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Does the scientific journal have a future?

Does the scientific journal have a future? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

This summer, scholars will use the break from teaching to submit manuscripts, review papers and develop new ideas. But even as the major functions of scholarly publishing march on, scholars, publishers and librarians start to ask, “What does the future of the scholarly journal look like?” (...) - by Bonnie Swoger, Blog ' Information Culture', Scientific American, June 18, 2014


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Julien Hering, PhD's curator insight, July 6, 2014 2:35 PM

Science 2.0, open acces archives of pre-print articles, social media measurement of impact of these article... is there a future for traditional publication pathways ? 

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The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment

The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

In September 2011 I returned to work after a year on maternity leave. Many things needed sorting out, not least my digital presence at my home institution, which had switched to a content management system that seamlessly linked to University College London’s open-access repository, “Discovery.” The idea was we should upload open-access versions of all our previously published research, and link to it from our home pages, to aid in dissemination. (...) - by Melissa Terras, Journal of Digital Humanities, Vol. 1, No. 3 Summer 2012


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Using algorithms to link-up researchers

Using algorithms to link-up researchers | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Scientists are developing algorithms that can connect researchers across the world who have similar interests by scanning the content of academic papers. 

Researchers at TEAM, an EU-funded project, are using algorithms to quantify the extent to which scientific papers cover similar ground, and are looking at ways to profile scientists by the documents they have searched for. They are also developing technology that can facilitate searches of research papers. (...) - by Peter O'Donnell, in Horizon, 05 August 2013


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:59 AM

Nonostante l'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione di conoscenza in ambito scientifico forse un giorno non troppo lontano ciò sarà superato almeno in parte .... 

Enrico De Angelis's comment, September 16, 2013 7:03 AM
L'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione è un retaggio del passato. Non è facilmente rimovibile ma il modo SOCIAL di lavorare attraverso i MEDIA, ovvero i vantaggi che questo offre, lo rende sempre meno strategia praticata. Vedremo ...!!!
Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:05 AM

I really think that social media and other tools to research and dig out data from the network will change the Academia and Research world.

We wait for this change (and push).

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There’s something fishy about citations: We need a method of assessing the support of research if we want to change the ‘publish or perish’ culture

There’s something fishy about citations: We need a method of assessing the support of research if we want to change the ‘publish or perish’ culture | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Current citation biases give us only the narrowest slice of scientific support. Bradley Voytek writes that while BrainSCANr may have flaws, it gives the reader a quick indication of how well-supported an academic argument is and could provide a new way of thinking about citations.

Science has a lot of problems. Or rather, scientometrics has a lot of problems. Scientific careers are built off the publish or perish foundation of citation counts. Journals are ranked by impact factors. There are serious problems with this system, and many ideas have been offered on how to change it but so far little has actually been affected. Many journals, including the PLoS and Frontiers series, are making efforts to bring about change, but they are mostly taking a social tactic: ranking and commenting on articles.I believe these methods are treating the symptom, not the problem. (...) - by Bradley Voytek, LSE blog "Impact of Social Sciences", Oct 17, 2012


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