Heart diseases an...
Follow
1.5K views | +0 today
Heart diseases and Heart Conditions
News worthy tips and science related to heart disease and heart conditions. Healthy lifestyles, secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation advice.
Curated by Rehabmyheart
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Doctor
Scoop.it!

mHealth tools: monitoring and modifying health behaviours are not the same thing

mHealth tools: monitoring and modifying health behaviours are not the same thing | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

The number of technical tools available to help patients live healthy lifestyles or control chronic health conditions has grown considerably during the past few years. But the percentage of patients who use some form of technology, such as mobile apps, to track health indicators has remained virtually unchanged for three years. 

The Pew Internet & American Life Project published a report Jan. 28 that found 69% of U.S. adults track at least one health indicator such as diet, exercise or weight. The survey of 3,014 adults conducted between Aug. 7 and Sept. 6, 2012, found that 49% monitor their progress in their heads, 34% track the information on paper, and 21% utilize some form of technology, including mobile apps, which 7% use. The results mirror findings from a Pew survey in 2010. 


Via Andrew Spong
more...
Andrew Spong's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:24 AM

The evidence base for the ability of mobile health interventions to modify behaviours is still emergent.

 

In the last instance, however, a quantified self device is going to be no more effective in improving health outcomes focused on, for example, levels of cardiovascular fitness than the disused cross trainer or exercise bike in your garage if it does not provoke a significant increase in levels of actvitiy.

 

And: why should it?

 

There is a line of reasoning that is justifiably sceptical of the ability of mHealth devices to prompt changes in levels of activity.

 

If getting on your analogue scales didn't prompt you to go for a jog, why should a device that merely represents the same data in a variety of colourful, digital ways?

Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Realms of Healthcare and Business
Scoop.it!

Software can breathe new life into medical devices

Software can breathe new life into medical devices | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Ennis, Co Clare-based Vitalograph specialises in cardio-respiratory technology, and provides equipment and clinical trials services to global pharmaceutical industries.

Via Usman Sattar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Heart Rates: Why are they important to know?

Heart Rates: Why are they important to know? | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
 There are many things that can affect the heart rate and are important to consider if you are a heart patient. Heart rate vary as the body's need to absorb oxygen and excrete carbon dioxide change...
more...
Rehabmyheart's comment, February 19, 2013 7:44 AM
Oh yes a constant debate, that is why the new technology is nice no arguing..also was the argument do you start with 0 or 1 when counting heart rates.
Ellen Diane's comment, February 19, 2013 7:46 AM
I started w/ 1- Good point- Perceived exertion is better- aside fromwhen they yap- I tell my class members you shold be able to carry on a conversation but...;):) I crack the whip
Ellen Diane's comment, February 19, 2013 7:47 AM
I learned that you get up to a 40% better work out putting yr mind in the muscle(s)
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Diabetes Management News
Scoop.it!

Explainer: what is diabetes?

Explainer: what is diabetes? | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
To keep your body functioning, glucose must always be present in your blood. It’s as important as oxygen in the air you breathe.

Via David Holloway
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Cardiac Rehabilitation Week

Cardiac Rehabilitation Week | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
This is national Cardiac Rehabilitation week. I would like to thank the AACVPR and all the Cardiac Rehabilitation programs out there for the tremendous amount of work that goes in to providing the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Most common form of heart valve disease linked to unusual cholesterol

Researchers have discovered a gene associated with a form of cholesterol that increases the risk of developing aortic stenosis, the most common form of heart valve disease, by more than half.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Heart defects
Scoop.it!

CHD Awareness Month

CHD Awareness Month | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
A guest post today by my wonderful friend Melissa, whose daughter battles congenital heart disease.

Via Ruth Caruthers
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Cardiovascular News & Updates
Scoop.it!

Are You a Cardiac Time Bomb? A Simple Heart Scan Can Tell

Are You a Cardiac Time Bomb? A Simple Heart Scan Can Tell | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
February is American Heart Month -- a time for all of us to refocus on preventing cardiovascular disease. So, here's a pop quiz. Who is more likely to die from a heart attack or other cardiovascular-related event?

Via Usman Sattar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

What Go Red for Women means to me

What Go Red for Women means to me | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Women and Heart Disease There was a time when it was thought heart disease was  considered largely a man’s disease, when doctor’s rarely looked for coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Then epide...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Patient
Scoop.it!

Robodocs and tricorders: a telemedicine-informed future for health

Robodocs and tricorders: a telemedicine-informed future for health | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Aside from the rise of sensors, expanded broadband access and the ubiquity of connected and mobile devices among patients and doctors, several health-specific trends are making remote care more of a reality. More patients are coming online, meaning that fewer doctors will be needed to serve more patients; payment models are shifting from fee-for-service to managed care approaches that emphasize patient outcomes; and hospitals are under more pressure to keep re-admission rates down. Remote monitoring and communication technology could play a critical role in addressing each of those issues.

 

Some telehealth innovations, like the iRobot that lets doctors visit  a patient’s bedside via an electronic avatar and 15-inch screen, seem like the stuff of science fiction. San Francisco-based Scanadu is developing handheld tools that have been likened to the StarTrek “Tricorder.”  A recent product lets you check your temperature, blood oxygen levels, pulse and other vitals by holding the device close to your body. Then it sends the information to your smartphone, where it can be sent on to your doctor. To encourage more innovation in sensor-based mobile technology, the X Prize Foundation even developed the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize competition (in which Scanadu is a participant). A “Magic Carpet”developed by researchers at GE and Intel, uses sensors in home carpets to monitor seniors’ activity and then predict and detect falls.

 

 


Via Andrew Spong
more...
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

MSCVPR | Michigan Society for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation

MSCVPR | Michigan Society for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Rehabmyheart's insight:

In honor of Cardiac Rehabilitation week I would like to honor those who work tirelessly to make sure heart patients recieve the benefits of Cardiac Rehabilitation programs throughout the state. These are the leaders of the industry, who collect and report the outcomes, ensure legislative issues are addressed, and provide membership education. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Carbohydrates and Heart Disease

Carbohydrates and Heart Disease | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
The following link is a research study looking at how sucrose (a form of sugar) affects the heart.  Regularly consuming sucrose — the type of sugar found in many sweetened beverages — i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Smoking cessation in old age: Less heart attacks and strokes within five years

Smoking cessation in old age: Less heart attacks and strokes within five years | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
It is never too late to stop smoking. Even if you have heart disease, by stopping smoking now you lower you risk for further heart issues. Here is a recent study to support stopping tobacco to help...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Heart and Vascular Health
Scoop.it!

Another caution about "natural" therapies: toxins in Red Yeast Rice extracts

Another caution about "natural" therapies: toxins in Red Yeast Rice extracts | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Red yeast rice (RYR) is a commonly used dietary supplement for the management of dyslipidemia. In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a consumer warning to avoid RYR products because they may contain unauthorized drug (lovastatin) and also implemented Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) requiring that proper controls be in place by dietary supplement companies to ensure products are manufactured and processed in a consistent manner and produce high-quality products that are not adulterated with impurities or contaminants and are accurately labeled.

In this paper in Journal of Clinical Lipidology it is reported that the FDA had no information on the number of RYR manufacturers and their compliance with CGMP regulations. A total of 101 products containing RYR were reviewed. No product could be confirmed as passing any independent laboratory verification testing. Nearly one-half (42.6%) of the RYR product labels contained statin-related warnings (ie, potential for muscle pain or weakness, etc).

Currently, the FDA is not regulating manufacturers of RYR products and as a result, many of these products may contain monacolin K and toxins such as citrinin.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
more...
Nancy Rosas Delgadillo's curator insight, February 18, 2013 7:54 PM

Interesante artículo, sin embargo muy avanzado. 10 de 10

Ellen Diane's curator insight, February 20, 2013 8:09 AM

thank you for this

Rehabmyheart's comment, February 20, 2013 8:12 AM
I would come across many patients who were on statins plus the red yeast rice, talk about compounding effects!
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

What are my chances of getting Heart Disease?

What are my chances of getting Heart Disease? | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
The Multiplier Effect 1 risk factor doubles your risk 2 risk factors quadruple your risk 3 or more risk factors can increase your risk more than tenfold By doing just 4 things – eating right, being...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Cardiovascular News & Updates
Scoop.it!

ICD Shock Tests Not Harmful

ICD Shock Tests Not Harmful | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Performing shock threshold testing at the time of defibrillator implantation is safe and does not lead to worse outcomes, an analysis of the MADIT-CRT trial found.

Via Usman Sattar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Winter effects on your heart

Winter effects on your heart | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
If you are a heart patient you might be concerned about how the cold weather affects your heart.  The body constricts blood flow to the skin to conserve heat, which also raises blood pressure. Many...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Chest pain prior to a heart attack can protect the heart

Patients who experience chest pain in the 24 hours preceding a heart attack, also called preinfarction angina, have smaller heart attacks and improved cardiac function in the contemporary cardiac stenting era, researchers found.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Heart and Vascular Health
Scoop.it!

High intake of supplemental calcium associated with excess CVD death in men but not women

High intake of supplemental calcium associated with excess CVD death in men but not women | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Importance Calcium intake has been promoted because of its proposed benefit on bone health, particularly among the older population. However, concerns have been raised about the potential adverse effect of high calcium intake on cardiovascular health.

 

Objective To investigate whether intake of dietary and supplemental calcium is associated with mortality from total cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease, and cerebrovascular diseases.

 

Results During a mean of 12 years of follow-up, 7904 and 3874 CVD deaths in men and women, respectively, were identified. Supplements containing calcium were used by 51% of men and 70% of women. In men, supplemental calcium intake was associated with an elevated risk of CVD death (RR>1000 vs 0 mg/d, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.36), more specifically with heart disease death (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.37) but not significantly with cerebrovascular disease death (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.81-1.61). In women, supplemental calcium intake was not associated with CVD death (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.96-1.18), heart disease death (1.05; 0.93-1.18), or cerebrovascular disease death (1.08; 0.87-1.33). Dietary calcium intake was unrelated to CVD death in either men or women.

 

Conclusions and Relevance Our findings suggest that high intake of supplemental calcium is associated with an excess risk of CVD death in men but not in women. Additional studies are needed to investigate the effect of supplemental calcium use beyond bone health.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
more...
Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:16 PM

Thre has been concern that the risks of taking calcium supplements may exceed the benefits in some patients. The "hardening of the arteries" that causes vascular problems such as heart attack, stroke and gangrene, is caused by calcium deposits (vascular calcification).  Taking high doses of calcium raises the available calcium in the blood vessles for deposit in the artery wall and the calcium may not be incorporated in the bones which is the goal of treatment.  The recommendation that men consider avoiding calciu supplemetns is reasonable.

Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Diabetes and Your Heart

Diabetes and Your Heart | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Know your family history, does it include diabetes? If so make sure you know your numbers. A blood sugar greater than 1oo when fasting  140 for someone two hours after eating is considered high. Wh...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Bottled-up anger, anxiety can harm your heart

Bottled-up anger, anxiety can harm your heart | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Let it out. According to new German research, keeping your fear, anger, or anxiety to yourself can boost your risk for high blood pressure, known to be a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rehabmyheart from Doctor
Scoop.it!

Patients are people, not numbers or diseases

Patients are people, not numbers or diseases | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

drlj writes:

 

At times it is convenient and even desirable to omit a patient’s name in a conversation. It was suggested on Twitter that it may be better to overhear what ‘bed 9′ needs rather than ‘John Doe is ready for his haemorrhoidectomy,’ and in this case I agree! My worry is that in most cases there is no explicit intent to maintain confidentiality. Instead the convenience of referring to people by their bed number slips into routine communication. I have certainly been guilty of this myself. I worry that this is not merely disrespectful, but that it contributes to the dehumanising experience of being a patient, and negatively impacts on the doctor-patient relationship.

 

There are many factors that contribute to dehumanisation in hospitals. It is often not the fault of individuals, and I would certainly not suggest any of the nurses I work with are uncaring. Instead the environment and structures inherent in the way we work create an “us and them” divide where healthcare workers and patients are in different tribes. This extends to factors as simple as the clothes we wear, an example of “deindividuation.” I am always amazed by the dramatic transformation when a patient puts on their own clothes as they get ready to leave hospital, having previously only worn a generic hospital gown. They miraculously turn into a “person” rather than a “patient.”

 

If and when I become a patient I want my medical team to treat my as an individual, consider my personal context and experience of illness, and integrate this into their decision-making process. I do not want to be referred to as “bed 2.”I realise that as a Medical Reg I would embody ‘the nightmare patient’, but something approaching this true partnership model should be what we aspire to for every patient, not just those (like me) who explicitly demand it. Many things need to change to achieve this ideal including; better data sharing with, and ownership by patients; better public and patient education allowing valuable discussion about trial data and the value and limits of evidence-based medicine; and a dramatic change in our IT structures such that they enhance rather than impede communication across arbitrary boundaries of primary, secondary  and tertiary care.

 

We should work to achieve system changes, but they will take time to implement.We can take immediate personal responsibility for our own actions and our own role in dehumanisation in healthcare.

 


Via Andrew Spong
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rehabmyheart
Scoop.it!

Ignoring Heart Disease Won’t Lower Your Risk

Ignoring Heart Disease Won’t Lower Your Risk | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Help for recovery from heart conditions
more...
No comment yet.