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Heart diseases and Heart Conditions
News worthy tips and science related to heart disease and heart conditions. Healthy lifestyles, secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation advice.
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Heart Health in Future Foretold in Teens

Heart Health in Future Foretold in Teens | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it
Many U.S. adolescents are already on their way to increased cardiovascular risk in adulthood, researchers found.

Roughly half of about 5,000 study participants ages 12 to 19 (54.7% of males and 50.5% of females) met "ideal" standards for fewer than five of the seven variables developed by the American Heart Association to define cardiovascular health, according to Christina Shay, PhD, of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, and colleagues.

And 0% met all seven variables including not smoking and having low total cholesterol, the researchers reported online in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.


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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:30 PM

Will this be the first generation that has worse health than the prior generation?  It is amazing that 0% of the surveyed teens met all the ideal seven variables:

Cardiovascular health among adolescents is defined using the ideal state of seven variables:

Smoking status (never smoked)Body mass index (BMI below the 85th percentile)Dietary intake (consumption of healthy levels of at least four of the following: vegetables, fish, whole grains, sodium, and added sugar in sugar-sweetened beverages)Physical activity (at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day)Blood pressure (below the 90th percentile)Blood glucose (less than 100 mg/dLTotal cholesterol (less than 170 mg/dL)

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High intake of supplemental calcium associated with excess CVD death in men but not women

High intake of supplemental calcium associated with excess CVD death in men but not women | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Importance Calcium intake has been promoted because of its proposed benefit on bone health, particularly among the older population. However, concerns have been raised about the potential adverse effect of high calcium intake on cardiovascular health.

 

Objective To investigate whether intake of dietary and supplemental calcium is associated with mortality from total cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease, and cerebrovascular diseases.

 

Results During a mean of 12 years of follow-up, 7904 and 3874 CVD deaths in men and women, respectively, were identified. Supplements containing calcium were used by 51% of men and 70% of women. In men, supplemental calcium intake was associated with an elevated risk of CVD death (RR>1000 vs 0 mg/d, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.36), more specifically with heart disease death (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.37) but not significantly with cerebrovascular disease death (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.81-1.61). In women, supplemental calcium intake was not associated with CVD death (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.96-1.18), heart disease death (1.05; 0.93-1.18), or cerebrovascular disease death (1.08; 0.87-1.33). Dietary calcium intake was unrelated to CVD death in either men or women.

 

Conclusions and Relevance Our findings suggest that high intake of supplemental calcium is associated with an excess risk of CVD death in men but not in women. Additional studies are needed to investigate the effect of supplemental calcium use beyond bone health.


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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:16 PM

Thre has been concern that the risks of taking calcium supplements may exceed the benefits in some patients. The "hardening of the arteries" that causes vascular problems such as heart attack, stroke and gangrene, is caused by calcium deposits (vascular calcification).  Taking high doses of calcium raises the available calcium in the blood vessles for deposit in the artery wall and the calcium may not be incorporated in the bones which is the goal of treatment.  The recommendation that men consider avoiding calciu supplemetns is reasonable.

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Are Drugs Better Than Carotid Stents?

Are Drugs Better Than Carotid Stents? | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

My comment: This is an important question for our patients and unfortunately we will porbably never get an answer because the study would be expensive and there is no likely source for funding an outcomes study that would be needed.  With all blocked arteries (heart, head or legs) the options for treatment are medications to control or slow the progression of the blockage OR stents OR surgery.  The benefits and safety hazards are improving for all three so making comparisons using older data is not useful,.  For now we know stents are about equivalent to surgery in blocked carotid arteries.  Is medicine equal or even better? 

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A debate is taking place among physicians over whether drug therapies to prevent stroke have surpassed stents or carotid artery surgery as the best treatment for many patients with artery blockage in the neck.


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Atrial Fibrillation Toolkit

Atrial Fibrillation Toolkit | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

ACC has pulled together a toolkit to help treat patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) based on the most recent evidence and best practices. Developed by experts and field-tested, the AFib Toolkit is a valuable and free reference or point-of-care resource you can use on your own time.

There is a very useful patient education section at the bottom which paitents will find valuable


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Weight Training Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men

Weight Training Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Take Home Message: Physicians have recommended a MINIMUM of 150 minues of exercise weekly for diabetic risk reduction but the role resistance training or weight lifting is not certain.  In this study, weight training was associated with a significantly lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM), independent of aerobic exercise. Combined weight training & aerobic exercise conferred a greater benefit.

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Association of weight training with risk of T2DM in US men & to assess the influence of combining weight training and aerobic exercise, a prospective cohort study of 32 002 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1990-2008. Weekly time spent on weight training & aerobic exercise (including brisk walking, jogging, running, bicycling, swimming, tennis, squash, and calisthenics/rowing) was obtained from questionnaires at baseline and biennially during follow-up. 

During 508 332 person-years of follow-up (18 years)

=> 2278 new cases of T2DM

=> dose-response relationship: increasing time spent on weight training or aerobic exercise and lower risk of T2DM (P < .001 for trend)

=> Engaging in weight training or aerobic exercise for at least 150 minutes per week was independently associated with a lower risk of T2DM of 34% (95% CI, 7%-54%) and 52% (95% CI, 45%-58%), respectively.

+> Men who engaged in aerobic exercise & weight training for at least 150 minutes per week had the greatest reduction in T2DM risk (59%; 95% CI, 39%-73%)


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Another caution about "natural" therapies: toxins in Red Yeast Rice extracts

Another caution about "natural" therapies: toxins in Red Yeast Rice extracts | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Red yeast rice (RYR) is a commonly used dietary supplement for the management of dyslipidemia. In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a consumer warning to avoid RYR products because they may contain unauthorized drug (lovastatin) and also implemented Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) requiring that proper controls be in place by dietary supplement companies to ensure products are manufactured and processed in a consistent manner and produce high-quality products that are not adulterated with impurities or contaminants and are accurately labeled.

In this paper in Journal of Clinical Lipidology it is reported that the FDA had no information on the number of RYR manufacturers and their compliance with CGMP regulations. A total of 101 products containing RYR were reviewed. No product could be confirmed as passing any independent laboratory verification testing. Nearly one-half (42.6%) of the RYR product labels contained statin-related warnings (ie, potential for muscle pain or weakness, etc).

Currently, the FDA is not regulating manufacturers of RYR products and as a result, many of these products may contain monacolin K and toxins such as citrinin.


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Nancy Rosas Delgadillo's curator insight, February 18, 2013 7:54 PM

Interesante artículo, sin embargo muy avanzado. 10 de 10

Ellen Diane's curator insight, February 20, 2013 8:09 AM

thank you for this

Rehabmyheart's comment, February 20, 2013 8:12 AM
I would come across many patients who were on statins plus the red yeast rice, talk about compounding effects!
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Heart rate monitor in a mirror

Heart rate monitor in a mirror | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

My comment: More efforts to develop connected health for consumers. Will this be valuable? Probably not since a mobile health option that allows heart rate assessment at times throughout the day would be more valuable for assessment in health and disease.

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New high-tech mirrors are melding with digital components to act as health-monitoring devices that measure vital signs, in-shop equipment to try on clothes virtually and displays to keep track of news and information. 


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Vitamins Herbal & Natural - A Cardiologists Perspective

Pentucket Medical cardiologists Seth Bilazarian and Sunny Srivastava discuss vitamins and dietary supplements as alternative, complimentary and natural therapies.

Patients often think doctors are "against" the use of vitamin or herbal therapies.  I try to explain on our community program "Matters of the Heart"  the doctors viewpoint on Vitamin supplements - cautions and recommendations.  I speak about Vitamin D deficiency and its treatment.

Because its a VItamin or because it says its natural doesn't mean its good.


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Your Car as Your Doctor

Your Car as Your Doctor | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Ford is developing a car seat capable of monitoring drivers’ ECG to provide real-time health information and alerts of imminent cardiovascular issues such as a heart attack or arrhythmias.

My comment=> The technology is evolving rapidly.  How this will compete with or integrate with mobile devices and wearable monitoring devices remains to be seen.  The auto industry has had reasonable commercial success integrateing technology for entertainement purposes and also new safety technologies.  This health monitoring approach seems like a commercial gimmick, but might help sell cars.  i can envision the marketing of the speeding car with tachometer and heart rate monitor displayed side by side.


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Half of heart patients don't stick with meds

Half of heart patients don't stick with meds | Heart diseases and Heart Conditions | Scoop.it

Take Home Message:  It's known that patients don't always follow doctors' orders and few systems exist  to address this.  In my experience, the best way to stay on track is to have regular (twice annual) follow-up with a physician who is monitoring critical values like cholesterol & blood pressure and reviews the medication list to explain the utility and benefit of continued medication adherence.  It's not sophisticated, doesn't involve technology, but does work.

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Just half of people who are given a prescription to prevent heart disease continue to get their medications refilled over time. And among people who have already had a heart attack, one out of every three fails to continue getting their prescription refilled. The studies looked at seven medications, including aspirin, blood pressure drugs, and cholesterol-lowering statins, typically intended for life-long use. They estimate that 130,000 people die each year because they don't adhere to their prescriptions. 


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