Higher Education and academic research
14.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Higher Education and academic research
Higher education and academic/non-profit research in the world
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

[UK] Academics! You've got to fight for your right to job security

[UK] Academics! You've got to fight for your right to job security | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Universities want to sell themselves as booming businesses, but the rise of zero-hours contracts is a threat to the sector (...) - The Guardian, by Myka Abramson and Harry Stopes, 1 December 2015

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

Research is not the only path to academic success

Research is not the only path to academic success | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

xCo-founder of investment firm says that more early career academics should be encouraged to think about the entrepreneurial route. (...) - Times Higher Education, by John Elmes, October 1, 2015

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Collectif PAPERA from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

We Are The Humanities: How Humanities Prepare Non-Trads for the Business World

We Are The Humanities: How Humanities Prepare Non-Trads for the Business World | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it
Adults seeking pathways to the labor market should not be so quick to dismiss a degree in the liberal arts; soft skills are in hot demand.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
more...
Jill Craven's curator insight, May 24, 2015 10:33 AM

"Some things just go together, like peanut butter and jelly, milk and cookies, Kirk and Spock, study of the humanities and success in the business world."

Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

Consolidation in the voice of researchers in Europe to defend working conditions

Consolidation in the voice of researchers in Europe to defend working conditions | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Research career: the voice of researchers in Europe consolidated through MOU between the two major umbrella researcher representative associations in Europe.

For the first time, active science researchers to have a unified voice representing them on an EU and international level. Indeed, the two major umbrella researcher representative associations in Europe–namely ICoRSA and Eurodoc–have just signed a  memorandum of understanding (MOU) in that sense, announced on 19th June 2014. It enables both organisations to act together to represent the interests of researchers at European level.  Previously, independent efforts of the two associations to represent the interest of researchers were limited and lacked coordination in defending the interests of the entire research community. - See more at: http://euroscientist.com/2014/07/consolidation-voice-researchers-europe/#sthash.Nehvl6VC.dpufFor the first time, active science researchers to have a unified voice representing them on an EU and international level. Indeed, the two major umbrella researcher representative associations in Europe–namely ICoRSA and Eurodoc–have just signed a  memorandum of understanding (MOU) in that sense, announced on 19th June 2014. It enables both organisations to act together to represent the interests of researchers at European level.  Previously, independent efforts of the two associations to represent the interest of researchers were limited and lacked coordination in defending the interests of the entire research community. - See more at: http://euroscientist.com/2014/07/consolidation-voice-researchers-europe/#sthash.Nehvl6VC.dpuf

For the first time, active science researchers to have a unified voice representing them on an EU and international level. Indeed, the two major umbrella researcher representative associations in Europe–namely ICoRSA and Eurodoc–have just signed a  memorandum of understanding (MOU) in that sense, announced on 19th June 2014. It enables both organisations to act together to represent the interests of researchers at European level.  Previously, independent efforts of the two associations to represent the interest of researchers were limited and lacked coordination in defending the interests of the entire research community.(...)  - EuroScientist Webzine, July 2nd, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

University staff frustrated by lack of jobs

University staff frustrated by lack of jobs | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Guardian survey shows that university staff feel burdened by a heavy workload and lack of job opportunities.

 

University staff are frustrated by a lack of job opportunities, a Guardian survey has found.

Of more than 2,000 academics and administrative staff who responded to the survey about their working life, nearly two-thirds cite a lack of job opportunities as the biggest challenge to progressing in their careers.

More than half say that this single issue might make them leave their current institution. (...) - by Kim Thomas and Claire Shaw, The Guardian, 12 May 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

US: Maths degrees pay

Holders of maths master's degree earn more than chemists or biologists.

 

US holders of master's degrees in maths earn more than those with degrees in biology or chemistry, finds a report, Higher Education Pays. Research firm College Measures in Rockville, Maryland, analysed first-year salaries for 15,118 master's holders in various fields from 2006 to 2011. Maths graduates typically earned US$49,280–$59,113, whereas biology graduates earned $35,788–$40,561 and chemistry graduates $47,045–$49,421. The numbers, says College Measures president Mark Schneider, imply high demand for mathematical problem-solving skills. (...) - Nature 501, 451 (2013)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

Too much hype

Too much hype | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Scientists have to promote their work. But they should fight the pull to oversell it, says Monika Maleszewska.

If you had asked me a few years ago what makes a scientist, I would have said curiosity. Now, after almost three years pursuing my PhD, I would probably say political skills. Genuine curiosity does indeed make a good scientist, but the ability to promote one's work makes a successful one. (...) by Monika Maleszewska, Nature 500,113 (2013), 31 July 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

[Canada] Économie du savoir ou démesure doctorale? Les universités sont-elles en train de surqualifier leurs étudiants? - Collectif PAPERA

[Canada] Économie du savoir ou démesure doctorale? Les universités sont-elles en train de surqualifier leurs étudiants? - Collectif PAPERA | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Un court article publié dans le journal interne de l’Université Laval nous a interpellés. On peut y lire que lors d’une journée carrière destinée aux étudiantes et étudiants des cycles supérieurs, François Y. Doré, adjoint du vice-recteur aux ressources humaines et directeur du Bureau des affaires professorales et du personnel enseignant et de recherche, présentait aux participants le marché de l’emploi en enseignement universitaire :

 

« … Les perspectives d’emploi sont excellentes dans pratiquement toutes les disciplines pour au moins les dix prochaines années. Pendant cette période, les universités canadiennes devront remplacer 21 000 professeurs qui partiront à la retraite ou quitteront l’enseignement, le scénario le plus pessimiste étant l’engagement de 9000 professeurs et le plus optimiste, de 15 000. » (...) - Université de Sherbrooke

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

[UK] Careers in academia: Different options

[UK] Careers in academia: Different options | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it
The traditional career path in academia isn’t the only option available for scientists, say panelists at the 2015 Naturejobs Career Expo in London. (...) - Nature, by Julia Gould and guest contributor Gaia Donati, 09 October 2015
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

How much does society lose due to job insecurity in the academic sector?

How much does society lose due to job insecurity in the academic sector? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Job insecurity in academia is bad for researchers, for their disciplines and for society which pays them. These are conclusions from recent „Career Tracking of Doctorate Holders Pilot Project Report”. (...) - Open Science, August 3, 2015

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Collectif PAPERA from Pharmaceutics_R&D
Scoop.it!

Research and development: Outsourcing trends

US contract research organizations are multiplying to meet drug-makers' outsourcing needs.

 

US drug-makers are outsourcing more and more of their research and development, mainly to contract research organizations, according to figures released in July by the US National Science Foundation (NSF). The shift could be good news for researchers seeking positions in industry. In 1991, pharmaceutical companies spent about US$800 million on external research and development, but that skyrocketed to $13 billion in 2011, says John Jankowski, head of research and development statistics at the NSF. That growth outstrips that of any other sector. In 1991, industrial extramural research spending totalled $3.3 billion, but by 2011, spending had risen to $25.3 billion for domestic companies alone. Pharmaceutical firms' share of that total was 23% in 1991, but ballooned to 51% by 2011. Jankowski says that much of the increase comes from the outsourcing of clinical trials. The number of US contract research organizations has risen to match the demand, from around 800 in 2000 to more than 3,100 by the end of 2011, according to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development in Boston, Massachusetts. - Nature 512, 106, 06 August 2014


Via Julien Hering, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

What makes a university career a success or a failure?

What makes a university career a success or a failure? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

A quiet revolution has been going on in the corridors of academia: nowadays, being a success may include having a life outside, says Jonathan Wolff.

A retiring US university president in the 1960s was asked how he had managed to remain so universally popular. He is said to have replied, "I make a point of never discussing sports with alumni, sex with students, or parking with faculty." (...) - by Jonathan Wolf, The Guadian, 20/05/2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

Recruiting university staff takes a lot of academic time

Recruiting university staff takes a lot of academic time | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Hundreds of hours are spent on each appointment, says Jonathan Wolff. But does anyone know a better way?

A friend who worked in a bank told me that academics are prized customers for credit card companies. Our tastes tend to be more expansive and expensive than we can finance with our income, but our salaries are highly reliable and we are not the sort of people to walk away from debts. Furthermore, part of our pension comes in a lump sum, so on retirement we can wipe the by then king-size slate clean. (...) - by Jonathan Wolf, The Guardian, 15 April 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

Researchers’ ‘unrealistic’ hopes of academic careers

Researchers’ ‘unrealistic’ hopes of academic careers | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Fewer than half of those new to research can expect long-term academic careers. 

There is a “significant credibility gap” between researchers’ expectations and the likelihood of their forging long-term careers in higher education, a survey has found. (...) - Times Higher Education, by Elizabeth Gibney, 12 September, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Collectif PAPERA
Scoop.it!

In the Ivory Tower, Men Only

In the Ivory Tower, Men Only | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Rule No. 1 for Female Academics: Don’t Have a Baby

 

For men, having children is a career advantage. For women, it’s a career killer.

In 2000, I greeted the first entering graduate-student class at Berkeley where the women outnumbered the men. I was the first female dean of the graduate division. As a ’70s feminist I cautiously thought, “Is the revolution over? (...) - Slate, by Mary Ann Mason|Posted Monday, June 17, 2013

more...
No comment yet.