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iPad-OldSchool-vs-NewAge.jpg (1500×900)

iPad-OldSchool-vs-NewAge.jpg (1500×900) | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
andrew mulinge's insight:

I'm not sure how I feel about this image. Part of me wants to say that books should never be considered "old school". Books are timeless. There is nothing quite like reading one and having a physical copy in your hand. Maybe I am being a traditionalist, but I don't think it's time to consider books old school. I understand that the ipad has brought forth revolutionary innovation to not just education but the entire society. It would be more efficient to avoid the usage of laptops. I am just afraid of the ramifications of transitioning to an all ipad world. How will this change the mindset of how our youth? We can already see issues in the classroom today by having them cause distractions. But another problem I have seen is students' realiability on it to answer questions that they could have easily found in the textbook. This may just indicate their preference to find information online. But what this does is create a watered down way of researching habits by this generation of students. Everything can be found through a google search and I think that poses a problem in the long run when it comes to fully understanding material and developing reading comprehension. It can also be good thing too. What difference would it make if a student were to find the correct answer on a website and in their textbook? As long as they understand the answer, maybe it shouldn't matter? I'm still skeptical but we'll see where it goes. 

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Mixed reaction to iPad rollout from L.A. teachers and administrators

Mixed reaction to iPad rollout from L.A. teachers and administrators | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
It would seem Robert J. Moreau, a computer animation teacher who struggled for grants to set up a lab, would be among the first to applaud the $1-billion iPad program in the Los Angeles Unified School District .

Via Sam Gliksman
andrew mulinge's insight:

My question about giving a $700 machine to a student is how can you ensure they won't lose it, sell it or have it stolen? What happens when these things happen? To students who are already facing financial difficulty as it is, how would they expect them to pay? I don't see ipads to be as important as paying rent or food for a month. But this is something to consider for sure as not every student will return it. 

 

Teachers also are not too sold on how it does not work properly. Along with the inevitable distractions students will bring by having an ipad, the functionality of the ipad is in question. Some schools simply do not have the infrastructure in to maintain wifi for several hundred ipads in one place. Maintaining the ipads require routers in place that withstand a massive amount of bandwith. In addition, it is very expensive for the school to keep the ipads up to date, as well as frustrating for the teachers who have to learn a new app every quarter.

 

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iPad Apps and Other Resources to Teach Students about Mandela's Life ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

iPad Apps and Other Resources to Teach Students about Mandela's Life ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it

"One of the most iconic freedom fighter has just left us a couple of days ago leaving behind him a huge legacy for next generations to learn from. Nelson Mandella's life was a genuine fight for human rights and justice and it was thanks to his civil activism that apartheid was abolished in South Africa. The fight for freedom cost Nelson so dearly, 27 years of his life was spent in prison. The lessons we can draw from  Nelson's eventful life experiences are inestimable and here are some of the teaching resources I have curated fro you to help yu teach your students about this legendary man."


Via John Evans
andrew mulinge's insight:

This caught my attention because of the icon associated with the title --- Nelson Mandela. A few days ago, my cousin who is a special education teacher in Richmond, posted his frustrations on Facebook about how a student said "Who is Nelson Mandela and why the hell should we care"? My cousin found this quite disturbing but at the same time, he used it as a teaching moment for him and the student. 

 

At my middle school, every student has an ipad that they use daily. The usage of the ipad vary from warm-up activities to homework assignments. Students of this generation coincide more and more with technological innovations like the ipad. This particular app celebrating Nelson Mandela is another example of how learning can can be done through apps in exchange for books. Students love to play games and love to use their ipads. Incorporating critical information in the apps not only allow the student to learn a great deal but it's also fun. I would suggest that my cousin consider using different techniques through the internet to teach students like that about Madiba. 

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rwestby's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:24 PM

February, African-American History Month, would be a great time to implement these resources for teaching students about this iconic human rights activist. 

Souleymane DIAO's curator insight, December 9, 2013 4:11 AM

@scoopit via @joevans

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Historically black college cancels students' health plans

Historically black college cancels students' health plans | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
(Campus Reform) Officials at one one of the nation’s oldest and most elite historically black colleges are citing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as the reason they have cancelled a school-wide affordable health care plan they had offered students.

Via Poppen Report
andrew mulinge's insight:

African Americans voted for President Obama with 93%  overall response in 2012 (95% in 2008). With this strong correlation so apparent, I wonder how African American students are reacting to circumstances such as the ACA hiking the cost of healthcare for the school from $50 to $900 per semester. In particular, I am curious to see how these policies, if implemented by another president would be protested against. Could perhaps another means of health care be more efficient for students other than the ACA? In addition to HBCUs, how else does the ACA effect families across the country? 

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The Daily Tar Heel :: Black universities struggle with retention

The Daily Tar Heel :: Black universities struggle with retention | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Historically black colleges across the country have pointed to student retention as the biggest problem facing institutions today.

...

 

A very nice article interviewing SCUP's director of planning and Education Phyllis Grummon, as well as administrators from Winston-Salem State University and Elizabeth City State University.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
andrew mulinge's insight:

HIstorically black college and universities have provided the means of education for many afirican americna sin the past and in the present as well. One of the main issues that is decreasing retention is the lack of financial support for most students. At prestigious institutions across the world, the alumni is a valuable asset to the success of the students. My concern is where are the alumni from these schools? Given the names of significant alumni at for example Howard, why is it that they are near backrupt? Where is the support? How can we garnish more support for alumni so HBCUs don't become extinct in the next decade?

 

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Drake to build recording studio for Strawberry Mansion High School - Philly.com (blog)

Drake to build recording studio for Strawberry Mansion High School - Philly.com (blog) | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Philly.com (blog)
Drake to build recording studio for Strawberry Mansion High School
Philly.com (blog)
Grammy-winning hip-hop artist Drake is giving back to a local school in a very big way. In a clip aired on ABC News Wednesday, ...

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

Not only should teachers be using rappers in some capacity to engage students but I think it may even be more important for the rappers to be positive images for the students as well. Due to corporate control of the media, unfortunately many hip-hop artists we hear on the radio are talking about things that are not always beneficial for those listening to the songs. Drake is one of those rappers that occasionally participates in songs that are flat out detrimental to women and black people. However, outside of what songs they choose realease is the giving back principle. If these rappers truly cared about the students they are tring to encourage, we wouldn't have such negative correlations to corporatized hip-hop. I commend Drake for using his celebrity and influence to encourage students into using the studio he's providing. We need more rappers giving back to the youth.

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Bringing Hip-Hop to Education in a Meaningful Way - TakePart

Bringing Hip-Hop to Education in a Meaningful Way - TakePart | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Bringing Hip-Hop to Education in a Meaningful Way TakePart The students operate within and around a professional recording studio to which they earn access by completing academic projects-each informed by hip hop and its philosophy-in the core...

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

Seidel brings in an interesting component that wasn't discussed in the other articles. He mentioned how not only using hip-hop in the classroom is but also using it as a means to spark project-based learning so students can learn from the community and create output that could be used by that community. Part of reason why students are not engaged is because of the lack of relevancy the material has on their lives. One of the components of hip-hop that Seidel mentioned was "keeping it real". In order to engage students, you need to provide methods and material that is relevant and important to culture and everyday lives. This philosophy is very vital not just in using hip-hop in the class but in general with all students. In my experience mentoring disadvantaged youth, the vast amount of students would express how much they hated reading. But when they engaged in freestyling (improvisional rapping) with one another they would use creative ways to show off their vocabulary. I see it as exactly what this article was talking about. The students have the capacity to achieve, they just need a methodology and style of learning that will allow for them to connect more with their lives and culture. In other words, they need the teachers to "keep it real" with how they relay material to them. 

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Hip Hop Remixes Science

You're invited inside Bronx Compass High School to witness the first day of Science Genius, a revolutionary pilot program which uses hip hop culture to teach...

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

This was actually the video that sparked my interest in the hip-hop education topic for the class. I thought it was particularly encouraging to see how they were using "culture as an anchor of instruction." He took the students' interest and capitalized on that by building their confidence before the topic of science was even mentioned. Just mentioning hip-hop sparked their interest and attention because it was something they were familiar with already. Then when one of the students said "I'm not good at science" because it involved too much "smartness," the hip-hop instructor convinced them how hip-hop requires a lot of smartness too. Building the confidence with students allows them to feel more comfortable with the material presented in the class. I thought was excellent how the students not only incorporated photosynthesis into their rap, but how much fun they had doing it. Once in a while students should be given an outlet to creatively express what they are learning in the classroom.

 

Coming from someone who is intimidated by science and math, more lessons like this could have helped me build more confidence in high school. I know I had the aptitude but I did not neccessarily have the interest to apply it all the time. I also love to write poetry in my free time. I did incorporate science and music one time. It wasn't a rap, but in my AP Psych class in high school, I took Alicia Keys' song "Superwoman" and switched it to "Superneuron". I learned how to play the song on piano and I "attemped" to sing my version of the song that addressed things like synaptic gaps and neuron transmitters. It was a fun activity where I was able to apply what we were learning in class into music. I had a better understanding of the material and I had fun doing it too. Those students did as well. 

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Craig YoungMoney Baldwin's comment, January 14, 2014 12:15 PM
I was never that good at Science so I think that this is a great idea and not only should they have to use hip hop and rap but they should Incorporate all genres of music in to teaching weather it be teaching math, english, social studies, or as show Science.
Craig YoungMoney Baldwin's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:19 PM

I was never that good at Science so I think that this is a great idea and not only should they have to use hip hop and rap but they should Incorporate all genres of music in to teaching weather it be teaching math, english, social studies, or as show Science.

Maria Victoria DeChristofano's curator insight, February 22, 2014 8:22 AM

This is Genius!

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Apple unveils lighter iPad Air

Apple unveils lighter iPad Air | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Thinner. Lighter. Faster. That's what Apple promises in its newest iPad, which also has a new name: the iPad Air.
andrew mulinge's insight:

Apple has the tendency to provide new products every year. An ipad for example from 2 years is ancient by today's society's standards. When we're on the subject, what would happen when the ipad 5 or 6 comes out in a few years. This article is an example of technological overload. Too much innovation in education takes away from the important things about education in the first place. Innovation is great but then too much dependency on companies like Apple can create what I would like to call "Technological-Industrial Complex". Apple is dishing out new stuff every year and then before you know it, they will be having contracts with school districts and there would be this businessification of school technology innovation. Much like the private corporations controlling our prisons (prison-industrial complex) where building prisons for profit is a thing now. Also private military companies that have contracts with the US military (military industrial complex). It pays to have war frankly. I fear that this dependency on technological innovation will be detrimental to the intregrity of improving education for students. It certainly will be a means of a profit driven model from Apple. 

 

One day, maybe in the next 3 years or so the current ipads won't be cool or hip to the students anymore because there's something that is "10 times better" on the market. And since they are so expensive, it would not behoove the powers that be to invest another $1 billion in new ipads. It just isn't practical. That money can go towards paying teachers more and providing for sustainable after-school programs. Not towards fancy toys that are going to be considered on the level of a VHS in 3 years. 

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5 Problems with iPads in Education

5 Problems with iPads in Education | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Thousands of high schools have jumped on the tablet bandwagon and adopted one-to-one iPad programs. This year, over 600 districts in the US are piloting iPad programs and more are considering it.
andrew mulinge's insight:

One of my quarrels with having ipads in a classroom of middle schoolers is the inevitable distractions that come along with such a sophisticated piece of equipment. I have seen students in my class play a certain game involving pressing a cookie repeatively in order to achieve a high score. The object of the game is still unclear to me. But was is clear, is that for all the ipad can be useful for, it can also be a major distraction.

 

In the article the author mentions my concerns about the ipads causing a disruption to the class. Students cannot fight the urge to play with it during class which leads to my teacher usually mentioning to turn off the ipad and ban them from going on the internet or youtube. Depsite these instructions, there will still be some students who will find a way to still play. The students not only cause a disruption to class by the teacher stopping instruction to tell them to stop, they also take up a lot bandwith needed to surf the internet faster for everyone in the classroom and hallway. When every student is playing this game, it really effects the students as a whole. But for the reason why it's a distraction, it also is needed. Otherwise what would be the point in having an ipad with no internet? It would just be an really shiny, expensive toy that isn't being optimized to its fullest. 

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Twitter / AJCProject: "Structural racism does not require malicious intent. Even racially neutral policies can have racially disparate effects." -MHP #nerdland

andrew mulinge's insight:

Melissa Harris-Perry brought up a good point this morning in relationship to the downfall of HBCUs. Even though policies do not directly target African Americans, the effects on the community are still very apparent. When Congress over the summer voted to increase student loan rates, it disporportionately effected black students at HBCUs. At schools like Winstem Salem State for example, over 80 of students are dependent on student loans and financial aid. When programs like the Parent Plus loans are cut, HBCU students are hit the most. So although these policies are not neccessarily a direct attack towards African Americans, they definitely feel the full brunt of it when a bickering, unproductive Congress cannot pass a bill that would help students. 

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Obama metrics would hurt historically black colleges: Column - USA TODAY

Obama metrics would hurt historically black colleges: Column - USA TODAY | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Obama metrics would hurt historically black colleges: Column USA TODAY In fact, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) would suffer from each metric proposed by Obama, mostly because using general measurements for these institutions...

Via Ritchard Summers
andrew mulinge's insight:

"How do you define a satisfactory undergraduate college experience? Does it mean that you graduate in four or six years? Does it mean that you carry a lower student loan debt than others do? Does it mean that you earn lots of money?"


This was the beginning of the article that discussed how the Obama administrations policy is hurting HBCUs. But I think the broader question posed in the beginning of the article brings up a very important point. How do we measure success in our educational experience? Because how we define success can help in determining the issues that are associated with HBCUs in the first place. For example, when considering the income disparities associated with black families and white families, the effects of Pell Grant cuts, financial aid cuts and student loan cuts will disporportionately effect black students the most. Many black students rely on these programs in order to attend school. As tuition rates increase by the year, it deters marginalized communities from completing in four to six years. And for even those who guaduate from HBCUs in four to six years will still carry more debt than any other type of institution. So even though they find degrees, they are still enslaved to their loans at a higher rate. If you graduate, you occur debt. If you dont, you will not have the same opportunities for employment as others and statistically will not make as much money. The "problem" I think that may not be perceived as a problem is the such high demand for college students.  Undergraduate degrees have become worthless in many cases, yet we have more students enrolled than ever. But as enrollment increases, so does the tuition and so the cycle continues.

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10 Things Universities Could Be Teaching Students Through Hip-Hop - Complex.com

10 Things Universities Could Be Teaching Students Through Hip-Hop - Complex.com | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
10 Things Universities Could Be Teaching Students Through Hip-Hop
Complex.com
10 Things Universities Could Be Teaching Students Through Hip-Hop.

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

There shouldn't be a cap of when to use hip-hop in education. Older students can benefit just as much as a six-year old student. There was several classes that I could see being taught at a university. I think we are only touching the surface of deconstructing the further meanings behind hip-hop. I think it would be extremely valuable for college students to not only connect with a relevant form of music in education but it would allow the for critical thinking skills to develop. Hip-hop is a great platform for that type of critical thinking to occur.  Although music is meant to be social there is an academic appeal that should also be addressed through the lyricism. Students of all ages can really benefit from songs that artists put out meant to educate and even songs that weren't meant to do so but provide a platform for students to learn as well. 

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Flocabulary - Dividing Fractions - Keep, Change, Flip

See the full lyrics and lesson plan at http://www.flocabulary.com/divide-fractions/ This educational hip-hop song uses the 'Keep, Change, Flip' mnemonic to t...

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

Two components commonly found in hip-hop are incorporated into this song. The first component is repetition. This song's chorus, listed below was mentioned several times througout the song.  

 

"Keep, change, flip, yeah that’s the action,
Everybody’s gonna know how we’re dividing fractions.
Keep, change, flip, yeah that’s the action,
Everybody’s gonna know how we’re dividing fractions." 


By using this phrase repeatively, the listener cannot help but start rapping it by the end of the song without knowing. It has been a few minutes after I played the video and it's still running in my head. This is often the case for hip-hop songs we hear today and have heard over its history. The repetition helps us to unconsciously think and recite the song even when we are aren't listening anymore. It's catchy and without knowing, after hearing the song maybe only 3 times, you may find the courage to confidently rap some lyrics in a karakokee. The benefits for this in the classroom is the catchy choruses can highlight important concepts in the material. 


Another component of this song that relates to hip-hop esthetics is the call and response. The call and repsonse is embedded in African culture. Many tribes used to use call and response to communicate with tribesmen that were a far away. This song can be rapped/sung by more than one person. It actually sounds better if more people were involved. This would be a perfect way for a classroom to learn a catchy song (with valuable information) while participating with others in the class in an engaging and fun way. 



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Students unleash their musical creativity in Wake Forest classroom - WRAL.com

Students unleash their musical creativity in Wake Forest classroom - WRAL.com | Andrew Mulinge Newsletter | Scoop.it
Students unleash their musical creativity in Wake Forest classroom
WRAL.com
“I told him I rap and produce, and he had me spit a verse for him,” said Walker, a junior. Walker met up last year with classmate Trevor Shores, who also recorded music.

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
andrew mulinge's insight:

This is a great example of adding entreprenurial traits into the classroom by using hip-hop. Not only are the students gaining an understanding of the material, but they are learning valuable information on how record companies work and how to run a business. They are learning through experiencing and benefitting directly from what they are learning. And I believe that to be one of the best ways to learn something--- by practicing and benefitting directly from it. Most of the material we usually learn in the classroom, stays in the classroom. Every now and again, we should develop ways carry out the material in the real world context.

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