Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
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Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012)
documents/ ressources pour les nouveaux programmes de Terminale L/ES
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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 11:10 AM
unit 6
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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:
Les espaces maritimes et la mondialisation
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before

Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it

"London-based design firm BERG created these two 3D maps of Manhattan, which look like a scene out of "Inception" (via Curbed NY)."


Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

des cartes..

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Lola Ripollés's comment, May 12, 2013 4:18 AM
Amazing!
Christopher Chris Benoit's comment, May 14, 2013 3:20 AM
Wow
gokhanht's comment, May 18, 2013 3:59 AM
great article
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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Histoire geo Terminale (programmes 2012) | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.