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WhatWasThere - Put history in its place! - View photos at the same location over the years

WhatWasThere - Put history in its place! - View photos at the same location over the years | Historia! | Scoop.it

WhatWasThere ties historical photos to Google Maps, allowing you to tour familiar streets to see how they appeared in the past.


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Tribes, Oklahoma reach deal on water rights dispute

Tribes, Oklahoma reach deal on water rights dispute | Historia! | Scoop.it
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An agreement that settles longstanding lawsuits involving water rights in the historic treaty territories of the Choctaw and Chickasa
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Big Fat Notebook: Study Guides for Middle School

Big Fat Notebook: Study Guides for Middle School | Historia! | Scoop.it
Go back to school with Big Fat Notebooks! They're are easy-to-read, condensed notes from the smartest kid class in every subject, perfect for our middle school kids.
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The Despair of Poor White Americans

The Despair of Poor White Americans | Historia! | Scoop.it
Poor white Americans’ current crisis shouldn’t have caught the rest of the country as off guard as it has.
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Teach Your Boys How to Enjoy Studying History

Teach Your Boys How to Enjoy Studying History | Historia! | Scoop.it
History is one of those subjects that can be dry and boring - or it can come alive and inspire your kids! Learn these 8 tips for creating engaging lessons!
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Ford's Theatre - Google Cultural Institute

Ford's Theatre - Google Cultural Institute | Historia! | Scoop.it
The Google Cultural Institute brings together millions of artifacts from multiple partners, with the stories that bring them to life, in a virtual museum.
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Stamp Act imposed on American colonies - Mar 22, 1765 - HISTORY.com

Stamp Act imposed on American colonies - Mar 22, 1765 - HISTORY.com | Historia! | Scoop.it
On this day in History, Stamp Act imposed on American colonies on Mar 22, 1765. Learn more about what happened today on History.
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How rocks shaped the Civil War

The most studied battleground from the American Civil War, from a geological perspective, is the rolling terrain surrounding Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Here, the mixture of harder igneous and softer sedimentary rocks produced famous landform features such as Cemetery Hill and Little Round Top that provided strong defensive positions for the Union Army. Another even more common type of rock -- carbonates such as limestone -- provided similarly formidable defensive positions at numerous other battlefields in both the eastern and western theaters of conflict. Limestones and dolostones shaped the terrain of multiple important battle sites, including Antietam, Stones River, Chickamauga, Franklin, Nashville, and Monocacy, and these rock types proved consequential with respect to the tactics employed by both Union and Confederate commanders. This article by Scott P. Hippensteel of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte describes how carbonate rocks produced rolling terrain that limited the range and effectiveness of both artillery and small arms. Additionally, thin soils above limestone bedrock prevented tillage and the resulting forests provided concealment and cover for advancing troops. From a defensive perspective, on a larger geographic scale carbonates provided natural high ground from chert-enriched limestones. On a smaller scale, erosion of these same rocks produced karrens (or "cutters") that provided natural rock-lined trenches for defending troops. Story Source: The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Geological Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. Journal Reference: Scott P. Hippensteel. Carbonate rocks and American Civil War infantry tactics. Geosphere, 2016; GES01266.1 DOI: 10.1130/GES01266.1 Cite This Page: Geological Society of America. "How rocks shaped the Civil War." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 March 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160317185227.htm>.
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How rocks shaped the Civil War

How rocks shaped the Civil War | Historia! | Scoop.it
The most studied battleground from the American Civil War, from a geological perspective, is the rolling terrain surrounding Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Here, the mixture of harder igneous and softer sedimentary rocks produced famous landform features such as Cemetery Hill and Little Round Top that provided strong defensive positions for the Union Army.
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Here’s Every Chromebook Shortcut You’ll Ever Need by Ben Stegner

Here’s Every Chromebook Shortcut You’ll Ever Need by Ben Stegner | Historia! | Scoop.it
Are you looking for a master list of keyboard shortcuts for your Chromebook? Here is every key combination you'll ever need for Chrome OS!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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The French Revolution: Ideas and Ideologies | History Today

The French Revolution: Ideas and Ideologies | History Today | Historia! | Scoop.it
Edmund Burke was one of the first to suggest that the philosophers of the French Enlightenment were somehow responsible for the French Revolution, and his argument was taken up, and elaborated on, by many historians, including Tocqueville and Lord...
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The Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Google Cultural Institute

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Google Cultural Institute | Historia! | Scoop.it
Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. It prohibited discrimination in public places, provided for the integration of schools and other public facilities, and made employment discrimination illegal.
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Mercy Street

Mercy Street | Historia! | Scoop.it
Engage with important themes from the Civil War era with content from the new PBS drama Mercy Street, along with our webseries Time Capsule from the producers of PBS Digital Studios's The Good Stuff.
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The American Civil War explained in 10 minutes [video]

The American Civil War explained in 10 minutes [video] | Historia! | Scoop.it
After the Revolution, the American Civil War was the defining event in American history. So clearly it’s important to understand what the deal is with this nation-defining event.
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10 Astonishing Facts About America's Founding Fathers - Listverse

10 Astonishing Facts About America's Founding Fathers - Listverse | Historia! | Scoop.it
Many of us will recognize the majority of names on this list, having learned about their integrity, honor, and imprint on American history. However, many o
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15 Vintage Online Map Collections to Explore

15 Vintage Online Map Collections to Explore | Historia! | Scoop.it
These collections let you explore vintage subway maps, globes from the Enlightenment, and real and imagined worlds.
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Free Technology for Teachers: How to Clip and Share a Portion of a YouTube Video

Free Technology for Teachers: How to Clip and Share a Portion of a YouTube Video | Historia! | Scoop.it
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200 Free Kids Educational Resources: Video Lessons, Apps, Books, Websites & More

200 Free Kids Educational Resources: Video Lessons, Apps, Books, Websites & More | Historia! | Scoop.it
Get free K-12 video lessons; mobile apps; audiobooks, ebooks and textbooks; foreign language lessons; test prep materials; and web resources for kids!
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Student Choice and Viral Videos

Student Choice and Viral Videos | Historia! | Scoop.it
By creating and self-producing viral videos about their PBL topic, thinking like filmmakers will enhance students' ownership and deepen their learning.
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Nixon Policy Advisor Admits He Invented War On Drugs to Suppress 'Anti-War Left and Black People'

Nixon Policy Advisor Admits He Invented War On Drugs to Suppress 'Anti-War Left and Black People' | Historia! | Scoop.it
Dan Baum, writing in support of drug legalization at Harper’s, has unleashed a frank 1994 quote from former Nixon policy advisor John Ehrlichman, and as inadvertently salient an argument for legalizing drugs as any I’ve ever seen:...
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Nine influential speeches that changed the world

Nine influential speeches that changed the world | Historia! | Scoop.it
From Patrick Henry's “Give me liberty, or give me death” to FDR's “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” we have selected nine of our favourite speeches that have changed the world: Napoleon Bonaparte — “Farewell to the Old Guard” After suffering several setbacks in the Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon was forced to abdicate his throne on April 6, 1814. At the time of the abdication, he gave a speech praising his faithful soldiers and generals who had stuck by him: "Soldiers of my Old Guard: I bid you farewell. For twenty years I have constantly accompanied you on the road to honor and glory. In these latter times, as in the days of our prosperity, you have invariably been models of courage and fidelity. With men such as you our cause could not be lost; but the war would have been interminable; it would have been civil war, and that would have entailed deeper misfortunes on France. I have sacrificed all of my interests to those of the country." Source: Speeches That Changed The World Georges Jacques Danton — “Dare, Dare Again, Always Dare” Given during the tumult of the French Revolution, Danton urged his fellow French citizens to mobilize in order to push back the invading Prussian forces. The speech was inspiring, but also chilling, as Danton pushed for those not supporting the war efforts to be put to death: "At such a moment this National Assembly becomes a veritable committee of war. We ask that you concur with us in directing this sublime movement of the people, by naming commissioners who will second us in these great measures. We ask that any one refusing to give personal service or to furnish arms shall be punished with death. We ask that a set of instructions be drawn up for the citizens to direct their movements. We ask that couriers be sent to all the departments to notify them of the decrees that you proclaim here. The tocsin we are about to ring is not an alarm signal; it sounds the charge on the enemies of our country. To conquer them we must dare, dare again, always dare, and France is saved!" Source: Speeches That Changed The World Giuseppe Garibaldi — Speech to his Soldiers In the mid 19th century, Giuseppe Garibaldi led a military movement to liberate the various Italian kingdoms from Austrian rule and create a unified modern nation of Italy. Garibaldi gave this speech in 1860 to rally his troops for further action to unify the nation: "To arms, then, all of you! all of you! And the oppressors and the mighty shall disappear like dust. You, too, women, cast away all the cowards from your embraces; they will give you only cowards for children, and you who are the daughters of the land of beauty must bear children who are noble and brave. Let timid doctrinaires depart from among us to carry their servility and their miserable fears elsewhere. This people is its own master. It wishes to be the brother of other peoples, but to look on the insolent with a proud glance, not to grovel before them imploring its own freedom. It will no longer follow in the trail of men whose hearts are foul. No! No! No!" Source: Speeches That Changed The World Patrick Henry — “Liberty or Death” On March 23, 1775, Patrick Henry stood and delivered a riveting speech to the Constitutional Congress in Richmond, Virginia. The speech had the impact of causing a resolution to narrowly pass the Congress that led to Virginia joining the American Revolution: "It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, “Peace! Peace!” — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!" Source: Speeches That Changed The World Abraham Lincoln — “The Gettysburg Address” Delivered on November 19, 1863, the address was delivered at the Gettysburg cemetery. The speech was given at a ceremony dedicating the cemetery as the National Cemetery: "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this." Source: Speeches That Changed The World Winston Churchill — “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat” Upon first entering the British House of Commons as the Prime Minister, Churchill gave a speech rallying the country to war against Nazi Germany. Delivered on May 13, 1940, the speech was a call-to-arms aimed at uniting the British public against the threat of the Nazis: "I would say to the House, as I said to those who have joined the government: “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.” We have before us an ordeal of the most grievous kind. We have before us many, many long months of struggle and of suffering. You ask, what is our policy? I will say: It is to wage war, by sea, land and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark and lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy. You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: victory; victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival." Source: Speeches That Changed The World Franklin D. Roosevelt — First Inaugural Address Roosevelt delivered his First Inaugural Address on March 4, 1933 at the heart of the Great Depression in the US. Speaking to the concerns of Americans throughout the country, Roosevelt sought to ease the fears of his citizens and highlight what the country would do to resuscitate the economy: "So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. And I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days." Watch the speech below: Source: Speeches That Changed The World John F. Kennedy — Inaugural Address When taking the oath of office on January 20, 1961, Kennedy uttered perhaps one of the most famous lines in US political history. Kennedy's speech was intended to inspire his audience and unite the USA against the threat of Communism: "In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility — I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it. And the glow from that fire can truly light the world. And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man." Watch the speech below: Source: Speeches That Changed The World Martin Luther King Jr — “I Have a Dream” Speaking on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, King gave one of the most famous speeches in US history on August 28, 1963. Imploring the nation to abandon its racial hatred, King shared in the speech his dream of the future of the nation: "I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." Watch the speech below: Source: Speeches That Changed The World Read more: • One man killed after a suspected car bombing in west Berlin • Royal Bank of Scotland is axing jobs at its investment bank • POLL: The key reason Brexit will win Read the original article on Business Insider UK. © 2015. Follow Business Insider UK on Twitter. More about: Speechesfamous speechesMartin Luther KingPresident John F KennedyWinston Churchill
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How Teachers Are Using ‘Hamilton’ the Musical in the Classroom

How Teachers Are Using ‘Hamilton’ the Musical in the Classroom | Historia! | Scoop.it
Eighth-grade history teacher Lois MacMillan makes no secret of her enthusiasm for Alexander Hamilton. She wears a T-shirt that says, “If Hamilton can write 51 essays in six months I can probably make it through the day” — a little-known reference to his prolific Federalist Papers output. She debates fellow teachers about the relative historical significance of Hamilton versus Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. And when the soundtrack for the hit Broadway musical Hamilton came out in September, more than a dozen former students made sure she knew, intuiting that MacMillan, who considers Hamilton her “historical boyfriend,” would adore it. And she does: After hearing the 46-song soundtrack, she knew instantly that the music needed to find its way into her classroom. MacMillan isn’t the only teacher to feature the soundtrack from Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s mesmerizing hip-hop and rap musical about Alexander Hamilton, in her classroom, though she may be the most decorated and far-flung. An Oregon history teacher of the year in 2006, MacMillan is one of a growing number of intrepid U.S. history teachers, most of whom haven’t set foot in the Richard Rodgers Theatre on 46th Street, who are harnessing the Hamilton phenomenon to inspire their students. “This has just given us a cool factor beyond any means,” said Justin Emrich, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at the Olentangy Berkshire Middle School in Galena, Ohio, who brought Hamilton to his students after seeing a clip of Lin-Manuel Miranda performing at the White House. “They are obsessed with this thing right now,” he said. Teachers are using the music in various ways, with multiple educational goals. Andrea Moverman, who teaches U.S. history to 11th graders at Millennium Brooklyn High School, used snippets of songs to provoke interest in the Revolutionary War. “I played the beginning of ‘Guns and Ships,’ and then asked them, ‘What was our secret weapon?’ ” she said, referring to Hamilton’s friend and ally, Marquis de Lafayette, which the song soon reveals. “The kids wanted more,” she added. “They said, ‘Keep playing it!’ ” To help her students understand the arguments for and against creating a national bank — a subject many kids might find snooze-worthy — Moverman played the song Cabinet Battle #1, which pitted Alexander Hamilton in a rap duel against Thomas Jefferson. Her students’ delight over this exchange prompted Moverman to assign rap battles as projects; she divided kids into competing sides and asked them to craft arguments in rap form. One of her favorite rap battles: two opposing camps debating the legacy of Supreme Court Justice John Marshall, some representing plaintiffs and others defendants, and all relying on major court cases to make their case. “I’ve rethought almost all my projects after this rap battle was so successful,” she said. Lois MacMillan also assigned historical hip-hop raps for her eighth-graders, all of them grounded in historical documents. They performed their rap debates on a variety of issues — the soldiers’ conditions in the American Revolution, the virtues of Henry Knox, the legacy of various British kings — in front of their class. Teachers insist that the learning goes beyond composing and memorizing catchy lyrics. Using excerpts from biographies, Hamilton’s correspondence, clips from the soundtrack and other primary documents, Emrich’s eighth-graders try to discern if Hamilton’s character caused his death. MacMillan’s main educational goal in focusing on Hamilton is to underscore the primacy of writing. Alexander Hamilton wrote his way out of poverty, she said, and she reminds her students that skilled writing is the clearest sign of scholarship — and the best way to rise up and alter your circumstance. For his part, history teacher Dr. Jim Cullen, who will be offering an elective course for 11th and 12th graders on the musical Hamilton at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School in New York, will ask students to delve into three themes: looking at a period of history through one person’s eyes, studying the artistry of the play itself and exploring how non-historians understand the past. Like MacMillan and Emrich, Cullen uses primary sources to ground the course in scholarship. “They are learning at such a deep level,” Emrich said of his students. Hamilton is especially galvanizing for the student who believes that stories about 18th century America are distant and irrelevant. For many history teachers, making “ancient” subjects come alive is their biggest challenge. “As much as we’d like to make it exciting, history is mostly about a bunch of dead guys,” Emrich said. Hamilton works in the classroom — and the theater — because these founding fathers aren’t bloodless, two-dimensional cutouts who devoted their lives to abstract principles. Rather, they’re husbands, rivals, fathers, friends, lovers — all of them human, and afflicted with vices along with their virtues: pride, arrogance, anger, envy, lust and greed. Emrich’s students are so emotionally involved in the music and the story of Alexander Hamilton that some blew up when they learned about his extramarital affairs. “Some kids were destroyed by his infidelities; that’s how passionate they are,” Emrich said. One hopeful student wrote Miranda and invited him to the school. Eighth-graders in MacMillan’s U.S. history class are equally enthralled with Hamilton, both the man and the music. “I’ve memorized the soundtrack,” said Alexandra Baksay, who added that she’s never felt for a historical figure the way she does about Alexander Hamilton. Her classmates, many of whom have read David MuCullough’s mammoth account of the Revolutionary War, 1776, while preparing their rap battle assignments, nicknamed her “AH” in honor of Hamilton. “He was a super-inspiring person who took advantage of his brilliant mind and changed the world for the better,” said classmate Elie Lindsey. Briony Bowman chimed in: “The musical aspect made it a lot more fun, and easier to learn about Alexander Hamilton.” The complexity of the material she’s encountered while studying Hamilton, adds Jenna Robinson, has improved her understanding of language arts. And the racial diversity of the cast, Alexa said, “is really empowering.” None of these students in Grants Pass, Oregon, has seen Hamilton performed in New York. But starting in April, some 20,000 public school students in New York City will be given tickets to the play for a mere $10 each. The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, a nonprofit devoted to improving history education, was awarded a substantial gift from the Rockefeller Foundation to make the play accessible for kids who otherwise wouldn’t likely see the show — a deprivation felt by many for the sold-out play. To make the performance more than a fleeting experience for the students, and to help teachers guide discussions, Gilder Lehrman has provided an online reservoir of resources on Alexander Hamilton, including primary sources, videos and essays. Teachers needn’t let geographic or economic obstacles, nor their unfamiliarity with modern music, keep them from introducing Hamilton to their students. “I had to learn what hip-hop was,” said MacMillan, who tends to prefer jazz. “It just turns on kids,” she added, especially those who find history sedating and lifeless. At least 100 kids at her school have downloaded the soundtrack; they play it nonstop at lunch, and several performed the opening number from the play at the school’s talent show. Andrea Moverman in Brooklyn encourages teachers to try just snippets of songs in the class if the whole soundtrack feels overwhelming; use it as a hook to engage and introduce a subject, she suggested. Justin Emrich, on the other hand, advises teachers to listen to the entire soundtrack. “You will be emotionally connected to Hamilton at the end of the music, and you’ll want to use the soundtrack,” he said. Either way, he added, “You’ve got to use this thing! It’s awesome!” EXPLORE: BIG IDEAS, CREATIVITY, EMBODIED LEARNING, HAMILTON THE MUSICAL, MUSIC
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Trains of the American Civil War

The trains of the American Civil war played a pivotal role in who won and who lost. The trains allowed the exchange of needed items quickly, and when the tra...
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Rosa Parks’ Archive Goes Digital - History in the Headlines

Rosa Parks’ Archive Goes Digital - History in the Headlines | Historia! | Scoop.it
With a few clicks of the mouse, it’s now possible to view thousands of the civil rights icon’s papers and photographs.
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They fed the civil rights movement. Now are black-owned barbecue joints dying?

They fed the civil rights movement. Now are black-owned barbecue joints dying? | Historia! | Scoop.it
SMOKE SIGNALS | A trip through the South explores the African American ties to a beloved traditional cuisine.
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