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Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
documents/ ressources pour les nouveaux programmes de Terminale L/ES
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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 11, 4:44 PM

This was an excellent portrayal of the middle east. The using of maps accompanied by side paragraphs explains the long history which is necessary to know if one is to understand its current status. When learning about different realms and regions (that existed throughout history) I always find it on a map. In order to truly understand a certain empire, one must know its geographical setting and its significance. It helps me better understand the region. These maps, specifically the ones that are changing through the domains reign, are extremely helpful in better comprehending the misunderstood middle eastern region. This website also creates more thought. If a particular map captivates the reader they can do more research on the topic. However, the "slides" do stand alone portraying much knowledge to a wide variety of specific elements that are still ongoing. The grouping of the slides by region/conflict/country was also an excellent strategy. It shows organization which in turn develops an easier learning process. 

The initial map educates many people of how what is modern day Iraq used to be an Oasis. However, over time, due to over farming and soil erosion the landscape changed to dry/desert territory. 

The maps displaying the rise of Islam and its transitioning into the Ottoman Empire give a great perspective as to the amount of land it covered. The Islamic world thrived and was very advanced in there culture in regards to medicine and arithmetic. The shear size of the empires should increase ones respect of the Islamic theatre. What many people are not aware of is how the Ottoman Empire was knocking on the door of the Holy Roman Empire during the sixteenth century. This was quite an advancement of territory crossing through much of eastern Europe ending as far west as Vienna. A lot of what is Eastern Europe today was part of the Ottoman Empire, including Greece. 

Another excellent map that contributes to the better understanding of western involvement can be seen in the carving up of the Ottoman Empire post WWI. Colonialism was very much present throughout less developed regions so the carving up of the middle east was not an exotic concept to the victorious west. Territories/countries were created and ethnic groups dominated one another. Its certainly true a western presence has contributed to prior and existing issues throughout the middle East.

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

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Walled World

Walled World | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Mondialisation et frontières: les murs dans le monde. 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 2014 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 5:13 PM

To say the area of the Golan Heights is futile would be a drastic understatement. This area of land bordering Syria and northern Israel is of great importance to both of these sets of people. Over 40 years ago Israel claimed this land for their citizens because of it's high elevation and prime access to water supplies.Now in modern times Syria is making drastic moves to claim the land ,which they believe belongs to it's citizens. It is in the persistence of both of these sets of people that turmoil is being created. This is an important ares to both of these groups of people.If Syria is persistent in their attempts to claim this region it is fearful that Israel may need to fight back at some point. With these two countries at odds with each other it is possible more countries may also get involved.

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Pour le chapitre Afrique 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 10:37 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine

The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

le Proche Orient, territoire en conflit

 

The shape of a state can greatly impact the political cohesion of a country as well as it's economic viability.  While this is obviously a fictitious map, it draws our attention to the logistic difficulties that confront Palestine with the Israelis controlling crucial transportation access points and corridors.   

 

Questions to Ponder:  How is the a 'persuasive map?' What are some of the geographic impacts of this fragmentation on Palestine? For Israel?

 

Tags: cartography, MiddleEast, political, states, territoriality, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Melissa Burr's comment, October 10, 2012 10:13 AM
This map is persuasive because it does not show the usual Palestine. This map is fragmented and the geographic impacts it shows are the routes taken in at leisure for maritime activity and also shows the urban and popluated areas in the past and how how the sraelites impact those areas.
Matthew Jones's comment, October 10, 2012 10:16 AM
The reason this is a persuasive map in my opinion is that this map does a very good job of allowing the reader to understand the focus in which it intends to present. information key which it offers is crucial to the map b/ it help the reader better understand and analyze this map in its entirety. as far As the second question unfortunately I am not very knowledgeable as far as the impact his map as on palestiine or isreal.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 10, 2012 11:24 AM
This map is unique and not typical. The way that Palestine's land is severed and each transportation access point is clearly shown and highlighted, makes this map's data very persuasive and impactful. This map examines the Israelis' control of the land.
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des cartes pour représenter ke monde: The Real World at Night

des cartes pour représenter ke monde: The Real World at Night | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:29 AM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
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Disputed Isles: Tensions Chine/Japon

Disputed Isles: Tensions Chine/Japon | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

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Violence escalates in divided Venezuela

Violence escalates in divided Venezuela | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelan security forces and demonstrators faced off in streets blocked by burning barricades in several cities on Thursday in an escalation of protests against President Nicolas

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Géo: le continent américain entre tensions et intégrations, voici un exemple de tensions internes au venezuela

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:24 AM

Venezuelan people are not happy with the socialist government that is taking place in their country.  Violent protests are being held in the streets hoping for some sort of change.  These protests are causing some major problems as well.  With the protests wreaking havoc in the streets, businesses are choosing not to open up for business, causing a greater negative impact on the economy.  Also the fact that news stations are not broadcasting any reliable information about what is going on with the protests is turning people to social media.  This can be a good thing until the information presented becomes unreliable because of people providing falsified information as well as images.  If the government would listen to the people to find out what they want maybe something could work out to stop the violence, arrests and injuries that are occurring as a result of these protests. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 17, 2014 1:55 PM

I think that Maduro should relinquish power and let the people choose their own leader. Continuing with such an absurd dictatorship is not good for anybody, especially an economy of third world that needs the support of other countries for sustain. It's sad to see people fighting for their rights and being attacked by their own advocates.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 1:36 PM

Violent government protesting is on the rise and its mostly led by students. The citizens of Venezuela are protesting the socialist government, led by president Nicolas Maduro. Since his election in April 2013 he has been blamed for violent crime, high inflation, product shortages and repression of opponents, like a dictatorship.  protesting has escalated causing Venezuelan security forces to create burning barricades in the streets. over the last week there has been 5 recorded deaths.

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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Religion et société aux EU: les mormons, l'essor de la LDS church dans le monde depuis la fondation au 19e siècle mis en carte . 

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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 10:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 5:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:30 AM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 5:13 PM

To say the area of the Golan Heights is futile would be a drastic understatement. This area of land bordering Syria and northern Israel is of great importance to both of these sets of people. Over 40 years ago Israel claimed this land for their citizens because of it's high elevation and prime access to water supplies.Now in modern times Syria is making drastic moves to claim the land ,which they believe belongs to it's citizens. It is in the persistence of both of these sets of people that turmoil is being created. This is an important ares to both of these groups of people.If Syria is persistent in their attempts to claim this region it is fearful that Israel may need to fight back at some point. With these two countries at odds with each other it is possible more countries may also get involved.

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


Via Seth Dixon
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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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Enclaves

Enclaves | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
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Kristin Owens's comment, February 13, 2013 5:13 PM
This is amazing! It's a concept my kids seem to have difficulty grasping!
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 

Proche et Moyen Orient en crise


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The New World: Des cartes pour représenter le monde

The New World: Des cartes pour représenter le monde | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Une lecture géopolitique du monde en TLES

 

An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 

Proche-Orient, un espace de conflit


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Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:03 PM

What a powerful image and message that is being represented.As a geography student and someone who is newly learning of this area this segregation was a surprise to me.

 

Israelis are able to access all roads while Palestinians are forbade from doing the same. Palestinians are restricted to only roadways and passages that are outlined in white.I was also interested to know that the officials that enforce these rules are able to tell if someone is of Palestinian decent by the color of a your license plate. This seems to be such an unfair practice. It does not seem that Palestinians are treated as equals in this area.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs.