HSIE: Historical Parramatta
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HSIE: Historical Parramatta
HSIE: Stage 1: Places in the local area associated with historical events e.g. Aboriginal sites, a memorial (for Parramatta Public School)
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Discover Parramatta: Heritage & Historic Sites

Discover Parramatta: Heritage & Historic Sites | HSIE: Historical Parramatta | Scoop.it

I really enjoyed my time at Heritage & Historic Sites

Helena Opolts's insight:

This website provides information about Parramatta Park. Parramatta Park is on UNESCO’s World Heritage List and is a historically significant place. It contains evidence of over 20,000 years of Aboriginal occupation and historical sites (e.g. Old Government House, Boer War Memorial).

 

Parramatta Park represents a great location for an excursion for a Stage 1 Class. It is in the local area and students may have visited previously. There is also a playground and places to rest and eat. With the park’s size, not all historical sites can be visited, so it is important to plan carefully to maximise the visit. For example, consider integrating other areas of the HSIE curriculum (e.g. Environments and Cultures).

 

Specific information is provided on the website regarding historical sites located in the park as well as HSIE Primary School Programs developed by DET for Parramatta Park.

 

Pre-excursion, activate student interest in the park by distributing pictures with descriptions. Define and explain unfamiliar words. Ask students what they already know about the sites, describe any personal experiences and what they want to find out about the sites, either through brainstorming or group discussion. These activities align to the first stage of the inquiry process (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 108).

 

During the excursion, record the visit using a video and/or digital camera as an observation record. Provide students with a simple worksheet so that they can document their observations, basing the worksheet on what students identified that they wanted to know. These activities align to the second inquiry stage (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 109).

 

Using the observation records, assessment tasks could include students writing a description of the site they visited, what they did there and what they learnt, drawing a picture of their favourite site, or orally describing what their favourite site was and what they liked about it. After these activities, student can tally the responses and either write a report summarising the results and/or create a simple graph (assisting numeracy). Students can also create posters to display to the rest of the school. This activity aligns to the third inquiry stage (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 116).  

 

References

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Sydney Living Musuems: Elizabeth Farm

Sydney Living Musuems: Elizabeth Farm | HSIE: Historical Parramatta | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Farm – Australia’s oldest surviving homestead

Helena Opolts's insight:

The Sydney Living Museums website (previously the Historic Houses Trust) showcases a number of sites associated with historical events that offer insights into how lives were lived. Of specific interest to the Parramatta area is Elizabeth Farm, the oldest surviving homestead in Australia. Elizabeth Farm is a great excursion location for Stage 1 students, and the nature of the historical site allows teachers to integrate several areas of the HSIE curriculum (e.g. Environments) into the visit.

 

An Education link provides information on school programs, including information for teachers, learning resources and visit planning. The primary programs are split into individual stages. Stage 1 has a specific program for Elizabeth Farm - ‘Now and then’. An excursion introduction is available, which teachers can use as a pre-excursion activity with their class. Other information provided for teachers include risk assessments and introductions available for special needs and integrated classrooms. Learning resources available include pre-and post-visit information and activities which teachers can review and adapt for their classroom.

 

As a teaching idea, teachers can provide pre-excursion information, discussing the significance of the site to the local area (e.g. merino sheep and wool at Elizabeth Farm) and/or a brief history, either orally or as a brief text with pictures. Students can read and/or discuss the information (assisting literacy) identifying what they would like to see on the excursion.

 

Elizabeth Farm is a ‘hand-on’ site where students can touch objects. A sensory audio tour is also available, which teachers can use to explore the gardens with students, using senses such as looking, listening, smelling and touching. This tour would also link to the Environments part of the syllabus. A digital record of the visit should be made for students to reference later.

 

As a post-excursion assessment task, the students could paint/draw a picture and/or participate in a teacher-led discussion on what they have seen. In groups, students could discuss their visit, highlighting what they liked and didn’t like. Students could also discuss the differences between life at Elizabeth Farm and their own lives. The discussion results can then be presented back to the class. In a Stage 1 class, teachers may need to scaffold this process. Group work enables students to develop cooperative behaviour and improve social and interpersonal skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 146).

 

References

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Beihai Park

Beihai Park | HSIE: Historical Parramatta | Scoop.it

Located in Beijing, it is one of the oldest and most authentically preserved imperial gardens in China and is over 1000 years old.

Helena Opolts's insight:

To provide a global perspective on learning about places in the local area, another park with historical sites was selected from outside Australia. Beihai Park was chosen, as China is one of Australia’s most important Asian neighbours. This website provides information about Beihai Park.

 

Beihai Park, one of the oldest and most authentically preserved imperial parks, is located in Beijing and is over 1000 years old. Beihai Park has a large lake and a number of historically important structures such as palaces and temples. For example, the White Pagoda and Five-Dragon Pavilion. Beihai Park was used by several Chinese emperors.

 

A teaching idea could be to explore the similarities and differences between Beihai Park and Parramatta Park (e.g. park age, historical buildings). Using a KWL chart, students can record what they know about Beihai Park (probably very little) and what they want to know. A small text describing Beihai Park, with associated pictures, can then be created as a teaching resource to assist this exploration. Possible new words such as pagoda, pavilion and emperor should be discussed prior to reading the text. From this information, teachers can create a grid comparison worksheet to enable students to discuss and document the similarities and differences, either individually, in groups, or as a teacher-led discussion. The results of these discussions can then be included on the KWL chart. This comparison can also be used as a transition into other parts of the HSIE curriculum (especially Cultures).

 

Students could also be supplied with sentences containing ‘blanks’, which they can fill in from the supplied text (assisting with literacy outcomes). Students can be given maps where they document the locations of China and Australia, Sydney and Beijing.

 

As an assessment task, students could create posters and/or reports on Beihai Park, based on what they have learned. Posters could be displayed in the classroom or throughout the school.

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Parramatta Park

Parramatta Park | HSIE: Historical Parramatta | Scoop.it

"Parramatta Park is one of Australia's most important cultural landscapes and is inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List."

Helena Opolts's insight:

This website provides information about Parramatta Park. Parramatta Park is on UNESCO’s World Heritage List and is a historically significant place. It contains evidence of over 20,000 years of Aboriginal occupation and historical sites (e.g. Old Government House, Boer War Memorial).

 

Parramatta Park represents a great location for an excursion for a Stage 1 Class. It is in the local area and students may have visited previously. There is also a playground and places to rest and eat. With the park’s size, not all historical sites can be visited, so it is important to plan carefully to maximise the visit. For example, consider integrating other areas of the HSIE curriculum (e.g. Environments and Cultures).

 

Specific information is provided on the website regarding historical sites located in the park as well as HSIE Primary School Programs developed by DET for Parramatta Park.

 

Pre-excursion, activate student interest in the park by distributing pictures with descriptions. Define and explain unfamiliar words. Ask students what they already know about the sites, describe any personal experiences and what they want to find out about the sites, either through brainstorming or group discussion. These activities align to the first stage of the inquiry process (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 108).

 

During the excursion, record the visit using a video and/or digital camera as an observation record. Provide students with a simple worksheet so that they can document their observations, basing the worksheet on what students identified that they wanted to know. These activities align to the second inquiry stage (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 109).

 

Using the observation records, assessment tasks could include students writing a description of the site they visited, what they did there and what they learnt, drawing a picture of their favourite site, or orally describing what their favourite site was and what they liked about it. After these activities, student can tally the responses and either write a report summarising the results and/or create a simple graph (assisting numeracy). Students can also create posters to display to the rest of the school. This activity aligns to the third inquiry stage (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 116).  

 

References

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.


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Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation

Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation | HSIE: Historical Parramatta | Scoop.it

This site is a resource for the preservation of the history, as well as the development of the future of the Darug People.

Helena Opolts's insight:

This website preserves the history of the Darug people and is written by members of the Darug. It is targeted at the Darug and others interested in the Darug, their language and traditions. Parts of the website are secure and are only used by Darug members.

 

As Parramatta was the home of the Burramatta people, who were part of the Darug, students can gain an understanding of the history of their local Aboriginal community. A teaching idea could be to explain how Aborigines belong to different clans (i.e. Darug), containing different family groups (i.e. Burramattagal). Maps can be used to show where the Darug and Burramattagal were specifically located in the context of other Aboriginal clans.

 

A pictorial history is documented, containing Parramatta specific pictures (e.g. spearing eels, Parramatta camp site). The pictorial history can also be used as a transition into other parts of the HSIE curriculum (especially Cultures). As a teaching idea, students could also choose their favourite picture and write a sentence(s) on the picture (as a literacy strategy).

A guest lecturer from the Burramattagal could detail Parramatta’s history from an Aboriginal perspective, highlighting local historical Aboriginal sites, thus complementing this website. Students can define what questions they will ask.

 

A Darug language webpage lists local place names and their Darug origin. For example, Parramatta (burramatta (burra = eel; matta = place (water)). As a teaching idea, a poster could be produced displaying a map of the Parramatta area, highlighting specific places and their Aboriginal meaning. A teacher could also link this to the name and logo of the Parramatta Eels rugby league club.

 

A link is provided to the Yarramundi Kids website (children’s show on National Indigenous Television) which provides children’s activities as well as listing words translated from Darug into English (e.g. maya = eye). Teachers could create a game whereby students are encouraged to use these words.

 

As an assessment task, to consolidate all teaching ideas, students could give an oral story on what they have learnt about the Darug and Burramatta people. Story sharing is one of the eight Aboriginal ways of learning (Yunkaporta & Kirby, 2011, p. 207).

 

This website is still in progress (stated on the Home page), so it is important to continually refer back to the website for additions and changes.

 

References

Yunkaporta, T., & Kirby, M. (2011). Yarning up Indigenous pedagogies: A dialogue about eight Aboriginal ways of learning. Two way Teaching and Learning (pp. 205-214). Melbourne ACER.

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