HigherEd Technology 2013
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HigherEd Technology 2013
What's happening in web 2.0 & technology in higher eduction
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How to Curate Addictive Content & Build a Loyal Following

How to Curate Addictive Content & Build a Loyal Following | HigherEd Technology 2013 | Scoop.it

Jeff Bullas wrote this piece and as always, he gives you some great ideas on how to strategically use content that adresses the needs of your audience.

 

He refers to blogging but the same applies when you're curating content and using 10 different addictive types of content that attracts readership like a magnet. 

 

This is when:

 

**You're providing solutions through content that addresses their pain points 

 

**When you consistently add your knowledge and expertise to the mix, you can become the "Go To Portal" for your subscribers.

 

Excerpt:

 

"One thing to keep in mind is that every business or reader has day to day challenges and problems that they want help in solving. Helping people find solutions and ideas is an easy way to provide addictive content"

 

Here are a few addictive content types.

 

**When you look at these and the others, be thinking about ways you can use these themes to find and curate content for your audience.

 

Mega Lists

 

**A long list of tips, tactics and answers that provide people with a resource that maps out many ideas that they can go back to as a reference have proven to work well.

 

Research

 

**The latest research provides signposts for future planning and validates and lends credibility to strategies.

 

**Research does need to be presented with well formatted articles that allow skimming and scanning for “time poor” excecutives!

 

****Bullet points, screen shots and subtitles are all important elements to provide easy reading.

 

Curated by JanLGordon covering  "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article: [http://bit.ly/w1LWFC]


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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | HigherEd Technology 2013 | Scoop.it

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]

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How to Curate Addictive Content & Build a Loyal Following

How to Curate Addictive Content & Build a Loyal Following | HigherEd Technology 2013 | Scoop.it

Jeff Bullas wrote this piece and as always, he gives you some great ideas on how to strategically use content that adresses the needs of your audience.


He refers to blogging but the same applies when you're curating content and using 10 different addictive types of content that attracts readership like a magnet. 


This is when:


**You're providing solutions through content that addresses their pain points 


**When you consistently add your knowledge and expertise to the mix, you can become the "Go To Portal" for your subscribers.


Excerpt:


"One thing to keep in mind is that every business or reader has day to day challenges and problems that they want help in solving. Helping people find solutions and ideas is an easy way to provide addictive content"


Here are a few addictive content types.


**When you look at these and the others, be thinking about ways you can use these themes to find and curate content for your audience.


Mega Lists


**A long list of tips, tactics and answers that provide people with a resource that maps out many ideas that they can go back to as a reference have proven to work well.


Research


**The latest research provides signposts for future planning and validates and lends credibility to strategies.


**Research does need to be presented with well formatted articles that allow skimming and scanning for “time poor” excecutives!


****Bullet points, screen shots and subtitles are all important elements to provide easy reading.


Curated by JanLGordon covering  "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article: [http://bit.ly/w1LWFC]


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Twitterology: A New Science? Could This Reveal Vital Info for the Future?

Twitterology: A New Science? Could This Reveal Vital Info for the Future? | HigherEd Technology 2013 | Scoop.it

Great article written by Ben Zimmer, a former On Language columnist for The New York Times Magazine, executive producer of VisualThesaurus.com & Vocabulary.com.  This appeared on Sunday in The New York Times

 

"For researchers, Twitter provides virtually limitless data about language in action."

 

Here are a few gems:

 

**Twitter is many things to many people, but lately it has been a gold mine for scholars in fields like linguistics, sociology and psychology who are looking for real-time language data to analyze.

 

**Twitter’s appeal to researchers is its immediacy — and its immensity.

 

**Regardless of how unserious Twitter exchanges may appear on the surface, linguists are discovering that Twitter can help uncover truths about our social interactions that are quite serious indeed.

 

James W. Pennebaker, a social psychologist at the University of Texas who pioneered the text-analysis program often used in this kind of research, warns that positive and negative emotion words are the “low-hanging fruit” in such studies, and

 

**that deeper linguistic analysis should be explored to provide a “richer, more nuanced view” of how people present themselves to the world.


But even if we can’t expect Twitter to be an unerring emotional barometer, it is proving extremely valuable for understanding how language varies among different demographic groups.

 

 

Curated by JanLGordon covering  "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article: http://nyti.ms/rT1w9O

 



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