Higher Education ...
Follow
Find
2.1K views | +0 today
Higher Education & Privacy
Data Privacy and Online Privacy in Higher Education
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Who Has Your Back? 2013

Who Has Your Back? 2013 | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Which companies help protect your data from the government?

 

Read the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Third Annual Report on Online Service Providers’ Privacy and Transparency Practices Regarding Government Access to User Data (PDF available to download at: https://www.eff.org/sites/default/files/filenode/who-has-your-back-2013-report.pdf)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

50 Must-Read Higher Education Information Technology Blogs 2013

50 Must-Read Higher Education Information Technology Blogs 2013 | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

The best higher ed information technology blogs on MOOCs, cloud computing, mobile learning, social media, digital pedagogy and more. (Submitted and voted on by EdTech readers.)

more...
Higher Ed InfoSec Council's comment, May 1, 2013 8:59 AM
Check out EDUCAUSE blogs (included in this year's list of must-read higher ed IT blogs): http://www.educause.edu/blogs
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

2013 Security Awareness Video & Poster Contest Winners Announced

2013 Security Awareness Video & Poster Contest Winners Announced | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Nine winners of the 5th Annual Information Security Awareness Video and Poster Contest have been selected. The winning videos and posters are now available for colleges and universities to use in campus security awareness campaigns during National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October, student orientations, and throughout the year. 

 

This year's sponsors and supporters include: CyberWatch, the National Cyber Security Alliance, and Google. 

 

Visit the Information Security Guide's Cybersecurity Awareness Resource Library for more campus education, awareness, and training materials.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Policymakers Guide - Security, Privacy & Safety | Microsoft Trustworthy Computing

Policymakers Guide - Security, Privacy & Safety | Microsoft Trustworthy Computing | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Online security, privacy, and safety are often top concerns for policymakers. Microsoft is committed to addressing these concerns by sharing information, technology, and guidance. (Want to learn more about mobile devices & youth safety?


Via Stephen diFilipo, Higher Ed InfoSec Council
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

All you need to know – about yourself (via FT.com)

Acxiom is preparing to step out of the shadows. The consumer data broker, which tracks everything from a person’s estimated income to his political leanings, shopping patterns and exercise habits, is readying a service that will reveal to people what it knows about them.

 

New York-listed Acxiom, which has a market capitalisation of $1.4bn, collects details about more than 700m consumers across the globe and sells them to more than 7,000 clients.


The move to add a new level of transparency to its business practice comes amid mounting regulatory and governmental scrutiny of its multibillion-dollar industry, which include an investigation launched in December by the US Federal Trade Commission.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

"Big Brother, But With Good Intent:" E-Books Tattle on Students Who Don't Do the Reading

"Big Brother, But With Good Intent:" E-Books Tattle on Students Who Don't Do the Reading | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Today’s New York Times offers an upbeat take on a technology that is sure to strike panic into the guts of students everywhere: e-textbooks that tattle on you if you don’t read them.

 

“It’s Big Brother, sort of, but with a good intent,” the dean of Texas A&M’s business school, Tracy Hurley, cheerily told the Times.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

CISOs: From no seat to multiple hats

CISOs: From no seat to multiple hats | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

The CISO role in many enterprises is expanding beyond security risk mitigation to risk management, privacy and regulations, and compliance.

 

"If you have worked in information security for the past 15 years, you have witnessed a maturation in the mission of security that is quite remarkable. In its infancy, security was oftentimes viewed as the troglodytes at the end of the corridor, who focused on analyzing packet streams, firewall logs and anti-virus anomalies...

 

Fast forward to the current day, and you will see a new view of security in many enterprises: security is evolving towards a broader focus in risk management. The responsibility of traditional information security has not decreased in importance or duty, but the mindset and role has certainly become more risk-based in nature for security leaders and many current CISOs. And this is appropriate, as information security management at its core is the mitigation, transference, reduction and elimination of risk to the enterprise."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Letting Down Our Guard with Web Privacy

Letting Down Our Guard with Web Privacy | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
Consumers insist that they treasure their online privacy. But their mouse clicks tell a far different tale, as the experiments of a behavioral economist show.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

How your movements create a GPS 'fingerprint'

How your movements create a GPS 'fingerprint' | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Can you be identified only by where you take your phone? Yes, according to a new study, which finds it's not very hard at all.

 

While most of us are free to go wherever we want, our daily and weekly movement patterns are pretty predictable. We go to work, to school, to church, to our neighborhood gym, grocery store or coffee shop, and we come home -- all quietly tracked by the GPS in our phone.

 

And with nothing more than this anonymous location data, someone who wanted to badly enough could easily figure out who you are by tracking your smartphone. Patterns of our movements, when traced on a map, create something akin to a fingerprint that is unique to every person.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Microsoft 2012 Law Enforcement Requests Report

Like others in the industry, Microsoft believes it is important for the public to have access to information about law enforcement access to customer data, particularly as customers are increasingly using technology to communicate and store private information.

 

This data covers law enforcement requests and/or court orders Microsoft received in calendar year 2012 related to our online and cloud services. Skype data is included, but reported separately, since prior to being acquired by Microsoft in late 2011, Skype collected data in a different format and because Skype continues to operate under Luxembourg law.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Cops: U.S. law should require logs of your text messages

Cops: U.S. law should require logs of your text messages | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley firms and privacy groups want Congress to update a 1986-era electronic privacy law. But if a law enforcement idea set to be presented today gets attached, support for the popular proposal would erode.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Facebook unfriends CISPA cybersecurity bill over 'privacy'

Facebook unfriends CISPA cybersecurity bill over 'privacy' | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Facebook no longer supports a controversial federal cybersecurity bill that would let U.S. companies share personal information with government agencies in ways currently prohibited by privacy laws.

 

The social-networking company had previously applauded the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, which was reintroduced last month. Facebook Vice President Joel Kaplan wrote a letter last February to Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, "to commend you on your legislation," and Rogers sent out his own press release noting Facebook's "strong support" for the bill.

 

But then groups including the American Civil Liberties Union, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and the Republican Liberty Caucus raised privacy alarms. CISPA would "waive every single privacy law ever enacted in the name of cybersecurity," Rep. Jared Polis, a Colorado Democrat and onetime Web entrepreneur, warned during a House of Representatives debate a few months later.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

More Privacy Perils: Facebook Data Is Greater Than The Sum Of Your Likes

More Privacy Perils: Facebook Data Is Greater Than The Sum Of Your Likes | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

New research from the University of Cambridge in England can accurately predict a person's political slant, age, gender and even if they're gay based on their Facebook Likes.

 

The report, Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior, was just posted on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and is coauthored by David Stillwell and Michal Kosinski of the University of Cambridge and Thore Graepel, of Microsoft Research in Cambridge. In the authors’ words, the study shows that, “easily accessible digital records of behavior, Facebook Likes, can be used to automatically and accurately predict a range of highly sensitive personal attributes including: sexual orientation, ethnicity, religious and political views, personality traits, intelligence, happiness, use of addictive substances, parental separation, age, and gender.”

more...
Higher Ed InfoSec Council's comment, March 13, 2013 10:06 AM
The article also states: "There is a corollary here with computer security. The accumulation of too much data about any one entity in a single location poses a threat. In cyber security, this risk is mitigated by dispersing data in such a way that no one bit of it leads to any other. Studies like this one from Cambridge suggest that we may need to think about privacy in similar ways. Using third-party tools to distribute our data among different servers—preferable ones that users possess their own unique encryption keys to—may be the only way to prevent third parties from painting possibly misleading pictures of us without our consent or knowledge."
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

How to Craft the Best BYOD Policy

How to Craft the Best BYOD Policy | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

What is a good BYOD policy? Step one is to clarify the rights of both company and employee and state upfront what's business and what's personal. But there's a lot more to it. In this interview with a technology transactions lawyer, CIO.com explores the do's and don'ts of BYOD policies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer

Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

If we want to protect privacy, we should be more clear about why it is important.

...

[Privacy] is better understood as an important buffer that gives us space to develop an identity that is somewhat separate from the surveillance, judgment, and values of our society and culture. Privacy is crucial for helping us manage all of these pressures -- pressures that shape the type of person we are -- and for "creating spaces for play and the work of self-[development]."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, And Voice Recognition

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, And Voice Recognition | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
Though consumers have demanded a better way to secure their phones besides passwords, they may have had the answer all along without even knowing it: their body parts.

Via Stephen diFilipo, Higher Ed InfoSec Council
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

What Does a Five-Year-Old Know that Our Privacy Laws Don’t?

What Does a Five-Year-Old Know that Our Privacy Laws Don’t? | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

I have three children: twins Rachel and Abby, both age 16 and Jacob, age 14. While in my second year at Eli Lilly and Company nearly a decade ago, my wife, Melisa, had a medical procedure. Jake and I drove Melisa to the doctor’s office for the colonoscopy (although HIPAA does not apply, rules of matrimonial harmony do, so I have received a verbal consent for this disclosure). 

...

At that moment, Melisa, herself an Indiana University Law graduate, looked at me from the front passenger seat and said to me, the CPO of a major multi-national corporation, “Well, at least someone knows something about privacy.”

 

And that’s the point, isn’t it? Even a five year old has the basic wisdom to understand the idea of human dignity and those things that should be held privately. The concept of privacy is intuitive. It is pure.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Will 'Passthoughts' Replace Passwords?

Will 'Passthoughts' Replace Passwords? | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Researchers from U.C. Berkeley say brain scan authentication is reliable enough to replace traditional passwords.

 

Rather than a using a password to gain access, a user would submit a “passthought,” generating a unique signal from brainwaves that may or may not prove difficult to duplicate by a hacker, Phys.org reported. The recent commercialization of external electroencephalogram (EEG) devices -- the researchers used a Neurosky MindSet, which connects wirelessly via bluetooth and costs about $100 -- makes this technology plausible.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

The 5 Biggest Online Privacy Threats of 2013

The 5 Biggest Online Privacy Threats of 2013 | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
Your Web-based life is under scrutiny, as businesses, law officials, and privacy advocates battle over how to protect your online data.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

California introduces 'right to know' data access bill, & why Silicon Valley will hate it

California introduces 'right to know' data access bill, & why Silicon Valley will hate it | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
As California considers going above and beyond what the EU gives its citizens in data access request rights, technology and Web firms in Silicon Valley will likely fight any hopes of such rights hopping across the Atlantic.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council from Higher Education & Information Security
Scoop.it!

Smartphones Keep Traces of Files Sent to the Cloud

Smartphones Keep Traces of Files Sent to the Cloud | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it
When smartphone users upload files to cloud-based services, remnants of those files often remain on their handheld device, even if the data is meant to be stored only in the cloud, researchers have found.

 

The consequence is that hackers could potentially access files stored in the cloud, or get access to cloud accounts, using leftover data stored on your Android device, iPhone or other smartphone.

 

The tracing of leftover data on smartphones is not for the layperson, Kothari says, but could be looked at as the modern-day equivalent of Dumpster-diving for personal information.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Hacker Creates Worldwide Map of Vulnerable Devices

Hacker Creates Worldwide Map of Vulnerable Devices | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

A hacker created a worldwide map of more than 100,000 vulnerable devices after “playing around” with a scripting tool. The “Carna” botnet was named after the Roman goddess that protected inner organs because it was “a good choice for a bot that runs mostly on embedded routers.” Carna ran from June to October last year and was allegedly never detected.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Senate “Dream Team” Introduces ECPA Reform Bill

Senate “Dream Team” Introduces ECPA Reform Bill | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) today introduced a bill that would reform the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). This Senate “Dream Team” will give ECPA reform a strong boost: Leahy, the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and original author of the 1986ECPA, is joining forces with Mike Lee, a Tea Party favorite, and a strong voice for Constitutional rights when the Committee marked up a nearly identical bill last year.

 

The Leahy-Lee bill would amend ECPA to require government officials to obtain a warrant in order to require ISPs or other online service providers to disclose the private communications of their users (except, of course, in emergency cases). This would include personal or proprietary documents stored with providers of “cloud” services (the increasingly popular services that allow companies, non-profits and individuals to edit documents from any location). Under ECPA as currently written, the warrant requirement applies only to email 180 days old or less and does not apply at all to documents stored in the cloud. Simply put, the goal of the Leahy-Lee legislation is to ensure that the warrant standard of the U.S. Constitution, which now applies to letters you send in the US Mail, is extended to your email.

 

Importantly, the legislation would maintain existing emergency exceptions to the warrant requirement so law enforcement can act quickly in those occasions when there is no time to go to a judge. It also leaves in place the provisions of current law that require providers – without a warrant – to affirmatively report child pornography and other child abuse of which they become aware.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

National Security Letters Are Unconstitutional, Federal Judge Rules

National Security Letters Are Unconstitutional, Federal Judge Rules | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

A federal district court judge in San Francisco has ruled that National Security Letter (NSL) provisions in federal law violate the Constitution. The decision came in a lawsuit challenging a NSL on behalf of an unnamed telecommunications company represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

 

The controversial NSL provisions EFF challenged on behalf of the unnamed client allow the FBI to issue administrative letters -- on its own authority and without court approval -- to telecommunications companies demanding information about their customers. The controversial provisions also permit the FBI to permanently gag service providers from revealing anything about the NSLs, including the fact that a demand was made, which prevents providers from notifying either their customers or the public. The limited judicial review provisions essentially write the courts out of the process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Higher Ed InfoSec Council
Scoop.it!

Privacy Pros: A Work in Progress

Privacy Pros: A Work in Progress | Higher Education & Privacy | Scoop.it

The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) has only been around for 13 years. Compare that, for example, to the American Bar Association, which was founded in 1878, or the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), which traces its roots back to 1884. But for a profession still in its infancy, there already seem to be some established “generations.”

 

I view the emerging generation as the fourth generation. The opportunities available for them as privacy professionals are unprecedented: undergraduate and graduate coursework, privacy-centric graduate degrees, fellowships, and internships with established privacy departments. But they face the same question that the generations before them faced: is privacy a viable career?

more...
No comment yet.