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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
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You Used to Get One Life. Now You Get Two. #NotDeadYet

You Used to Get One Life. Now You Get Two. #NotDeadYet | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
The most important difference between the world today and 150 years ago isn’t airplane flight or nuclear weapons or the Internet. It’s lifespan. We used to live 35 or 40 years on average in the United States, but now we live almost 80.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

This extension of age has been in part due to progress in medical care.  Not long ago cardiologists would hesitate taking aggressive approaches with people over 70 years old.  We now take pause with patients who have an age with 3 digits.

See my Vlog - "Cardiologists are Ageists" at theheart.org at

http://www.theheart.org/columns/private-practice/cardiologists-are-ageists.do or on Medscape at  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/807115

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Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Women Who Quit Smoking Do Live Longer

Women Who Quit Smoking Do Live Longer | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Life expectancy was dramatically improved among participants in Great Britain's Million Women Study who quit smoking compared with continuous smokers, confirming the previously uncertain benefits of smoking cessation in women, researchers said.

Although women who stopped smoking around age 50 remained at significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with never-smokers (relative risk 1.56, 95% CI 1.49 to 1.64), it was much lower than the tripled risk of death seen in current smokers.

"Even cessation at about 50 years of age avoids at least two-thirds of the continuing smoker's excess mortality in later middle age."

"Stopping well before age 40 years would avoid well over 90% of the excess hazard in continuing smokers."

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How much exercise is enough?

How much exercise is enough? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: Here's the answer to the question => What's the least I have to do? Answer: the more you do the better.  Fitness & Fatness independently important.

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“We found that adding low amounts of physical activity to one’s daily routine, such as 75 minutes of brisk walking per week, was associated with increased longevity: a gain of 1.8 years of life expectancy after age 40, compared with doing no such activity"

We all know that exercise is good for you, but how good? While previous studies have shown the link between physical activity and a lower risk of premature mortality, the number of years of life expectancy gained among persons with different activity levels has been unclear — until now.

In a new study from Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, researchers have quantified how many years of life are gained by being physically active at different levels, among all individuals as well as among various groups having different body mass indexes (BMI).

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