Higher Education Teaching and Learning
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Higher Education Teaching and Learning
Issues and priorities arising around academic development, teaching and learning in Higher Education.
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Rescooped by Kim Flintoff from Eclectic Technology
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What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning

What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
If you’re an educator, surely you know that technology has and will continue to have an incredible impact on learning.

The talks are in split into the following categories:

* General - learn about making technology work in education and more.

* Sharing education - exploring open, shared education.

* Creativity and innovation - new ways to foster innovition and the creative spirit.

* Internet and new media - how does the Internet and new media impact teaching and learning?

* Leadership -new leadership skills.

* Educational technology - explore technology made for education.

* Brain and Psychology - how does the brain work?

* Technology education - what is the state of technology education?

* Teaching methods - check out innovative teaching methods.

* Institution - how does technology impact institutions.


Via Beth Dichter
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Ken Morrison's comment, September 30, 2012 2:23 AM
Thank you for the rescoop. It looks like you have a great site here!
Ken Morrison's comment, October 3, 2012 1:39 AM
Thank you for the rescoop Charles
Ken Morrison's comment, October 3, 2012 1:39 AM
Thank you for the rescoop Charles
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

How to Fuel the Innovation Engine in Learning

How to Fuel the Innovation Engine in Learning | Higher Education Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

Can creativity be taught? If innovation is truly the key to this country’s success, then it’s time to think strategically about engendering creativity into our education system.

 

That’s part of Tina Seelig’s thesis in her new book Ingenius: A Crash Course on Creativity. Case in point: In schools, when we give students math problems to solve, we ask simply, “What’s the sum of 10+10?” to which there is only one right answer. But Seelig says we should turn the question on its head, and ask, “How many ways can you add 10+10?” The question you ask is the frame in which the answers will fall, Seelig says.

 

This approach is fundamental to Seelig’s work as a professor at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. The Institute (or “d.school”), renowned for incubating inventive new businesses, is committed to teaching students about design thinking. And it’s in her course on creativity where Seelig introduces students to her celebrated Innovation Engine, which she says represents all the values we need to unlock creativity.

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