Histgeog
1.2K views | +1 today
Follow
Histgeog
The entwining of history and geography
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Europe's Languages Were Carried From the East, DNA Shows

Europe's Languages Were Carried From the East, DNA Shows | Histgeog | Scoop.it
Geneticists have uncovered evidence of a westward migration in Europe about 4,500 years ago—and that may explain a long-standing mystery about language.

Via KEpps, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

American Civil War: Daily Gains

"See every day of the American Civil War unfold as the Union fights against the Confederacy to reunite the country in a bitter struggle."

 

The Civil War was a crucial moment in American history, a bitter struggle for the nation’s future and, depending on how you look at it, it was basically over before it began.  Looking at a dynamic map of the war shows just how hard-pressed the Confederacy was from the start — and how the Union attacked from all sides to crush the South.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | Histgeog | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Landsat Flyby

"The Landsat program is the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface, and continues to deliver both visually stunning and scientifically valuable images of our planet. This short video (download here) highlights Landsat's many benefits to society."


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:00 PM

another great bit of info from Seth

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:34 PM

Environmental change at a variety of scales 

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance
Scoop.it!

Integrating Geography and History

Integrating Geography and History | Histgeog | Scoop.it

""This 18-stanza poem by Kit Salter, beautifully captures the importance of geographic thinking in any history/social studies curriculum.  This was shared by Dr. Vernon Domingo and the slides of his keynote address titled, Integrating Geography and History are available here."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 26, 2014 1:48 PM

It was my privilege to hear my good friend and fellow geo-evangelist, Dr. Vernon Domingo share ideas on the importance of integrating geographic analysis in historical inquiry.  He shared a fabulous poem by Kit Salter, one of the pioneers in the Network of Geographic Alliances.  I'll only share the first stanza here:


    How can there be a separate scene,
    For history without place
    How can there be events in time,
    For which there is no space?


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography educationspatial, historical.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

9 maps that reveal London's secret history from Shakespeare till today

9 maps that reveal London's secret history from Shakespeare till today | Histgeog | Scoop.it
From unsolved murders to pagan burial sites, London's shocking history in topographical form

Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Malmci@Spatialzone
Scoop.it!

Port Adelaide Enfield Local History

Port Adelaide Enfield Local History | Histgeog | Scoop.it
Malmci@Spatialzone's insight:

An interesting use of an interactive map to show and locate historical information

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

How Cultures Move Across Continents

How Cultures Move Across Continents | Histgeog | Scoop.it
Researchers have mapped the travels of 150,000 artists, politicians and religious leaders over the past 2,000 years. The videos reveal how cultural achievements ebb and flow across the U.S and Europe.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 8, 2014 8:24 AM

Interactive map of migration of the west

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York

Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York | Histgeog | Scoop.it
This historical collection of USGS 15 minute topographic maps dates from the 1890s to the 1950s. Geographic coverage is complete for New Hampshire and nearly complete for the rest of New England.

 

This is a great warehouse of historical maps of New England.  The picture above what is today South Providence and Cranston, but in 1894 the area around the lakes was a part of the City of Cranston.  Why would the city of Cranston 'lose' territory?  When did this happen?  This is just one example of the questions in historical geography that this resource can inspire.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicholas Ellis's curator insight, March 15, 2:10 PM
Interesting look at some historic maps of New England and New York. 
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Video - Expansion of Amsterdam in the Seventeenth Century

An Amsterdam City Archives production.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
Mathijs Booden's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:45 AM

Some cities sprawl uncontrollably. Dutch cities tend not to, due to e.g. the historically high cost of reclaiming swamps, the need to fortify against European invaders and more recently the high population density. This animation shows the development of some of the earliest expansions of Amsterdam, the iconic canals.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

The Invasion of America - YouTube

Please visit our interactive map: invasionofamerica.ehistory.org Between 1776 and 1887, the United States seized over 1.5 billion acres from America's indige...

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 28, 2014 8:26 AM

visualization and modeling of the way the nation grew and how Indian nations were invaded and taken.

The map is even better and there is documentation of the "treaties" and agreements but not the suffering of the people.

.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Here are the 32 countries Google Maps won’t draw borders around

Here are the 32 countries Google Maps won’t draw borders around | Histgeog | Scoop.it
This post has been corrected. Google may be standing up to government surveillance, but on Google Maps it shies away from conflict. The company displays the borders of 32 states differently than the other 162 members of the United Nations. Many of these countries have long had disputed borders or are currently facing military conflicts. Google Maps is customized in...

Via Nancy Watson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

A New World Order...

A New World Order... | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"People outside Independence Hall examining a new map of Europe before the end of WW1, in Philadelphia, October 1918" http://pic.twitter.com/pJIYeXJuj6 ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Historical Geography of Whaling

The Historical Geography of Whaling | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"Summer 2014 brought a sight that had not been seen since 1941: the Charles W. Morgan leaving the Mystic River for the Atlantic Ocean, stopping at several New England harbors before eventually arriving in New Bedford, Massachusetts where the ship was built in 1841. The Charles W. Morgan is the last remaining wooden whaling ship in the world, and a National Historic Landmark."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2014 4:57 PM

Only two countries today are stilling whaling (Japan and Norway), but the whaling industry was a critical component to the settling of New England.  Check out this Maps 101 podcast for short introduction to the historical geography of New England whaling.  


Tagspodcast, Maps 101, historicalbiogeography.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus: Crash Course World History 215 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th centu...

Via Allison Anthony, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The most famous trips in history

The most famous trips in history | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"An interactive map to explore history's greatest journeys, from Magellan to Kerouc." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Carmen Arias 's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:41 PM

Interesting!

David Baker's curator insight, October 27, 2014 1:15 PM

I shared this with many social studies teachers. Helping students to explore interactively is a great tool to build interest and gain perspective.

Treathyl Fox's comment, February 24, 1:51 PM
WOW! Cheap travel and vacation. Fun, educational and can go there right from your laptop! Two thumbs up for this share.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge

Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"Every summer solstice, tens of thousands of people throng to Stonehenge, creating a festival-like atmosphere at the 4,400-year-old stone monument. For the 2015 solstice, they will have a bit more room to spread out. A just-completed four-year project to map the vicinity of Stonehenge reveals a sprawling complex that includes 17 newly discovered monuments and signs of a 1.5-kilometre-around ‘super henge’.

The digital map — made from high-resolution radar and magnetic and laser scans that accumulated several terabytes of data — shatters the picture of Stonehenge as a desolate and exclusive site that was visited by few, says Vincent Gaffney, an archaeologist at the University of Birmingham, UK, who co-led the effort."

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, remote sensing, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Renata Hill's comment, September 16, 2014 5:14 PM
Fascinating. Thank you for posting!
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire | Histgeog | Scoop.it
2000 years ago today, the Roman Emperor Augustus died. His reign marked the start of a 200-year period of peace and prosperity for the empire.

Via Pasi Lintinen, Aki Puustinen, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Explore old maps of US cities

Explore old maps of US cities | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"This cool new historic mapping app from the folks at esri and the U.S. Geological Survey is worth exploring.  What it does is take 100 years of USGS maps and lets you overlay them for just about any location in the nation. That allows users to see how a city – say Harrisburg – developed between 1895 and today.  The library behind the project includes more than 178,000 maps dating from 1884 to 2006."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:20 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 



Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, historical.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:25 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 

 

Chicago (1868)Denver (1879) Los Angeles (1880)Washington D.C.(1851)New York City (1836)San Francisco (1859)
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, August 14, 2014 12:40 AM
古今地图对比
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Histgeog | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.

Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

human migrations

human migrations | Histgeog | Scoop.it

 

Covers:

* Home erectus in Africa and Eurasia
* Neanderthals in West Eurasia
* Homo sapiens in eastern Africa

* The Toba catastrophe

* Europids 
* Negrids 
* Khoisanids - and epicanthic fold

 


Via Community Village Sites, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Iraq: 1,200 Years of Turbulent History in Five Maps

Iraq: 1,200 Years of Turbulent History in Five Maps | Histgeog | Scoop.it
The region once known as the cradle of civilization has seen significant changes.

Via Timothy Roth, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Malmci@Spatialzone from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Because Washington Crossed the Delaware

Because Washington Crossed the Delaware | Histgeog | Scoop.it

"This podcast explains the route that Washington and his troops took while crossing the Delaware River. Listeners will also discover the pivotal importance that this victory played on the Revolutionary War and American history. To read this entire article, please visit Maps101.com and to listen to our entire podcast collection, please visit Stitcher.com"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.