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Rescooped by Donna Murdoch from SCUP Links
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Don't Let Strategy Become Planning

Don't Let Strategy Become Planning | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

"But how does a strategic plan of this sort differ from a budget? Many people with whom I work find it hard to distinguish between the two and wonder why a company needs to have both. And I think they are right to wonder. The vast majority of strategic plans that I have seen over 30 years of working in the strategy realm are simply budgets with lots of explanatory words attached. This may be the case because the finance function is deeply involved in the strategy process in most organizations. But it is also the cause of the deep antipathy I see, especially amongst line executives, toward strategic planning. I know very few who look forward with joy to the commencement of the next strategic planning cycle."


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 7, 2013 8:26 AM

Really? "To make strategy more interesting — and different from a budget — we need to break free of this obsession with planning."

Rescooped by Donna Murdoch from SCUP Links
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new journal— Learning Communities Research and Practice

Abstract

Within a 25-year period, the dramatic changes from college education as a “private good” that serves a predominantly white male student population to college education as a “public good”—where almost 90% of high school students of all racial and ethnic backgrounds aspire to attend college—has forced higher education to face a new complex reality: the students present are not the ones we know how to teach. Faced with a series of problems associated with student persistence, retention, and graduation, the challenge for learning community practitioners is to provide evidence to campus leaders that “the magic ingredient” of most successful learning communities—the collaboration between student affairs and academic affairs—does make a difference in student engagement and success. Without evidence and proof, though, learning community programs will not be allocated needed resources. This transcript of a 2007 keynote was given at the 12th Annual National Learning Communities Conference by the statewide director of the P-20 alignment work at the University System of Maryland.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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