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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Job strain as a risk factor for heart disease

Job strain as a risk factor for heart disease | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: The risk of job strain or the more common American term "stress" was small (only 3.4%) Dr. Debabrata Mukherjee writing for Cardiosource.org puts this in perspective: risks of "smoking (36%), abdominal obesity (20%) & physical inactivity (12%). While society strives to reduce job strain and improve working conditions, we need to continue to focus on eliminating smoking and encouraging lifestyle modifications (i.e., healthy diet and regular physical activity), which are far more impactful methods of reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases."

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Previous assessments of psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease are inconsistent.  This study analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease  Thirteen European studies (1985—2006) of men & women without coronary heart disease who were employed at baseline were assessed. Job strain was measured with questionnaires and coronary heart disease defined as the first heart attack (MI) or coronary death.

30,214 (15%) of participants reported job strain and (mean follow-up 7·5 years), recorded 2358 events of incident coronary heart disease. After adjustment for sex and age, the hazard ratio for job strain versus no job strain was 1·23 (95% CI 1·10—1·37).

An association between job strain and coronary heart disease for sex, age groups, socioeconomic strata, and region, and after adjustments for socioeconomic status, and lifestyle and conventional risk factors. The population attributable risk for job strain was 3·4%.
The  findings suggest that prevention of workplace stress might decrease disease incidence; however, this strategy would have a much smaller effect than would tackling of standard risk factors, such as smoking.

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Stress has less effect on high-ranking baboons—and British civil servants

Stress has less effect on high-ranking baboons—and British civil servants | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home message:  Patients ask me every day about stress and health.  The amount of stress is not correlated to health outcomes; the response to stress is what matters.  From a very practical standpoint stress can lead to unhealthy behaviors: smoking, alcohol, eating, disrupted sleep. Controlling stress may be the key.  The alpha male in the baboon troop can control stress by choosing when to fight. Humans can control this by intentionally taking a break: day off, vacation, meditation, recreational diversions like walking or hobbies.  It matters.

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