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Bloom's Taxonomy Apps- A Great Resource Section for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Bloom's Taxonomy Apps- A Great Resource Section for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | High school Literature | Scoop.it
"Appitic is one of the app resources I have featured here in this blog in several past instances. If you are looking for a platform where to access reviews of educational apps Appitic is one option among several others to consider. Here is a snapshot of the Bloom's Taxonomy apps appitic has compiled for you."
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The Best 10 Google Docs Tips For Teachers As They Go Back To School

The Best 10 Google Docs Tips For Teachers As They Go Back To School | High school Literature | Scoop.it
Back-to-school time is underway, and I’m sure you teachers are already balancing your lives, your classroom, and your pesky administrations. What could make life just a little bit easier for you? Google Docs, my dear educator friend.

Via John Evans
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Anuar Reza's comment, August 21, 2013 6:09 PM
Back to the future! :D Great tools! Tnx Mr. Evans!
Melanie Holcombe's curator insight, August 22, 2013 5:47 AM

We are using google docs for everything this school year.

Tracy Bodzioch Feighery's curator insight, August 22, 2013 3:58 PM

This article lists lots of tips for teachers to use in communicating coments and sharing student work.

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Rethinking Whole Class Discussion

Rethinking Whole Class Discussion | High school Literature | Scoop.it
Whole class discussions are, after lecture, the second most frequently used teaching strategy, one mandated by the Common Core State Standards because of its many rewards: increased perspective-takin

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:19 PM

Unfortunately, a preponderance of evidence demonstrates that many teachers mistakenly conflate discussion with recitation. "Typical teacher-student discourse resembles a quiz show, with teachers asking a question, the student replying, and the teacher evaluating the student's response. This is called initiation-response-evaluation, 'I-R-E,' or recitation."1

Some great tips on how to move to more student-centred discussions that delve into a deeper understanding.

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ISTE 2013: Google Lit Trips


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:10 PM

My good friend Kevin Amboe presenting at ISTE 2013.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture

The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture | High school Literature | Scoop.it
Due to Khan Academy's popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Fli...

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, August 4, 2013 7:50 AM

Useful overview and information on flipped teaching.

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The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers

The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers | High school Literature | Scoop.it
It's an interesting relationship that book lovers have with the Internet: most would rather read a physical book than something on an iPad or Kindle, and even though an Amazon purchase is just two ...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 6, 2013 11:07 AM

My birthday falls at the end of August. I used to joke about my annual present being the official letter from my district informing me that I was to "get off my butt and get back to work." I'd say it as though it was a bummer.

 

But, truthfully I was always excited by the prospect of at least a dozen or more great ideas I'd come up with that I couldn't wait to try out with my kids. I knonw, referring to my high school students as "my kids" is not the professional terminology. But, they were my kids.

 

It was my extension of the "in parentus locus" responsibilities associated with caring about them. I took those responsibilities seriously. So seriously that when I walked out the door for the last time after nearly 40 years, I actually still regretted the two times I had actually sent a kid to the office for behavior problems that I had failed to find a way to deal with that was effective and at the same time a win-win from the kid's point of view as well as from mine.

 

But, we all know the pressures involved in the job; essay correcting, unreasonable parents, teen angst and egos, policy police, budgetary tug-o-wars, and the natural complications of such a multi-layered hierarchy of decision making whose final word is influenced so much by lay persons with little actual knowledge of the best practices and pedagogies that may or may not be what is the best practice or pedagogy for indivdual students.

 

I have no doubt that these sorts of elements of any job exist. Like most important work, it can be very hard, exhausting, and often frustrating at times.

 

And, we've all seen a veteran or two who have been defeated by these challenges and who have had their original enthusiasm and optimism sucked out of them to the point where the mechanisms they employ to deal with these challenges have become thick fortresses of insulation leaving students and colleagues with little to see of that teacher's original vim, vigor, and caring about both the subject matter and the students.

 

I discovered somewhere along the line that it is important to refresh that caring; to find ways to remember why we became educators. 

 

I came to think of the process as marinating in my love of literature or taking time to go to a literary spa of sorts whether I'd know I'd walk out of that "spa" feeling refreshed and invigorated. Sometimes that "spa" was a real location. A weekend at the Slyvia Beach Hotel (http://www.sylviabeachhotel.com) in Nye Beach, Oregon. Ah! An Oregon hotel on the ocean where every inch and moment is dedicated to book lovers. 

 

In reality, it did not take many "spa" experiences to remind me of my love of reading great literature. But, if one or two a year left me so refreshed, why not 10 or 20 or heck, why not 187 or so as in why not refresh every morning?

 

So I began getting up in time to spend a leisurely 30 minutes or so exploring a story or two at one of the many virtual spas on the internet where book lovers gather to share their love of literature. 

 

Sometimes I'd head off to TED TALKS (http://www.ted.com) and watch an inspiring talk about topics in all areas and remind myself that there was a time in my own youth when I too, like my own students hadn't yet discovered an interest in "this or that other curricular area." And, I'd remember some teacher who had found a way to make a previously "boring" subject fascinating. It might have been Mr. Tinling's geometry class, Ms Alexander's history class, Mr. Muńoz's Civics class. And, like these and other great teachers and like the great TED Talk speakers I would get a daily dose of love of teaching. 

 

How could I get to school and not want to be that kind of a teacher for "my kids"? 

 

It didn't eliminate the challenges. But it kept them in their proper perspective. And, remembering how much I'd come to love literature and how much I owe to those teachers who shared their love of literature in ways that even the reluctant might find unavoidably captivating proved to be just the daily dose I needed to remind me  that caring about "my kids" was the key to keeping the challenges associated with being an educator to be remembered in perspective. 

 

Take a quick look at these websites for literature lovers and think of them as virtual "daily spa treatments" where you just can't help but head off to another day with your kids as refreshed and enthusiastic as they hope all of their teachers will be that day.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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The Life of a Library Book : books

The Life of a Library Book : books | High school Literature | Scoop.it
I work at a public library and was recently telling a friend about the cycles that the books go through and she was fascinated so I decided to share. ...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:54 AM

An interesting "personalized" story of the life of a Library Book.

 

Kind of touching to say the least.

 

I wonder whether the style of this article might make for an interesting writing exercise in reflective introspection. Perhaps, students could "become" the tellers of the stories of the life of...

 

a blankie

a tricycle

a favorite childhood book (though who can top The Velveteen Rabbit?)

a video game

a hamster

a divorced father or mother

a parent who abandoned his or her children

an adopted child

a parent's high school yearbook

a prom dress or wedding gown

a/an _________________

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

 

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10 Apps For More Organized Project-Based Learning

10 Apps For More Organized Project-Based Learning | High school Literature | Scoop.it
These 10 apps for iPad and Android will help you organize project-based learning in your classroom.

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imran bharti's curator insight, August 24, 2013 2:06 AM

i like it

imran bharti's comment, September 2, 2013 5:05 AM
good
Julie Bilz's curator insight, October 14, 2013 10:28 AM

Will be looking into this more thoroughly...

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Flipping My Classroom With Edmodo

Flipping My Classroom With Edmodo | High school Literature | Scoop.it
When my principal approached me and asked if I’d ever heard of “flipping my classroom,” my initial chuckle was soon replaced with confusion since I wasn’t familiar with the term.

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, August 18, 2013 4:15 PM

Another practical example of flipped teaching.

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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 15, 2013 12:26 PM

I've scooped John Green's videos before. But, here's another good one. 

 

Well worth considering clicking the subscribe button.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, August 15, 2013 5:57 PM

Excellent! Information presented in an informative, if somewhat frenetic method. Really gets into why reading matters in a most entertaining way. The original site is full of resources organised into grade appropriate categories. 

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eBook of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

eBook of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter | High school Literature | Scoop.it

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10 Teacher-Tested Tools for Flipping Your Classroom


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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, August 19, 2013 9:04 AM

Useful tips for flipped teaching.

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Art and Accidental Literature: Lynda Barry + Lord Chesterfield | Brain ...

Art and Accidental Literature: Lynda Barry + Lord Chesterfield | Brain ... | High school Literature | Scoop.it
A library of cross-disciplinary interestingness and combinatorial creativity.
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How-to: Have your iOS device read text for you - 9TO5Mac

How-to: Have your iOS device read text for you - 9TO5Mac | High school Literature | Scoop.it

"iOS devices are built with all users in mind: they come with several accessibility features for low-vision or legally blind users, settings for hard-of-hearing or deaf users, settings for individuals who have physical and motor difficulties, and settings for individuals with learning difficulties."


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Lapbooking

Lapbooking | High school Literature | Scoop.it
Quality Home School Educational Lapbook Project Packs for all Grade Levels and All Subjects. Over 400 different Lapbooks and Notebooks to choose from!

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Map

Map | High school Literature | Scoop.it

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:27 PM

I had a quite pleasant conversation this morning with Andrew Williams and Katie Williams, two of the founders of an interesting Literature project called "Placing Literature: Where Your Book Meets the Map."

 

Their focus is specifically on creating a map-based data base of locations that have been locations from literature. Their audience is primarily the general population rather than the specific education audience, We discussed the possibility of collaborating and/or partnering our efforts to the benefit of both of our audiences.

 

I am particularly intrigued by their crowd sourcing the data collection. Anyone can contribute data for a literary location by simply clicking location on the map which opens up a brief set of data entry cells. Fill in the info and you've added to the map. It's pretty simple.

 

Though more designed to document the locations than to follow a literary journey, as is the focus of Google Lit Trips, I'm certain that the growing database will be of interest to bibliophiles and book clubs and the general public. 

 

I'm looking forward to the possibilities of collaborating with Andrew and Katie so that both of our audiences benefit from the effort.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

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The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading

The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading | High school Literature | Scoop.it

"Summer reading assignments and reading quizzes and book reports don’t teach our students how to be readers. They teach them that reading is a school-centered activity. That it is a chore. That they aren’t good at it if they can’t remember insignificant plot points. These assignments set students up to cheat, or to fail, and always to regard reading as a drag."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 2, 2013 2:36 PM

Sometimes I try to create a virtual Venn Diagram showing the intersection between what it is that I love about reading great literature and what it is that we do as literary educators to encourage life-long reading and to measure our success in creating life-long readers.

 

I don't do this often as it can be a bit depressing. 

 

And sometimes, I wonder what would happen if some sort of "Opinion-Amnesia" happened in English Departments. What if every colleague at the department meetings, whether they had previously held opinions about what was worth teaching and how to effectively teach literature that had been in alignment with my own previously held opinions or not, had to suddenly start over and somehow rebuild and replace their ideas and beliefs regarding best practice in literary reading education?

 

I have no doubt that the vast majority of Literary Reading educators, whether their sense of best practice mirrored my own or was vastly different from my own are well-intended and dedicated to doing what they have come to believe is best for their students.

 

I also have no doubt that as my style and practice was incredibly effective for many of my students, that it at the same time not incredibly effective for other students who found my colleagues with very different styles and practices than my own to be much more effective.

 

So where might a well-intended English Department begin the process of rediscovering a personal opinion set of best practice?

 

What would be the essential question that would lead to refreshing a skill-set for effective literary reading education.

 

There would probably be a fairly universal agreement that learning HOW to read would be a universal goal. But, agreeing upon the best practice for for HOW to teach HOW to read would quickly become a matter for revisiting the many reasons behind decisions to be made on HOW to teach HOW to read.

 

And, given the premise that we would all be suffering from "Opinion-Abnesia" it wouldn't be possible to simply haul out our previous opinions on the matter. We'd actually have to revisit that essential question and revisit our reasoning behind our opinions.

 

After the essential questions associated with how to teach how to read. I'd jump right to what I think is at least an equally important essential question? WHY do we teach literary reading? Do we really believe that Shakespeare is essential? (And, I LOVE SHAKESPEARE) If Shakespeare is essential, why? And, are we satisfied with the success rate we have when teaching Shakespeare? 

 

Is our goal to create life-long readers or the next generation of English majors? 

 

If we asked everyone of our students what they thought the essential values of literary reading are, would they respond in sufficient numbers in ways we would hope to hear.

 

Well, I'm going on and on about ideas that are at the core of building an effective literary reading program. And, of course the ideas are far too important to dismiss as either easily dismissable or easily agreeable.

 

But, one last thought about this article's position on Summer Reading...

 

Is it possible to draw conclusions about summer reading? If we are truly advocates of life-long reading as a goal, then in a sense the question is ludicrous. Of course students should be reading during the summer. The question is really in the design of the integration of summer reading into literary reading educational practice. And, I'd suggest that if the design is misguided that summer reading may be responsible for killing any interest in reading among those students who haven't yet discovered sufficient reason to be literary readers beyond avoiding the hassles of passing tests.

 

And by the way, I'm not opposed to having to demonstrate that reading has been done but if passing the test trumps or drowns actually developing an engaged perception of the true value of literary reading as a life-long practice, then as well-intended as we may be, we may be inadvertently contributing to the misconception that hitting the bull's eye on the test is more important than discovering how to hit bulls' eyes in life's great challenges.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

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15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad

15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad | High school Literature | Scoop.it
15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:13 AM

Got iPads? Teach writing and reading?

 

Here you go!

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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Teaching the Ten Steps to Better Web Research

We offer an outstanding Web search tutorial called "Ten Steps to Better Web Research" at www.SweetSearch.com/TenSteps This presentation provides background, r...

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 11, 2013 3:45 AM

Students  need guidance when researching and how to locate information online. 

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10 Everyday Phrases That Originated From Poetry

10 Everyday Phrases That Originated From Poetry | High school Literature | Scoop.it
By Max Minckler for Riffle: Think poetry has nothing to do with you?

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:33 PM

I can't help but wonder how many of these "everyday phrases" actually are still everyday phrases. That is, are they too just something "old people" say? 

 

"Chickens coming home to roost"?

"Method to his madness"?

"Bite the dust"?

 

Really? Are these stiil everyday phrases? 

 

To be clear, I'm not suggesting that these phrases are not phrases that today's students can learn and come to understand. I'm simply suggesting that if the point is that they might be interesting to students because they ARE everyday phrases, as in they hear them frequently, and therefore might be potential engagement bridges between their own lives and the classics from which they originated, that this might not be a valid conclusion to draw or rely upon when designing an engaging learning experience for many 21st century learners.

 

I kind of felt a similar question when I first showed West Side Story to my students a few decades ago. When it came out it was a modern day adaptation of Romeo and Juliet. And, supposedly generated engaged traction with young people who were young THEN. But, that bridge is pretty aged now. 

 

Don't get me wrong, there are still fans of West Side Story, even among today's youth. But, for many the fact that it is a modern day adaptation just doesn't hold. Gangsters wearing neckties?

 

That's funnier than it is bridging for many.

 

There is a surge of modern day Shakespeare (and other classic literature) adaptations coming from Hollywood today. They may well be perceived and thus more welcomed as "modern day" bridges to the classics. And, they will succeed in ways that West Side Story succeeded when it actually looked at least a little bit like what Hollywood teenagers looked like to teenage audiences in 1961. Teen age audiences in 2013 are not seeing a Hollywood version of contemporary teens in West Side Story.

 

And, I'm all for recognizing that best practices change or evolve in order to create more successful connections for students and educators of the day. The Leonardo DiCaprio version of Romeo and Juliet, though clearly "Hollywoodized" had a much closer similarity to its contemporary teen audiences in 1996.

 

But, that very recognition is also at the heart of my realization that best practices, like #1 songs, fads, fashions, box office blockbuster movies, like video games, like so much that we know can move massive numbers of people to engage enthusiastically in that particular area of interest, has a shelf life. 

 

Remember Gangham Style? CDs? Neighborhood video rental stores?

 

Connecting to the contemporary is a great practice while that connection is in fact contemporary.

 

Some things never quite die, but their attractiveness as a means of generating engaging "contemporary" connections begins to fade for at least a very large proportion of those who once were captivated by those contemporary connections. And, I'd suggest that we amplify the problem by also considering those students who really are too young to have ever been a contemporary beneficiary of the powerful connections as likely to "appreciate the contemporary connections" for resources that never were contemporary in their own lifetimes.

 

Perhaps the shelf life of contemporary connectivity ought to be considered.  And, best practice regarding the use of "aging" resources, might require the moving those resources from the required learning experience shelf to the optional learning experience shelf.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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5 Flipped Classroom Issues (And Solutions) For Teachers - Edudemic

5 Flipped Classroom Issues (And Solutions) For Teachers - Edudemic | High school Literature | Scoop.it
There are some issues that come up when you have a flipped classroom. Here are tips and solutions for teachers living on the flip side.

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, August 12, 2013 9:31 AM

Some good tips and links to apps, as well.

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The Complete Listing of All Public Children’s Literature Statues in the United States — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production

The Complete Listing of All Public Children’s Literature Statues in the United States — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production | High school Literature | Scoop.it

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 15, 2013 6:46 AM

An absolutely charming collection of public children's literature sculptures. 

 

I would love to create a "story behind the story behind the sculpture" sort of Lit Trip project. 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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Getty Museum Sets 4,600 Images Free

Getty Museum Sets 4,600 Images Free | High school Literature | Scoop.it
Yesterday, the J. Paul Getty Trust announced that they will be "making roughly 4,600 high-resolution images of the Museum’s collection free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose."

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 16, 2013 1:18 PM

FLASH!!!

 

All responsible educators take copyright compliance seriously.

 

This is GREAT news for all educators and their students, but my mind immediately jumps to the potential for enriching the Google Lit Trips project!

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, August 17, 2013 2:37 AM

Great resource for all educators. History, inter cultural studies, history or civilisations, art history. Given that Getty rather plundered historical sites, it is good to see some access begging given back, albeit limited.

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'Stay, Illusion!': Re-reading Hamlet | KQED

'Stay, Illusion!': Re-reading Hamlet | KQED | High school Literature | Scoop.it
In their re-reading of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet,' philosophy professor Simon Critchley and psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster examine the play alongside writers and philosophers such as Lacan, Freud and Melville.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 20, 2013 8:03 PM

An interesting radio interview by one of my favorite NPR hosts, broadcast yesterday. It's almost an hour long, but takes a look at Hamlet through the perspective of Karasney's guests Dr. Jamieson Webster a psychoanalyst and Dr. Simon Critchley a philosophy professor.

 

Quite worth considering by any literary reading educator and potentially of value for more academic students. 

 

The premise is that by looking at Hamlet through the filters of both physchoanalysis and philosophy we can see why the play endures as a relevant exploration of the human condition.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

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TC Reading and Writing Project

TC Reading and Writing Project | High school Literature | Scoop.it
The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project is a research think tank and staff development organization housed at Teachers College, Columbia University. Led…

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