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Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
documents/ ressources pour les nouveaux programmes de Terminale L/ES
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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


Via Seth Dixon
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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 1, 2013 11:41 AM

Watch this HUGGERS for a great review!

Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

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Africa Next

Africa Next | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

LAfrique et ses stéréotypes inversés

 

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2014 3:55 PM

This video, especially the song shows how many people of the west try to solve the problems of other countries, and "save" them, without really putting themselves in their shoes.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.