Higher Education Teaching and Learning
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Higher Education Teaching and Learning
Issues and priorities arising around academic development, teaching and learning in Higher Education.
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Teacher Agency: Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset

Teacher Agency:  Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

It is a myth that we operate under a set of oppressive bureaucratic constraints. In reality, teachers have a great deal of autonomy in the work they chose to do in their classrooms. In most cases it is our culture that provides the constraints. For individual teachers, trying out new practices and pedagogy is risky business and both our culture, and our reliance on hierarchy, provide the ideal barriers for change not to occur. As Pogo pointed out long ago, “we have met the enemy and it is us.” http://www.cea-ace.ca/blog/brian-harrison/2013/09/5/stop-asking-permission-change

Educational psychology has focused on the concepts of learned helplessness and more currently growth-fixed mindsets as a way to explain how and why students give up in the classroom setting.  These ideas can also be applied to educators in this day of forced standardization, testing, scripted curriculum, and school initiatives.

 

 

 


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Wynne Boliek's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:41 PM

It is a myth that we operate under a set of oppressive bureaucratic constraints. In reality, teachers have a great deal of autonomy in the work they chose to do in their classrooms. In most cases it is our culture that provides the constraints. For individual teachers, trying out new practices and pedagogy is risky business and both our culture, and our reliance on hierarchy, provide the ideal barriers for change not to occur. As Pogo pointed out long ago, “we have met the enemy and it is us.” http://www.cea-ace.ca/blog/brian-harrison/2013/09/5/stop-asking-permission-change

Educational psychology has focused on the concepts of learned helplessness and more currently growth-fixed mindsets as a way to explain how and why students give up in the classroom setting.  These ideas can also be applied to educators in this day of forced standardization, testing, scripted curriculum, and school initiatives.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/

 

 

Blanca Fondevila's curator insight, January 31, 3:11 PM

A serious problem that must be solve..

 

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 5, 9:12 AM

Teacher Agency:  Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...

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What Core Skills Do Teachers Need To Be Effective? | LEARNing To LEARN | Professional Development

What Core Skills Do Teachers Need To Be Effective? | LEARNing To LEARN | Professional Development | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

“Teaching is complex work that people actually have to be taught to do,” says Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the School of Education at the University of Michigan. Ball spent years as an elementary school teacher and was always praised for being a “natural,” but she says teaching never came easily. She worked hard at her job.

Now, she’s trying to dramatically change teacher training to focus on the specific knowledge and skills that teachers need to effectively help students. Understanding math and knowing how to teach it are two separate skills. And understanding how to teach math well doesn’t come naturally.

People who want to be teachers “deserve to learn how to do this work well,” Ball says. “And the children that they teach particularly deserve to have those teachers taught.”

 


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nuria's curator insight, October 20, 2015 3:36 PM

añada su visión ...¡Cómo aprender a enseñar lo que se sabe eficazmente¡¡


Sonia Santoveña's curator insight, October 21, 2015 11:31 AM

añada su visión ...

Tony Palmeri's curator insight, October 24, 2015 3:42 PM

I chose this resource because I was interested in seeing what the identified "core skills" that characterize an effective teacher are. I totally agree that "how to teach" is a skill and not necessarily a skill that is intuitive or easily learned. It must be taught intentionally to practitioners. Those directing the teacher education program identified 19 core skills that a novice teacher must have. Not surprisingly, many of these traits like "reflective practice" and designing an appropriate learning sequence are generic. I especially like the idea that we must interpret student thinking. Too often, when a teacher sees a struggling student they advise them of the "right way" to answer a question or solve a problem. But understanding a student's flawed thought process is valuable and it allows a teacher to attend to root problems that will hinder future learning. 

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Heutagogy: designing for self-directed learners

Heutagogy: designing for self-directed learners | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
While acknowledging that the whole concept of self-determination – or ‘Google
learning’ as it has been called, pejoratively, in certain circles – is fraught with the potential for missing the point, being distracted into rabbit warrens or just getting bad information, we would like to emphasise that this is only a potential.


===> Any learning theory is only as good as the way in which it is applied and worked through, and we have seen it produce highly successful results where correctly applied, in the right circumstances. <===


Watch this space for chapter and verse, as we will soon be publishing case studies of several recent programmes that feature high levels of learner self-direction.

Learners are changing, learning is changing – and heutagogy can give important clues about rebalancing the burden of responsibilities and permissions in an always-on, networked, instructorless, post-course world.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=andragogy


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy


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Will Stewart's curator insight, November 28, 2014 10:34 AM

A useful graphic for learning designers.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, December 1, 2014 12:05 PM

Heutagogia  e o olhar sobre a aprendizagem do século XXI:


1- protagonizar a própria aprendizagem

2- educadores mantem foco no processo de aprendizagem ao inves do conteudo

3- evita-se aprendizagem focada no educador 

4- migra-se para o "mundo da aprendizagem"

5- explora e aprende praticando auto escolha e acao auto direcionada

6- avancar alem da disciplina


#avancee

Tony Guzman's curator insight, December 1, 2014 3:41 PM
This learning theory may be beneficial in certain settings. Anyone applying it already?
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The next generation of education system [Infographic]

The next generation of education system [Infographic] | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This info-graphics provides the information about tutoring for high school students and befits and import ants of Online education system.

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Jess Ojeanto's curator insight, September 22, 2014 6:26 PM

agregar su visión ...

Gary Harwell's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:36 AM

Where do we fit in?

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 23, 2014 4:05 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension

Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

This is quite a clever and helpful device to tie together a large number of ideas about Bloom's Taxonomy in the Cognitive Domain. I highly recommend that interested readers visit the website and play with it. It's done quite well (although it would be even better if the few misspellings were attended to). Access it at http://eductechalogy.org/swfapp/blooms/wheel/engage.swf

 

But this gets me up on my soapbox because it highlights quite a significant oversight, in my opinion.

 

When Benjamin Bloom wrote his original work, he spoke of 3 domains, not just one. All 3 were, and are, of roughly equal importance in educating young people. The other 2 are the Affective Domain and the Psychomotor Domain. These correspond roughly to what, in today's parlance, might be called Social and Emotional Learning (Affective) and Mental and Physical Health (Psychomotor). Too much (or too little) emphasis on any one of the domains almost guarantees a lack of balance in childrens' learning and development. We can see this in the pejorative, hurtful names students call their peers when one of the domains assumes an unblanced priority over the others. Cognitive imbalance can lead to students being called eggheads or nerds, Affective imbalance to students being called geeks or loners, and Psychomotor imbalance to students being called dumb jocks or crazies.

 

It seems to me that the standards movement and the high-stakes testing movement have come to represent an educational environment that is seriously out of balance...with far too much emphasis on the Cognitive Domain, and too little on the Affective and Psychomotor. We have too many students who excel in one domain, and too few who are well rounded in two or three, as well as too many who do not reach their potential in any.

 

Furthermore, the emphasis on the separation of the Cognitive from the Affective and Psychomotor, has created structural imbalances in the operation of schools (read allocations of time, financial and material resources, personnel, and intellectual energy) that work to the detriment of our young people and our communities.The drive toward home schooling and charter schools can be viewed as two manifestations of this structural imbalance...increasing numbers of parents view schools (especially public ones) as unsuitable places to send their children and clamor for alternatives that offer a better balance among the 3 domains.

 

This is a great graphic organizeer, but it represents only an exaggeratedly large part of a much more important whole. -JL

 

 


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Tina Jameson's curator insight, August 1, 2014 12:20 AM

http://eductechalogy.org/swfapp/blooms/wheel/engage.swf

 

Interactive animation that breaks down the 'wheel' - includes suggested 'tools' that could be used for different related activities.

Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, November 6, 2015 8:58 AM

A tad skeuomorphic for my tastes but the thinking behind it, is great…

Sonia Salgado's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:06 PM

Para el diseño de actividades y determinación de RED.

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How to build a learning worker mindset

How to build a learning worker mindset | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

Why in this day and age, it is important to become a “learning worker”, and that for me  “learning to learn” doesn’t just mean “learning how to study” in formal courses. etc – although that’s a part of it, but nowadays it also means:

building a habit of continuous, everyday learning – and keeping your eyes and ears constantly open and learn from everything around youextracting the learning from your work experiences – this, after all, is how most of how we learn to do our work takes place – as we do our job keeping up to date with what’s happening in your industry and profession – not just by going to an annual conference or reading a few industry magazines – that pretty much tells you what’s happening now, not what’s happening next – the place to find that out is in on the Social Web, in your professional social networksrecognising serendipitous learning – the accidental, unplanned learning that takes place everyday as a consequence of other things.

 

For me, this is the new work of learning professionals – one that involves helping and supporting individuals – rather than creating and delivering one-size-fits-all content!

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 26, 2015 10:22 AM

Why in this day and age, it is important to become a “learning worker”, and that for me  “learning to learn” doesn’t just mean “learning how to study” in formal courses. etc – although that’s a part of it, but nowadays it also means:

  • building a habit of continuous, everyday learning – and keeping your eyes and ears constantly open and learn from everything around you
  • extracting the learning from your work experiences – this, after all, is how most of how we learn to do our work takes place – as we do our job 
  • keeping up to date with what’s happening in your industry and profession – not just by going to an annual conference or reading a few industry magazines – that pretty much tells you what’s happening now, not what’s happening next – the place to find that out is in on the Social Web, in your professional social networks
  • recognising serendipitous learning – the accidental, unplanned learning that takes place everyday as a consequence of other things.

For me, this is the new work of learning professionals – one that involves helping and supporting individuals – rather than creating and delivering one-size-fits-all content!


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/


Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:38 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Nocking The Arrow: Self-Directed vs. Self-Determined Learning; What's the Difference?

Nocking The Arrow: Self-Directed vs. Self-Determined Learning; What's the Difference? | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

In this age of abundance of information, shifting classroom pedagogy isn't nearly enough to make learning in school more relevant and authentic for the learner. Self-directed learning (andragogy), and self-determined learning (heutagogy) are the ideals necessary in making students "future ready" to live and learn in a web connected world.


While original research applied these concepts to mature learners, it has become apparent that even young children have an abundant capacity for recognizing and directing their own learning. Anyone who has observed toddlers learning how to walk and talk understand the motivation and skill development that quickly develops during these processes.


Considered by some to be on a learning continuum, self-directed learning and self-determined learning have at least one distinct difference. What is this difference, and why should educators care? - See more at: http://rtschuetz.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/self-directed-vs-self-determined.html?spref=tw#sthash.oSVChVeN.dpuf


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=andragogy


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy



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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 2, 2015 8:45 PM

In this age of abundance of information, shifting classroom pedagogy isn't nearly enough to make learning in school more relevant and authentic for the learner. Self-directed learning (andragogy), and self-determined learning (heutagogy) are the ideals necessary in making students "future ready" to live and learn in a web connected world.


While original research applied these concepts to mature learners, it has become apparent that even young children have an abundant capacity for recognizing and directing their own learning. Anyone who has observed toddlers learning how to walk and talk understand the motivation and skill development that quickly develops during these processes.


Considered by some to be on a learning continuum, self-directed learning and self-determined learning have at least one distinct difference. What is this difference, and why should educators care? - See more at: http://rtschuetz.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/self-directed-vs-self-determined.html?spref=tw#sthash.oSVChVeN.dpuf


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=andragogy


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy


Dorote Lucci's curator insight, February 3, 2015 5:56 PM

Great insights- this can be applied to other fields as well such as learning techniques to modulate stress and anxiety

Shafeeq Husain's curator insight, February 4, 2015 1:59 AM

Since "upwards of ninety percent of our learning will occur outside formal educational settings" (Jennings, 2010), in the age of abundance of information, students should be motivated to reflect on how they are learning. That is what is self-directed learning

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5 Heutagogical Tips to Empower Lifelong Learners Online | Andragogy | Heutagogy

5 Heutagogical Tips to Empower Lifelong Learners Online | Andragogy | Heutagogy | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This post is for educators who want to learn more about heutagogy and implement strategies that empower lifelong learners online.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=andragogy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:26 AM
This post is for educators who want to learn more about heutagogy and implement strategies that empower lifelong learners online.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=andragogy


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Heutagogy


Tim Hopper's curator insight, November 25, 2014 5:18 PM

Interesting idea for ePortfolio pedagogy.  Maybe the idea is to consider andragogy and heutagogy as distinct from pedagogy, or at least an evolution from it.

Philippe-Didier Gauthier's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:45 PM

#Apprenance.  Heutagogie ?  pédagogie active favorisant l'apprentissage dans l'action, de l'action, par l'action, pour l'action, après l'action, au travers le d'action.

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Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

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Chris Carter's comment, July 10, 2014 4:36 PM
Humility makes sense. Socrates knew that he was ignorant, and therefor was ready to learn. If I think that I already know a thing, or do not need to know a thing, then my mind is closed to it. All learning starts from a point of ignorance, and then move to greater approximations of understanding until mastery.
Srimayee Dam's comment, July 10, 2014 4:43 PM
Absolutely! Most are unable to do so, unwilling to learn .. Being ignorant is fine, but lack of humility won't ever help
umh1467's curator insight, July 11, 2014 9:57 AM

Es evidente que sólo si crees que puedes aprender lo harás.