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Architectural design and physical activity: Staircases Versus Elevators Versus Attractive Staircases

Architectural design and physical activity: Staircases Versus Elevators Versus Attractive Staircases | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

The indoor built environment has the potential to influence levels of physical activity. However, the extent to which architectural design in commercial buildings can influence the percentage of people choosing to use the stairs versus elevators is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if buildings with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases result in a greater percentage of people taking the stairs.

METHODS:

Direct observations of stair and elevator use were conducted in 3 buildings on a university campus. One of the buildings had a bank of 4 centrally located elevators and a fire escape stairwell behind a steel door. The other 2 buildings had centrally located staircases and out-of-the-way elevators.

RESULTS:

The percentage of people who ascended the stairs was 8.1% in the elevator-centric building, compared with 72.8% and 81.1% in the 2 stair-centric buildings (P < .001). In addition, the percentage of people who descended the stairs was 10.8% in the first building, compared with 89.5% and 93.7% in the stair-centric buildings (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the current study suggest that if buildings are constructed with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases, a greater percentage of people will choose to take the stairs."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Given an attractive staircase as an alternative, many more people will walk both up and down than ride the elevator.

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mehgostar's comment, July 3, 2016 8:52 AM
Elevators reduces the physical activity.http://iranbalabarco.com/home/
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Pittsburgh's "breathing" building by Gensler aims to be the world's greenest skyscraper

Pittsburgh's "breathing" building by Gensler aims to be the world's greenest skyscraper | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The PNC Financial Services Group hopes to exceed LEED Platinum requirements while promoting a healthy workplace with a recent development – the Tower at PNC Plaza. Located in downtown Pittsburgh, the building will be 800,00 sq.ft (74,322 sq.mt) with a construction budget of approximately US $240 million.


The "breathing" design created by architecture firm Gensler moves away from the traditional closed air-conditioned environment and has the lofty aim of becoming the greenest skyscraper in the world.


Employees in the 33 floor glass tower will access daylight and fresh air. The PNC Tower design recognizes that the Pittsburgh climate can provide increased levels of natural light onto the floorspace along with improved regulation of temperatures for much of the year without using traditional, energy-intensive HVAC systems. The Tower hopes to achieve this with a double-skin facade of two panes of glass separated by an enclosed cavity, allowing external air inside. The facade features operable doors and windows that admit fresh air into the building during optimal conditions, while a solar chimney is another passive system- it pulls air in through the open windows, the air then travels across the floors, is heated and exhaled through the roof shaft.


The Tower will consume less than 50 percent of the energy a typical office building uses and will save PNC at least 30 percent on its energy costs...


Via Lauren Moss
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP–49, the Society for College and University Planning's 49th annual conference, will be held in Pittsburgh in July 2014.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:07 PM

Tall buildings have been historically less efficient than smaller squarer buildings to operate, but now with new technologies we are seeing rapid improvements in the taller buildings and FINALLY we are seeing things like operable ventilation once again.