Higher Education and academic research
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Higher Education and academic research
Higher education and academic/non-profit research in the world
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Tool for detecting publication bias goes under spotlight

Tool for detecting publication bias goes under spotlight | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Funnel plots are a popular tool in spotting when scientists in a field leave out negative study results, but one researcher says the method is flawed. (...) - Nature, by Daniel Cressey, 31 March 2017

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Hey scientists, how much of your publication success is due to dumb luck?

Hey scientists, how much of your publication success is due to dumb luck? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Papers are like “lottery tickets,” researchers conclude.


What makes some scientists’ careers take off whereas others’ stagnate? There are personal factors, of course: Some run clever experiments, have good collaborating skills, and are eloquent in communicating their work. But there’s also just dumb luck. Sometimes doing the right experiment at the right time makes all the difference in publishing a paper that wins lots of attention. (...) - Science, by John Bohannon, Nov 3 2016

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Poor citation practices are continuing to harm the humanities and social sciences.

Poor citation practices are continuing to harm the humanities and social sciences. | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Citation and referencing patterns are not trivial things but solid and important indications of the presence of primary academic virtues. Patrick Dunleavy looks at disciplinary differences and argues the poor citation practices in the humanities and social sciences are therefore not just harmful to academics, but to all who read their works or follow after them. To break past such attitudes requires a collective effort to get to a better understanding of the existing literatures on the myriad topics covered. (...) - Blog LSE 'Impact of Social Sciences', by Patrick Dunleavy, Sep 12 2016

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For Open Access Monographs, Peter Pays Paul. Who Pays Peter?

For Open Access Monographs, Peter Pays Paul. Who Pays Peter? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Gold open access for monographs is based on the notion that provosts will pay for what librarians will not. This seems like an improbable model for scholarly publishing. Publishing that is not based on end-user demand is not likely to have strong support in lean times. (...) - Scholarly kitchen, by Joseph Esposito, Dec 3, 2015

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Togelius: How not to review a paper

On occasion of several paper reviews I've received recently, and a few I've written, I'd like to give some useful tips for how to review a paper. That is, how to review a paper if you want to do a really, really bad job of it. Note that I work in the AI and Games field, so somewhat different advice might apply to screwing up a paper review in another field. (...) - Blog of Julian Togelius, July 26, 2015

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Internet a tué les petits éditeurs scientifiques

Cinq gros éditeurs se partagent la moitié du marché des publications savantes, souligne une récente étude. Ce que l’un des auteurs, Vincent Larivière de l’École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'information de l’Université de Montréal, attribue au virage internet. (...) - Agence Science-Presse, par Isabelle Burgun, 18/06/2015

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Will traditional science journals disappear?

Will traditional science journals disappear? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Has the traditional format of the science journal had its day? Dorothy Bishop outlines an alternative model, based on consensual communication (...) - The Guardian, by Dorothy Bishop, 12 May 2015

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CrossRef and DataCite announce new initiative to accelerate the adoption of DOIs for data publication and citation

DataCite and CrossRef have agreed to collaborate to:

- Enhance the interoperability of their respective systems in order to make it easier for publishers, data centres, libraries and third parties to integrate with the scholarly DOI ecosystem.

- Provide comprehensive support for interlinking between articles and data.

- Develop open APIs and open source tools to surface citations and other relationships between publications and data sets. 

- Integrate into their services other existing scholarly communications initiatives such as ORCID and CrossRef’s FundRef.

- Develop systems, workflows and best practices for using DOIs to reference large, highly granular and dynamic data. 

(10 November 2014, Oxford, UK)


Via Tree of Science
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Tree of Science's curator insight, March 13, 2015 7:59 PM

With the huge increase of data in scientific research (+30% every year), the data management becomes now a critical issue and implies also more links of publications to their data. Moreover the community of researchers is going more and more in the open research process to open data and thus improve their reuse (reproducibility), citations, and sharing. 


In this area, DataCite and CrossRef manage around 75 millions DOIs that identify research objects. In order to accelerate their growth with the adoption of DOIs for data publication and citation, they decide to collaborate and improve their interoperability. Other platforms for researchers integrate DOIs:  for data management like Figshare (1 millions) and for scientific blogging like The Winnover.

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The Snarky, Clever Comments Hidden in the "Acknowledgments" of Academic Papers

The Snarky, Clever Comments Hidden in the "Acknowledgments" of Academic Papers | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

In a modern scientific paper, if you cruise past the “Materials and Methods” section and stop right before you hit the “References,” you’ll find the “Acknowledgments” section, wherein authors are given space to thank others for their contributions to the project. It is generally accepted that this paragraph is ignored by both readers and reviewers alike. Accordingly, it is chock full of inside jokes, snarky comments, and general silliness. Here, for your enjoyment, are a few of our favorite examples. (...) - Slate, by Meredith Carpenter and Lillian Fritz-Laylin, 27/12/2013

 

 

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Getting Open Access Embargoes Right: Rational Policy Must Be Evidence-Based

Getting Open Access Embargoes Right: Rational Policy Must Be Evidence-Based | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

A new study, out today, takes a broad look at the usage lives of scholarly journal articles. The information it contains is vital for achieving the balance necessary for Green OA policies to work. (...) - by David Crotty, the scholarly kitchen, Dec 18 , 2013

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The Cost of Knowledge

Academics have protested against Elsevier's business practices for years with little effect. These are some of their objections:

They charge exorbitantly high prices for subscriptions to individual journals.In the light of these high prices, the only realistic option for many libraries is to agree to buy very large "bundles", which will include many journals that those libraries do not actually want. Elsevier thus makes huge profits by exploiting the fact that some of their journals are essential.They support measures such as SOPA, PIPA and the Research Works Act, that aim to restrict the free exchange of information.

The key to all these issues is the right of authors to achieve easily-accessible distribution of their work. If you would like to declare publicly that you will not support any Elsevier journal unless they radically change how they operate, then you can do so by filling in your details on this page.
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Sick of Impact Factors

Sick of Impact Factors | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

I am sick of impact factors and so is science.

The impact factor might have started out as a good idea, but its time has come and gone. Conceived by Eugene Garfield in the 1970s a useful tool for research libraries to judge the relative merits of journals when allocating their subscription budgets, the impact factor is calculated annually as the mean number of citations to articles published in any given journal in the two preceding years. (...) - Blog Reciprocal Space

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Publish or perish thwarts young researchers’ urge to innovate

Publish or perish thwarts young researchers’ urge to innovate | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it
An unbending reward system prevents early-career researchers taking full advantage of the digital world, says Dave Nicholas. Early-career researchers constitute a vast pool of talent. They are the largest group of researchers and their numbers are growing fast. They are essential for enabling research to meet the needs of knowledge economies and, as the League of European Research Universities wrote in 2010, universities’ research crucially rests on their access “to the best talents of the rising generation and the creative influence of the irreverent young”. (...) researchreseasrch.com, byDavid Nicholas
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Publisher pulls 58 articles by Iranian scientists over authorship manipulation

Publisher pulls 58 articles by Iranian scientists over authorship manipulation | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Cull of papers follows similar discoveries in 2015.


A tranche of 58 articles authored by 282 Iran-based researchers were retracted today by a leading scientific publisher, which said it had found signs that the peer review and publication processes had been compromised. (...) - Nature by Ewen Callaway, 01 November 2016

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Journals give more publicity to ‘weak science’

Scientists often bemoan journalists’ shoddy reporting of research findings. But a new study suggests that scientifically illiterate hacks in desperate need of a story might be only partly to blame. It found that journals are more likely to issue press releases publicising the findings of what may be deemed weaker studies than larger, more scientifically significant trials, writes David Matthews for Times Higher Education. (...) - University World News,  Times Higher Education16 January 2016 Issue No:396
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Academics are being hoodwinked into writing books nobody can buy

Academics are being hoodwinked into writing books nobody can buy | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

An editor called me up to ask me if I’d like to write a book. I smelled a rat, but I played along… (...) - The Guardian, 4 September 2015

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Study Finds Nearly All Scientific Papers Controlled By Six Corporations

Study Finds Nearly All Scientific Papers Controlled By Six Corporations | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

The researchers sifted through tons of studies that were published between the years of 1973 and 2013 and found that the studies were overwhelmingly published by the same six publishers. (...) - True Activist, by John Vibes, July 22, 2015

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Scientist registry unveils plan to recognize efforts of peer-reviewers

Movement to publicly record peer-reviewing activity gains momentum.

 

A service developed to track the work of researchers will soon be extended to include records of peer review.

More than 1.2 million people have signed up to use ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID), a registry or 'science passport' that allocates users a unique 16-digit identifier and webpage that they can use to record their publications and grants. And on 18 May, ORCID announced that users would soon be able to record on their profile the many different types of peer review they do. ORCID's executive director, Laure Haak, hopes that the initiative will give researchers greater incentive to take part in the peer-review process. (...) - Nature, by Dalmeet Singh Chawla, 22 May 2015

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Open access "lobby" attacks Elsevier

Open access "lobby" attacks Elsevier | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Academic, library and technology organisations are denouncing a new sharing and hosting policy adopted last month by publisher Elsevier, saying it undermines open access policies at universities and prevents authors from sharing their work.


Via Bernard Rentier
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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:44 AM
Alicia WISE may pretend being surprised by the reaction of "the Open Access Lobby", the new Elsevier policy is meant to intimidate researchers and to combat the rise of institutional repositories which are, from now on, unavoidable, mind her.
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Do academics still need monographs?

Do academics still need monographs? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Results from the survey released by OAPEN-UK have shown that 10% of researchers for whom access to monographs is important, also claim that it is difficult or very difficult to get such access. Among the researchers who stated that access to journal articles is important to them, the share of those who believe it is difficult or very difficult to get this access is twice smaller. Is 10% significant or not? In fact, it is hard to say relying on this survey alone. The research sample consists of 2 (...) -  Open Science, November 14, 2014

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How one publisher is stopping academics from sharing their research

One of the world's largest academic publishers has launched a wide-ranging takedown spree, demanding that several different universities take down their own scholars' research.

Elsevier is a commercial firm that publishes some of the leading journals in many academic fields. In recent weeks, it has sent takedown notices to the academic social media network Academia.edu, as well as to the University of Calgary, the University of California-Irvine, and Harvard University. (...) - by Andrea Peterson, The Washington Post, December 19, 2013

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What is the Lifespan of a Research Article?

What is the Lifespan of a Research Article? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

An analysis of article downloads from 2,812 academic and professional journals published by 13 presses in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals extensive usage of articles years after publication.

Measuring usage half-life–the median age of articles downloaded from a publisher’s website–just 3% of journals had half-lives shorter than 12 months. Nearly 17% of all journals had usage half-lives exceeding six years. (...) - Blog 'the scholarly kitchen', Dec 18, 2013

 

 

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Peer review needs to expand so that more scientists are reviewing papers

Peer review needs to expand so that more scientists are reviewing papers | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

A new tool that selects peer reviewers by algorithm could make the peer review process more reliable, says Richard Price (...) - By Richard Price, The Guardian, 23 October 2013

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