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History and Social Studies Education
Resources from Rhode Island College History and Social Studies educators for the classroom http://geographyeducation.org
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The Conflict in Syria

The Conflict in Syria | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

Brown University's Choices Program has many excellent resources for social studies teachers including "Teaching with the News."  Many teachers are seeing the importance of Syria, but might lack the regional expertise to put it in context or to the time to link it with the curriculum.  If that is the case (and even if it is not), this is the perfect place to find lesson plans on the ongoing Syrian conflict. 


Tags: political, MiddleEast, conflict, war.

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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance, impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the United States and the world.

 

Tags: Landscape, terrorism, conflict, states, political, place, historical, unit 4 political.


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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     

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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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14 reasons why this is the worst Congress ever

14 reasons why this is the worst Congress ever | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
14 reasons why this is the worst Congress ever...

 

Action in Washington D.C. has come to a grinding halt, and politics is increasingly partisan.  These statistical meansure show just how ineffective the political process has become in the United States.   

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 28, 2013 2:04 PM

Do you agree? In your opinion, how should we measure whether Congress is effective? What can the people do when they don't think their legislators are effective?

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Agreement Groups in the United States Senate

Agreement Groups in the United States Senate | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

This interactive graph shows the partisan nature of voting blocs within the Senate.  Where are your senators on this graph? 

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What is the Arab Spring?

The Choices Program asks Brown University's Political Scientist Melani Cammett to briefly explain the Arab Spring.  This is a great primer to teach young students who don't follow international news to understand the beginnings of the Arab Spring.  For more videos by the Choices Program in their "Scholars Online" series, see:

http://www.choices.edu/resources/scholarsonline.php

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:40 PM

The Arab Spring can be described as an uprising of Arab protesters that are no longer afraid to stand up against their rulers to improve their own political and economic conditions. Arabs march in the streets and hold signs to get their points across in hopes that things will eventually look up.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:51 PM

The Arab Spring is an event the media has spend great deals of time talking about, both pros and cons. Yet unfortunately they've neglected to give a decent description of what it actually is. This video provided and over view of the beginnings of the Arab Spring and what it has blossomed into today.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 3:17 PM

(Africa)Melani Cammett, the Political Scientist and Brown University was asked to describe the Arab Spring by The Choices Program. She does a good job explaining this. The Arab Spring is a term used to describe the various uprisings coming out of the Middle East and Africa which started in December 2010, and then picked up a lot of speed in 2011. The Arab spring started in Tunisia when a fruit and vegetable farmer lit himself on fire to protest his treatment by the police. Acts like this spread through Tunisia and through Egypt into the Middle East. So the Arab Spring refers to the wave of protest that ranges from morocco to Syria and Oman. People have lost their fear of protest against the government, which is surprising because in these areas it is previously unheard of. It seems like the people are taking notes from peaceful American protests, instead of resorting to violence. 

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Dr. Seuss Went to War

Dr. Seuss Went to War | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

The Library at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) has a catalog of political cartoons from 1941-1943 by Dr. Seuss in their special collections.

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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A case study for our World Development text book...

 

How useful was digital technology, particularly social networking sites, to democracy protesters in Tunisia and Egypt?  How important are the democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa to world development?  Social media has fundamentally changed the cultural and political paradigms. 

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 3, 2014 5:00 AM

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:40 PM

While we sit here on Facebook and Twitter for a way to connect with friends, share photos of our vacations or follow our favorite celebrities every move places in North Africa and some of the Middle East are using social media to change their country.  In countries like Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt people have used these social media sites to disperse information to the general public.  Where a rally will be held, a map of where police forces will be located, and what to do in the event teargas is used are all topics for discussion on social media.  With the use of these websites a larger group of people are able to take part in the overthrow of the government.  With leaders restricting the access to the web even more people were intrigued to join the protests.  When people can't follow along on the internet the events they decided to go take part in the events themselves.  With the use of these social media websites the Arab Spring in these areas was able to be as successful as it was.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 5:27 PM

I think it is important that technology plays a role in these revolutions. Before, if a revolution happened, the dictator could just silence its population. Now the population has things like Facebook and Twitter to mobilize their plans of attack for meeting places and advice about how to confront the government. As such, the power of the citizens has grown and according to the article some argue it was this power that made the government officials in Egypt and Tunisia stand down. I tend to agree since the coverage of the event helped increase the size of the demonstrations.  

 

I love that these protests for democracy are being led by the citizens. Since the citizens actually want this type of government, there is actually a chance that this might  be what the country needs. As you mentioned during the Solar Diem video, what works for one society may not translate to another. The author of this piece is more than likely from a western democracy given how the author thinks "democratic change offers the only solution"  to issues like poverty and internal strife within "Arab" countries. Yet, that isn't the case in the Middle East. By forcing a democratic revolution on Iraq,  the region is more destabilized than it was under the harsh command of Saddam Hussein. As you mentioned in class, Iraq needed a dictator like Hussein to keep peace though. So as helpful as technology might be  for democratic revolutions, democratic revolution might not be the answer to every countries problems.

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Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources

Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

We suggested ways to teach about Election 2012 and included links to lesson plans and Times features, and we'll be updating the page regularly as the march to the White House proceeds.


The Learning Network has partnered with the NY Times to produce lesson plans for all ages (and all disciplines) on how to teach using the 2012 United States Presidential Election. 

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2600 years of history in one object

TED Talks A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script, damaged and broken, the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism.

 

At first glance this TED Talk appears to be more about ancient history, archaeology and biblical studies that anything modern.  Yet as Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum continues his discussion of the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script), it becomes clear that this historical artifact is an important more of how modern states conceive of their heritage, cultural legacy and role within the Middle East today (such as Israel, Iraq, Iran and the U.K.).  As such the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism and plays a role in shaping Middle Eastern cultural and political institutions. 

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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:18 PM
Objects, ideas and land can have multi overlapping meanings that are constantly being reinterpreted by each succeeding generation creating new symbolic understandings that overlap into many societies and cultures.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:16 AM

Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, explains Middle Eastern history using the Cyrus Cylinder.  His first point in this TED talk is especially interesting because he explains that people age and perish and objects do the same, but objects such as this cylinder survive and are able to tell important stories of history for a much longer time than people normally can.

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The 9/11 Dilemma: Freedom vs. Security

KH: How has America changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001? We are still struggling to find a balance between saftey and civil liberties. The Patriot Act, prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, interrorgation techniques have all become parts of our lives.

The article asks the questions...

• Can the government listen to our phone conversations and read our  e-mails without warrants?

• Should suspected terrorists at the Guantánamo prison in Cuba have the right to challenge their detention in court?

• How much power does the president have to search for and punish those accused of having terrorist ties?

• Are harsh interrogation techniques ever justified? And at what point do they become torture?

 

Do you remember a time when you could board a plane with friends or family seeing you off from the gate? Do you remember bringing liquids though security? The youth of this country do not.  For more resources on September 11th, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/national-september-11-memorial-the-world


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50 Years of Government Spending

50 Years of Government Spending | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Of each dollar the federal government spends, how much goes to health care? How much goes to defense? How much goes to other programs? And how has spending changed over time?

 

How have American politics changed over the years?  What influences these changes?  What do you expect this graph to look like in the future? 

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Epic time-lapse map of Europe

"Fast forwarding from ca 1000 AD until 2005 showing Europe's shifting borders, alliances, unions, territories, occupied land etc."

 

This is an excellent video that highlights the shifting political geography of Europe and the historical sweeps of the various eras. 

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Instructions to All Persons of Muslim Ancestry | Articles | Discover Nikkei

Instructions to All Persons of Muslim Ancestry | Articles | Discover Nikkei | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
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The many faces of marriage in America

The many faces of marriage in America | History and Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
A quarter-century ago, 65% of Americans thought interracial marriage was unacceptable for themselves or for other people.

 

How is the institution of marriage changing within the United States?  For politics, civics, government and the law, this might very well be one of the historically defining issues of the era.   

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Samantha Hafften's curator insight, April 10, 2013 12:50 PM

"the tide of history: it tends to flow from intolerance to acceptance." This statement is very true.  America has come to accept interracial marriage, with the majority of the citizens believe that it has been good for society.  I hope that in the future America can accept gay marriage and keep the tide going.

jclark's comment, April 11, 2013 11:48 AM
I agree with that assessment, The Institution of Marriage has been very stale, if we institute Gay marriage, then the couple who are Gay, can be happy, and not be the Second Class marriage