Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
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Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
documents/ ressources pour les nouveaux programmes de Terminale L/ES
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Rescooped by Ann-Laure Liéval from Geography Education
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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

La mondialisation: flux aériens, et poids des hubs.

Utile aussi en Première géo pour l'EDC sur Roissy, hub mondial. 

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 

Proche-Orient, un espace de conflit


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs. 

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:
Les espaces maritimes et la mondialisation
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.