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AAG: Changing Planet

AAG: Changing Planet | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The Association of American Geographers (AAG) is now Beta-testing a new website to address some of the issues from the NRC report, “Understanding the Changing Planet, Strategic Directions for the Geographical Sciences.” This site, builds on the idea that geographers can communicate truth in ways that other disciplines don’t offer, or “the geographic advantage.”

 

The four aspects the geographic advantage (as conceptualized by the AAG team) are:

1.  Relationships between people and the environment

2.  Importance of spatial variability

3.  Processes operating an multiple and interlocking geographic scales

4.  The integration of spatial and temporal analysis

 

To ensure that this advantage is harnessed, the AAG prepared 11 modules within these 4 categories of key issue facing the world:

--Environmental Change

--Sustainability

--Rapid Spatial Reorganization

--Technological Change

 

The site is still under construction and will face some alterations. The AAG will provide beta-testers with a CD-ROM (Teachers Guide to Modern Geography) and select one module that you will fully explore. If you would like to be a beta-tester, sign up at: http://tinyurl.com/geoadvbeta

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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 8, 2012 7:39 PM
I liked the "peace index" video which ranks US states in terms of peacefullness through a number of variables, such as the availibility of small arms.
History and Social Studies Education
Resources from Rhode Island College History and Social Studies educators for the classroom http://geographyeducation.org
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Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Considered the finest military leader in history, Alexander III of Macedon, best known as Alexander the Great, was born in Pella, the Macedonian capital, in July 356 BC. His father, Philip II, was king of Macedon, one of many Greek city-states, and a great warrior.


Alexander the Great was the most gifted military commander in history, leading 40,000 soldiers 20,000 miles over the course of 12 years, and Hellenistic culture spread far and wide due to his military campaigns. Trade connected Greece to points as far away as India and China. Medicine, math, science and philosophy flourished, influencing the Romans, who would go on to influence Western European culture and therefore our culture today"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Here are the opening and concluding paragraphs of an article that my wife and I wrote for Maps 101.  If your school district subscribes you have access to a rich library of over 4,000 resources at your disposal.  If not, you are still able to listen to some of these articles on the Geography News Network that have be made into podcasts. 

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A New World Order...

A New World Order... | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"People outside Independence Hall examining a new map of Europe before the end of WW1, in Philadelphia, October 1918" http://pic.twitter.com/pJIYeXJuj6 

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History vs. Vladimir Lenin

"View full lesson on TED-ED": 


Vladimir Lenin overthrew Russian Czar Nicholas II and founded the Soviet Union, forever changing the course of Russian politics. But was he a hero who toppled an oppressive tyranny or a villain who replaced it with another? Alex Gendler puts this controversial figure on trial, exploring both sides of a nearly century-long debate.

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Armando's curator insight, April 11, 4:31 PM

History vs. Vladimir Lenin

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After Pearl Harbor, Vandals Cut Down Four of DC's Japanese Cherry Trees

After Pearl Harbor, Vandals Cut Down Four of DC's Japanese Cherry Trees | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

After Pearl Harbor, vandals chopped down four Japanese Cherry Trees. The vandals were never identified, but the carving on the stump made their intent pretty clear: to retaliate against Japan by attacking four of the cherry trees originally donated by the county in 1912 as a gesture of goodwill.

But for many people, destroying just four of the trees wasn't enough. Afterward, according to the Richmond Afro American, there was "talk of cutting [all] the trees down and replacing them with an American variety." In 1942, the Tuscaloosa News reported that "letters are pouring into the National Capital Parks commission, demanding that the gifts from Nippon be torn up by the roots, chopped down, burned."

Thankfully, cooler heads prevailed. 62 years before "Freedom Fries," parks staff decided that a simple change in nomenclature would suffice. Throughout the rest of the war, instead of calling them Japanese cherry trees, they were officially referred to as "Oriental Cherry Trees"—a label apparently presumed to be less inflammatory, partly because China and other Asian countries served as allies during the war.

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A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy

A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"The pages that follow trace the history of U.S. diplomacy from the first defensive steps of a fledgling nation to the global reach of a superpower. Benjamin Franklin is regarded as America’s first diplomat, and the four men pictured above were its first 'ministers of foreign affairs.'"

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How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps?

How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps? | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Friday's Russian parliamentary vote on annexation will determine the decision on the map of Crimea, says the Geographer of the National Geographic Society.
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Interactive Map Shows Impact of WWII Firebombing of Japan, if It Had Happened on U.S. Soil

Interactive Map Shows Impact of WWII Firebombing of Japan, if It Had Happened on U.S. Soil | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

When we talk about the bombing of Japan during the World War II, we usually focus on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But before the atomic bombs, the United States had already begun a ruinous campaign of bombing Japanese cities with incendiary weapons. More than 40,000 tons of napalm bombs were dropped on Japanese cities before the atomic bombings took place.

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The 50th Anniversary of the (Re-)Birth of the First Amendment

The 50th Anniversary of the (Re-)Birth of the First Amendment | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
On March 9, 1964, a unanimous Supreme Court reversed a libel verdict against The New York Times in a case brought by Alabama officials who complained about a civil rights advertisement in the paper. The First Amendment, thankfully, hasn't been the same since.


Every person who writes online or otherwise about public officials, every hack or poet who criticizes the work of government, every distinguished journalist or pajama-ed blogger who speaks truth to power, ought to bow his or her head today in a silent moment of gratitude for a single United States Supreme Court decision issued 50 years ago today. It means simply that you can make an honest mistake when writing about a public figure and won't likely get sued.  New York Times v. Sullivan, decided unanimously by the Court on March 9, 1964, in a decision written by Justice William Brennan, finally gave national force to the lofty words of the First Amendment, that there should be "no law... abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press." Without that ruling, and the precedent it has generated since (despite the efforts of Justice Antonin Scalia), investigative and opinion journalism as we know it today would not exist.

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Gunfire Erupted Inside U.S. Capitol, 60 Years Ago

Gunfire Erupted Inside U.S. Capitol, 60 Years Ago | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
In March 1954, members of an extremist Puerto Rican nationalist group launched a terrorist attack protesting U.S. control of the island.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geographic and historical context that ties Puerto Rico with the United States?  This article nicely lays out some of the basics. 


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As American as Peanut Butter

As American as Peanut Butter | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

During the Great Depression, peanut butter sandwiches were handed out in food lines. It was a low-cost, beneficially caloric meal—exactly what people needed. “It’s the Depression that makes the PB&J the core of childhood food,” says Andrew F. Smith, food historian. “It is one of those things that will bind children together regardless of nationality and ethnic group.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

When I travel abroad, I see that others view widespread American consumption of peanut butter as perplexing.  It was during the Depression that many regions, ethnic groups and age cohorts were introduced to peanut butter and being a child friendly food only enhanced it's adoption as a food aid item. 


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See the First Photographs Ever Taken of Jerusalem

See the First Photographs Ever Taken of Jerusalem | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Few places in the world are as revered, fought over and thought about as Jerusalem. For millenia, people have made pilgrimages here, often at great expense and great risk. So imagine for a second what it would be like to hear, from a young age, about this holy city, and then to see the first photographs ever taken of it."

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 8, 9:26 AM
proche et moyen orient: une ville enjeu capital depuis longtemps...
Tony Hall's curator insight, February 26, 5:25 PM

I love seeing old photographs. Although these are blurry they are amazing images. 

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Visualizing Emancipation(s): Mapping The End of Slavery in America

Visualizing Emancipation(s): Mapping The End of Slavery in America | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Computer and online technologies are enabling historians to find ways to create new kinds of documents and ask new kinds of questions about history. Every other week, our Assistant Editor, UT History PhD student, Henry Wiencek, will introduce our readers to the most interesting of these new history projects and websites.

How did slavery end in America? It’s a deceptively simple question—but it holds a very complicated answer. “Visualizing Emancipation” is a new digital project from the University of Richmond that maps the messy, regionally dispersed and violent process of ending slavery in America.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 7, 7:18 AM

These overlay maps look at the emancipation of slaves in the southern US during the Civil War.  What a great way to get kids analyzing and questioning with the use of maps!

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What Does 'Sold Down The River' Really Mean? The Answer Isn't Pretty.

What Does 'Sold Down The River' Really Mean? The Answer Isn't Pretty. | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The phrase 'sold down the river' means you've been betrayed. It used to mean something far worse.


"River" was a literal reference to the Mississippi or Ohio rivers. For much of the first half of the nineteenth century, Louisville, Ky., was one of the largest slave trading marketplaces in the country. Slaves would be taken to Louisville to be "sold down the river" and transported to the cotton plantations in states further south.

In his 2010 history of the Mississippi River, journalist Lee Sandlin said that "the threat of being 'sold down the river' was seen as tantamount to a death sentence."

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Because Washington Crossed the Delaware

Because Washington Crossed the Delaware | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"This podcast explains the route that Washington and his troops took while crossing the Delaware River. Listeners will also discover the pivotal importance that this victory played on the Revolutionary War and American history. To read this entire article, please visit Maps101.com and to listen to our entire podcast collection, please visit Stitcher.com"

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Big History Project

Big History Project | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Consider the big questions about our Universe, our planet, life, and humanity. From the Big Bang to modern day to where we are going in the future, Big History covers it all."

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The map that caused a century of trouble

The map that caused a century of trouble | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"A map marked with crude chinagraph-pencil in the second decade of the 20th Century shows the ambition - and folly - of the 100-year old British-French plan that helped create the modern-day Middle East."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical issues that confront the Middle East stem from the secret Sykes-Picot Treaty that divvied up the Ottoman Empire

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Is this the best April Fool's ever?

Is this the best April Fool's ever? | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"On 1 April 1957, the BBC current affairs programme Panorama hoaxed the nation with a report about the annual spaghetti harvest."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Without some knowledge of the world around you, the more susceptible you can be to falling for anything.  Happy April Fools!  

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What medieval Europe did with its teenagers

What medieval Europe did with its teenagers | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Today, there's often a perception that Asian children are given a hard time by their parents. But a few hundred years ago northern Europe took a particularly harsh line, sending children away to live and work in someone else's home. Not surprisingly, the children didn't always like it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just a reminder for students today that they live in a good time and place for educational opportunities and personal liberties.  

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Arlis Groves's curator insight, March 25, 9:05 PM

Young folks today may be surprised to learn that, had they been born a few hundred years ago in Medieval Europe, they might well be working for another family through their teenaged years.

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Five myths about the Cold War

Five myths about the Cold War | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Our friends and enemies were so much clearer then — right?
Seth Dixon's insight:

With U.S.-Russian relations strained, many are using historical comparison to the Cold War.  This article is a nice reference point to see where such an analogy breaks down. 

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If WWI was a bar fight…

If WWI was a bar fight… | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of the pub when Serbia bumps into Austria and spills Austria's pint."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some may see this as a flippant approach to history, which in the strictest sense it certainly is.  I also see this as a fairly down-to-Earth way to help students understand how a minor issue can spiral out of control.  Middle school and high school students can absolutely relate to a fight that never should have started and as a bonus, bringing some humor into the classroom can be refreshing.  But like any good inside joke, you have to understand the context first to make it funny.    

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A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism

A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Published in 1941, this “Trading Game: France—Colonies” aimed to teach French children the basics of colonial management. 


Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,” Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.

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14 Mind-Blowing Facts That Will Completely Change Your Perception Of Time

14 Mind-Blowing Facts That Will Completely Change Your Perception Of Time | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't the most academic source, but these 14 examples are sure-fire ways to get students interested and thinking.  8 of them can from this list on the Huffington Post

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Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement -- Literacy Tests

Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement -- Literacy Tests | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Today, most citizens register to vote without regard to race or color by signing their name and address on something like a postcard. But it was not always so.

Prior to passage of the federal Voting Rights Act in 1965, Southern (and some Western) states maintained elaborate voter registration procedures whose primary purpose was to deny the vote to nonwhites. This process was often referred to as a "literacy test." But in fact, it was much more than just a reading test, it was an entire complex system devoted to denying African-Americans (and in some regions, Latinos and Native Americans) the right to vote.

The registration procedures, and the Registrars who enforced them, were but one part of an interlocking system of racial discrimination and oppression. The various state, county, and local police forces — all white of course — routinely intimidated and harassed Blacks who tried to register.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Could you pass a literacy test?  Why were these voting tests determined to be illegal?  Letting students see an actual test that was given in the 1960s show just how discriminatory they were.  

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Renata Hill's comment, February 17, 11:35 AM
Excellent article! Thank you for posting.
Lou Salza's curator insight, March 5, 5:41 AM

These barriers were erected more recently than we like to think.  Jumping through 'hoops' like the requirement to present a picture ID at the polling place continue to limit access to the fundamental franchise of our democracy if we can still call it that. Our students need to be aware of this recent history and the current challenges to voter rights. --Lou

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The First Black Player in the Major Leagues Lived His Life as a White Man

The First Black Player in the Major Leagues Lived His Life as a White Man | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

On June 22, 1937, Joe Louis knocked out James Braddock with a right to the jaw to become the world heavyweight champion. At a time when Major League Baseball was still a decade from integration, Louis’ victory in Chicago’s Comiskey Park was a triumph for black America, and for racial progress. “What my father did was enable white America to think of him as an American, not as a black,” Joe Louis Jr. told ESPN in 1999. “By winning, he became white America’s first black hero.”

Three months before the fight, another notable moment involving race and sports occurred in the same city: the death of a 76-year-old man named William Edward White, of blood poisoning after a slip on an icy sidewalk and a broken arm. Fifty-eight years earlier, White played a single game for the Providence Grays of baseball’s National League to become, as best as can be determined, the first African-American player in big-league history. Unlike Louis’ knockout, though, White’s death merited no coverage in the local or national press. A clue as to why can be found in cursive handwriting in box No. 4 on White’s death certificate, which is labeled COLOR OR RACE. The box reads: “White.” 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Race is a socially constructed concept more than it is a genetic reality.  In 1860, William White was born to a biracial slave, with the paternity coming from the white slave owner.  According to the times, he was officially considered black but he could racially pass in white society.  So is he a pioneer for African-Americans if he was "racially passing?"  The cultural nuances of those like William White is a fascinating portal into how we think about race and identity. 

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The Egyptian Revolution: An Interactive Timeline

The Egyptian Revolution: An Interactive Timeline | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Objectives for this Teaching with the News:

Students will:

  • Review a timeline of events in Egypt over the past three years.
  • Identify core themes of Egyptian protest movements.
  • Work collaboratively with classmates.
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