunes.


I'm a fan on listening to lectures on my iPod and this looks to be a great download. 39 video lectures can make an travel time much more entertaining and educational. 

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The Conflict in Syria

The Conflict in Syria | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Brown University's Choices Program has many excellent resources for social studies teachers including "Teaching with the News."  Many teachers are seeing the importance of Syria, but might lack the regional expertise to put it in context or to the time to link it with the curriculum.  If that is the case (and even if it is not), this is the perfect place to find lesson plans on the ongoing Syrian conflict. 


Tags: political, MiddleEast, conflict, war.

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Political Leanings of Congress over the Years

Political Leanings of Congress over the Years | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
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Why We Vote

Why We Vote | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

I found this image from a friend on Facebook, but I think it's a powerful way to express the importance of voting. 


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‘Liberty Dollar’ Creator Awaits His Fate Behind Bars

‘Liberty Dollar’ Creator Awaits His Fate Behind Bars | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Bernard von NotHaus, a professed monetary architect, will soon be sentenced for minting and distributing a form of private money called the Liberty Dollar.


This fascinating story brings up some important economic and political issues within society.  A common currency was created to facilitate trade and that is the basis of the coinage system that we hae today.  Underneath that is a question that is gnawing at me: who has a legal right to create a form of currency?  Should a private citizen be allowed to create a new form of money and use that money with other citizens (assuming that they are not trying to pass it off as legal U.S. tender or to counterfeit it)?  As this article states, the Constitution gives Congress the right “to coin money” and to “regulate the Value thereof” — but it doesn't explicitly grant an exclusive right to do creating currency.  This sounds to me like the government is flexing it's muscles to shut down the operation because it shatters the illusion that the government wants to perpetuate that they are the sole provider of currency for economic exchange.

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Over the Decades, How States Have Shifted

Over the Decades, How States Have Shifted | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A look at how the states stack up in the current FiveThirtyEight forecast and how they have shifted over past elections.


Each state has it's own electoral history that often ebb and flow.  These patterns create the curious tapestry that is U.S. political landscape. 

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Electoral Precedent

Electoral Precedent | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Never say never.

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For Poor Schoolchildren, a Poverty of Words

For Poor Schoolchildren, a Poverty of Words | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Along the socioeconomic spectrum in New York City’s student population, there is a corresponding vocabulary gap for children beginning in kindergarten.


Education isn't only what happens in the walls of the classroom.  So many times parents assistance is the critial factor in making the formal education 'stick.'  This was the most jarring statistic fro this article: children of professionals hear 32 MILLION more words by age four than the poorest kids.  That is not inconsequential. 

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Eight Lessons for the Presidential Debates

Eight Lessons for the Presidential Debates | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
What are the key dos and don'ts the candidates should remember when campaigning for the White House?


What does history teach us about the importance of presidential debates?  Here are 8 take-home points about the historical import of debates. 

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Top 10 eBooks for Social Studies Teachers

Top 10 eBooks for Social Studies Teachers | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
With hundreds of different topics to study between the major Social Studies disciplines, it can be a complete drag to pick out the best eBooks for your students.
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Crop It

Crop It | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Thank you Teachinghistory.org. This could easily make for some great future lesson plans.


Via Elizabeth Allen
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 24, 2013 9:48 AM

"Croping" Primary sources

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Why little boys wore dresses

Why little boys wore dresses | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
“No, they didn’t!” The group of third-grade students exclaimed. “Yes, they did.


Just to jog our cultural perceptions and remember that cultural norms (including gender norms) are socially constructed and change over time and space. 

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2012 Election with Past Laws

2012 Election with Past Laws | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
These five maps look at how the 2012 election would have played out before everyone could vote.


This series of maps shows that election of 2012 would have looked very different if the voting laws had not changed.  The African-American, female and young (18-21) have all not been able to vote in the U.S. and all three are key constituencies of President Obama.  However, these maps are assuming the same percentages of today held true for back then. The white population is a declining share of the U.S. population. I remember seeing (somewhere) that if the demographics of the U.S. were today what they were in 1996, he would've won the election.  Here is a related article on the changing demographics of the electorate

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A Look at Presidential Posters of Years Past

A Look at Presidential Posters of Years Past | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Gerald Ford as the Fonz?  Besides the political angle, these posters are also an excellent portal into the pop culture of the day. 


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11 Excellent Reasons Not to Vote?

11 Excellent Reasons Not to Vote? | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
What are the reasons we cast ballots, or don’t?


Clearly I'm a "if you can, you should vote" type of person.  However, this video and article are an interesting exploration into the doubts and qualms many young people have about voting.  I believe that this can help student think about civics and citizenship in a more critical way.

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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 


Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

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Rare Historical Photos

Rare Historical Photos | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Some images become an iconic way in which we remember the past; other images get stuffed into an archive and forgotten.  This particular image in the gallery I find fascinating because in our modern society with a strong conservation ethos is at odds with the attitudes of our forebearers.  True, it most certainly can be argued that our society is not conservationists, but at least in regard to the Redwood forest, we are.  We've enshrined them in song as emblematic of America and federally protected as a National Park and cutting them down is seen as a crime against ecology.  Which images to you find interesting?  How come? 

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.


In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   


Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place

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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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10 Election 2012 Teaching Resources That You Should Know About

10 Election 2012 Teaching Resources That You Should Know About | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
If you’re looking for great teaching resources on voting, the candidates and/or the Electoral College, you’ve come to the right place!


The Election presents an incredible teaching opportunity.  How are you going to use this moment in your classroom?

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Haunted History of Halloween

Haunted History of Halloween | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Halloween was originally called Samhain and marked the end of the harvest season for Celtic farmers.


This is a good video to show the historical context of the cultural festival known today as Halloween.

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WORD CLOUD: The Words Of The First Presidential Debate

WORD CLOUD: The Words Of The First Presidential Debate | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Word clouds by www.wordle.net  are some great visual tools to condense large documents into a more manageable (if somewhat imperfect) perspective.  Governor Romney's "word cloud" is the top one and President Obama's is the bottom.  This in a nutshell is what they spoke about the most during the 90 minute debate. 


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If America had compulsory voting, would Democrats win every election?

If America had compulsory voting, would Democrats win every election? | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
CALL it the "no representation without taxation" shtick.Lexington has been in Pennsylvania this week (and Texas too, but that is for another day), looking at the...


The problem with projections and polls before an election is that they don't always factor in the likelihood that the person being polled will actually show up to the polls.  In Obama's first presidential run, a major part of his success was inspiring those would typically might not have voted to exercise their legal rights to vote.  Was that a one-time spike in interest or can that be duplicated?  Historically speaking, more conservatives will vote at a higher rate. 

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