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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, debuts rare painting by Renaissance master Piero Della Frencesca

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, debuts rare painting by Renaissance master Piero Della Frencesca | Historia del Arte | Scoop.it

Piero della Francesca, Senigallia Madonna, 1470s. Oil and tempera on panel. Galleria Nazionale delle Marche / Soprintendenza per i Beni Storici, Artistici ed Etnoantropologici delle Marche. Courtesy of Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali/Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, September 16, 2013 5:03 AM

Best highlights: [...] The exhibition is part of “2013—Year of Italian Culture,” a series of events that celebrates the best of Italian arts and culture in more than 50 cities and 80 participating institutions across the US. Supporting sponsorship from Friends of the Italian Cultural Center of Boston.[...]

 “This profoundly moving painting, by one of the greatest of all Italian artists, will give visitors to the MFA an experience of intense spirituality,” said Malcolm Rogers, Ann and Graham Gund Director at the MFA. “Piero created his serene masterpiece, the Senigallia Madonna, in the 1470s. Five-hundred years later, the painting was so coveted that it was stolen from its home and only recovered thanks to the diligence of the Carabinieri’s Art Squad. We are grateful for the efforts of the Carabinieri and the generosity of the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche to bring this treasure to the United States.” Admired today for creating some of 15th-century Italy’s most treasured frescoes and altarpieces, Piero was a brilliant mathematician as well as a painter. Known as an early master of geometry, his style is marked by the geometric elegance of his settings, the calm and nobility of his monumental figures and a masterly handling of light. The Senigallia Madonna, nearly 2 feet by 2 feet in size, shows the Virgin Mary and the Christ Child with two attending angels. Given its format and subject, this picture would have been intended for private devotion. Its name comes from the port city near Urbino in Italy, where it was first noted in a church in the 19th century. The painting is normally on display in the Italian museum, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche, located in the Ducal Palace (Palazzo Ducale) in Urbino. With only a handful of works by Piero in American museums, the Senigallia Madonna exhibition is a rare opportunity to see what is believed to be the Tuscan artist’s last painting. [...]

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Musée d'Orsay: Collections catalogue - search results

Musée d'Orsay: Collections catalogue - search results | Historia del Arte | Scoop.it

Via Ricardo E. Valenzuela Ruiz
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apreciacion artistica : ARTE PRERROMANICO

apreciacion artistica : ARTE PRERROMANICO | Historia del Arte | Scoop.it
El arte prerrománico se define como la sucesión y conglomerado variopinto de estilos artísticos del occidente europeo desde la caída del imperio romano de occidente y la eclosión del románico como arte unificador europeo ...

Via Ricardo E. Valenzuela Ruiz
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25 Years After Luis Barragán’s Death, A Look At Mexican Modernists

25 Years After Luis Barragán’s Death, A Look At Mexican Modernists | Historia del Arte | Scoop.it

Via fc3arch, Ricardo E. Valenzuela Ruiz
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fc3arch's curator insight, July 15, 2013 2:43 PM

This photo reminds us a bit of the artwork of Giorgio de Chirico. Architect Luis Barragan, Master of Color, Light and Space. Mexico’s most well-known architect and the symbol to its modern movement was born and raised in Guadalajara, one of seven children in a wealthy and very Catholic family. Educated as an engineer, Barragan became interested in architecture through the guidance of his school’s director, architect Augustin Besave. A crucial part of his biography was a long trip of his to France and Spain in 1925 to 1926. Impressed by the Muslim influence on architecture he saw in Spain, Barragan returned to Guadalajara and started planning and remodeling buildings with a Middle Eastern style and emphasis on color and water features.