History and Social Studies Education
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Top 10 eBooks for Social Studies Teachers

Top 10 eBooks for Social Studies Teachers | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
With hundreds of different topics to study between the major Social Studies disciplines, it can be a complete drag to pick out the best eBooks for your students.
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History and Social Studies Education
Resources from Rhode Island College History and Social Studies educators for the classroom http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Let Confederate emblem on Mississippi flag go

Let Confederate emblem on Mississippi flag go | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
As a Christian, it is not worth celebrating and wrapping up my identity in an image that has come to resemble hatred.
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This overtly Christian persective on race, identity and heritage in the deep South is a good read on the changing cultural landscapes of inclusion. 

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A Coloring Book for Grown-Ups Who Love City Maps

A Coloring Book for Grown-Ups Who Love City Maps | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"The adult coloring book fad is not allowed to be dead, not until you’ve gotten your hands on Gretchen Peterson’s delightful little project, City Maps. (And actually, the trend seems to show no signs of abating, if the global colored pencil shortage is any indication.)  Peterson (whose career I recently profiled) is a renowned GIS and map design consultant who took a break from writing cartography textbooks to make the book. For your coloring pleasure, she assembles 44 aerial city maps, which are reduced to black outlines at different scales and levels of detail. Familiar urban patterns include Paris’s Arc de Triomphe, Venice’s Grand Canal, New York City’s Central Park, New Delhi’s Lotus Temple, and the Great Pyramids of Cairo."

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Travel the World: 50 States Quiz

Travel the World: 50 States Quiz | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The 50 states quiz test your knowledge of the fifty states of the U.S. Take the 50 states quiz.
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Watch how immigration in America has changed since 1820

Watch how immigration in America has changed since 1820 | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
200 years of America deciding who should be an American.
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Understanding the immigrant experience is critical to understanding U.S. history, and in charting out the changing way that we have redefined what it means to be an American.  

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This homework assignment says a lot about how America treats its history of slavery

This homework assignment says a lot about how America treats its history of slavery | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The student's answers went into an unexpected topic.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is some good food for thought to consider when making assignments for a class as well as how we treat certain subjects such as slavery in the classroom. 

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A Look Back at South Africa Under Apartheid, Twenty-Five Years After Its Repeal

A Look Back at South Africa Under Apartheid, Twenty-Five Years After Its Repeal | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Segregated public facilities, including beaches, were commonplace, but even today, the inequality persists


There are few words more closely associated with 20th-century South African history than apartheid, the Afrikaan word for "apartness" that describes the nation's official system of racial segregation. And though the discriminatory divide between whites of European descent and black Africans stretch back to the era of 19th-century British and Dutch imperialism, the concept of apartheid did not become law until 1953, when the white-dominated parliament passed the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act, which officially segregated public spaces such as taxis, ambulances, hearses, buses, trains, elevators, benches, bathrooms, parks, church halls, town halls, cinemas, theaters, cafes, restaurants, hotels, schools, universities—and later, with an amendment, beaches and the seashore.

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GeoInquiries - US History

GeoInquiries - US History | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
GeoInquiries are designed to be fast and easy-to-use instructional resources that incorporate advanced web mapping technology. Each 15-minute activity in a collection is intended to be presented by the instructor from a single computer/projector classroom arrangement. No installation, fees, or logins are necessary to use these materials and software.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These GeoInquiries from ESRI are excellent resources for history teachers looking for ways to bring online maps to life in their classrooms.  The are designed for mapping novices, so don't worry if you don't have an GIS background. 

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AASL recognizes HSTRY as top resource for 2015

AASL recognizes HSTRY as top resource for 2015 | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
We are very proud and honored for HSTRY to have been recognized as one of the top resources for education in 2015 by the American Association of School Librarians. We are furthermore delighted to have been recognized as a top resource for Curriculum collaboration. This emphasizes the versatility of our tool and how we are used by all kinds of subjects outside of the social studies scope.
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A Proposal to Change the Words We Use When Talking About the Civil War

A Proposal to Change the Words We Use When Talking About the Civil War | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"A new generation of scholarship has changed the way that the public understands American history, particularly slavery, capitalism, and the Civil War. Our language should change as well. The old labels and terms handed down to us from the conservative scholars of the early to mid-20th century no longer reflect the best evidence and arguments. Terms like 'compromise' or 'plantation' served either to reassure worried Americans in a Cold War world, or uphold a white supremacist, sexist interpretation of the past.Legal historian Paul Finkelman has made a compelling case against the label 'compromise' to describe the legislative packages that avoided disunion in the antebellum era."

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What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:12 AM

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:48 AM

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

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Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong.

Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
History is the polemics of the victor, William F. Buckley allegedly said. Not so in the United States, at least not regarding the Civil War. As soon as Confederates laid down their arms, some picked up their pens and began to distort what they had done, and why. Their resulting mythology went national a generation later and persists — which is why a presidential candidate can suggest that slavery was somehow pro-family, and the public believes that the war was mainly fought over states’ rights.

The Confederates won with the pen (and the noose) what they could not win on the battlefield: the cause of white supremacy and the dominant understanding of what the war was all about. We are still digging ourselves out from under the misinformation that they spread, which has manifested in both our history books and our public monuments.
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GranGoddessa's curator insight, July 1, 2015 2:57 PM

Excellent article!!! 

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APUSH Exam Motivational Speech

An APUSH pep talk from some significant historical figures APUSH Review Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-69ThEyf7-Cnd-C-pSOIEgoUjH6IyjFR
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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Get students thinking about patterns and the 'why's' of history with a focus on the geography and movement behind the historical story.  This is the link to some of the digital maps that can help you put history in it's place.  For more lesson plans, click here


Tags: historical, USA, mappingspatial, GIS,  ESRI, edtech.

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Michele Lally's curator insight, May 16, 2015 2:27 PM

I feel so drawn to and inspired by this curricula, I must study and get certified in the social sciences!

 

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"The Bicycle Corps: America's Black Army On Wheels"

"The story of the 25th Infantry's bicycle trip from Missoula, Montana, to St. Louis, Missouri in 1897. The African American infantry took the trip to test a theory that the bicycle would replace the horse in transporting men for the army. The program also examines the life of the African American soldier at the turn of the century, in particular First Sergeant Mingo Sanders." http://www.upworthy.com/the-black-soldiers-who-biked-2000-miles-over-the-mountains-and-out-of-american-history?g=2&c=reccon1

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The spread of US slavery, in one haunting map

The spread of US slavery, in one haunting map | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The terrible, rapid spread of America's most abhorrent practice.
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13 Honest Books About Slavery Young People Should Actually Read

13 Honest Books About Slavery Young People Should Actually Read | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This week, after severe criticism, Scholastic pulled a newly published picture book entitled A Birthday Cake for Mr. Washington. The book, which was written by Ramin Ganeshram and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, focused on George Washington's enslaved cook, Hercules, and his daughter Delia, as the two overcome obstacles to make a cake for Washington's birthday.

Many critics argued that it displayed an overly rosy view of a slave's life, and the book was deluged with one-star on Amazon reviews.

Many children, and, sadly, their parents, still need to learn that slavery wasn't idyllic, a boon to their family lives, or an improvement over remaining in their homelands. In fact, slavery was often brutal and dehumanizing even when owners exhibited basic kindness. Slaves were often sold away from their families and loved ones with no notice, destroying what little domestic life they were allowed to have; and the severing of black Americans from their ancestors and heritage in Africa is an irreversible trauma.

These are tough facts to confront kids with, especially young kids, but it's better to start with small doses of truth rather than sowing the seeds for "smiling slave" mythologies. Here are 13 (mostly) honest books for young readers that will help them confront the unpalatable truth of slavery, and celebrate the ingenuity and strength of those who resisted, escaped and survived.

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Are You on the Wrong Side of History?

Are you on the wrong side or the right side of history? Is there even a "wrong side" or a "right side"? What do those terms mean and why do politicians and pundits use them? Nationally syndicated columnist and best-selling author Jonah Goldberg explains
Seth Dixon's insight:

Just some context for how the phrase is used in the United States and the ideological assumptions about history. 

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John Peterson's comment, December 19, 2015 1:34 PM
There are obviously wrong and right side of history.
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What America’s immigrants looked like when they arrived on Ellis Island

What America’s immigrants looked like when they arrived on Ellis Island | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
America's diversity captured in photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 30, 2015 9:54 AM

Great set of photos taken on Ellis Island, of immigrants in homeland dress.  

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:56 PM

It's fascinating the diverse places which people came from when entering the US through Ellis Island. I think its pretty odd that someone from the Caribbean region would enter the US through NYC. The diversity demonstrated by these pictures is also impressive, considering that four continents are represented.

Kent College History's curator insight, May 5, 9:53 AM
Photographs of migrants to America in the early 20th century.
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Why Christopher Columbus Was the Perfect Icon for a New Nation Looking for a Hero

Why Christopher Columbus Was the Perfect Icon for a New Nation Looking for a Hero | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Columbus became Columbus in the American Revolution—when the United States sought out an origin story that didn’t involve the British
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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:58 PM

It is amazing the lengths to which people will go when faced with the desire and need for a symbol to rally behind. Especially when the search simply ignores so much of the history which happened int the intervening years. One can only wonder what the differences would have been in modern American symbolism if a Native American figure had been chosen.

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Why didn't the original 12 amendments make it into the Bill of Rights?

Why didn't the original 12 amendments make it into the Bill of Rights? | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
It’s a big day in American history as September 25 marks the moment that Congress approved a Bill of Rights with 12 amendments to the Constitution. So how did we wind up with only 10?
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John Hockenberry: Why I'm done with the 9/11 ritual

John Hockenberry: Why I'm done with the 9/11 ritual | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
"I cannot deny people's grief," writes the host of the radio show The Takeaway, who works not that far from Ground Zero. "But I think the 9/11-ization of American life has been a kind of poison for all of us."
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting perspective on how we remember historical events, and how that impacts our cultural and political perspectives. 

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Teen Researches Topic and Schools Professor

Teen Researches Topic and Schools Professor | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Armed with a Google search and a theory, a 14-year-old enters the fray on a longstanding historical debate


To her surprise, she got results. The Washington Post's Moriah Balingkit reports that newspaper archive databases turned up dozens of work ads from the 1800s with the “No Irish Need Apply” caveat spanning a number of professions and U.S. states. According to Fried's findings, which were published last month in the Journal of Social History, the New York Sun newspaper ran 15 “No Irish Need Apply” ads in 1842 alone.
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Texas' New History Textbooks Are a Disaster

Texas' New History Textbooks Are a Disaster | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Everything's bigger in Texas — including the gap between reality and what state officials want their kids to learn in school, apparently.

The Washington Post reported over the weekend that Texas' new social studies textbooks will not mention, A) Jim Crow laws, B) the Ku Klux Klan or C) the primary role slavery played in launching the U.S. Civil War.

Besides relegating generations of Texas kids to "most exasperating dinner guest imaginable" status, this move all but guarantees the ongoing misrepresentation of what the Civil War and, by extension, the Confederate flag were really about.
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Kaye De Petro's curator insight, July 26, 2015 8:02 PM

This is so unbelievable - talk about rewriting history!

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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.
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Armando's curator insight, June 28, 2015 6:59 AM

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:40 PM

Use for Global History warm up.

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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."


Tags: economicrace, racism, historical, neighborhoodpodcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:31 AM

Urbanization- ghettos